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Why is NH4Cl(aq) acidic and CH3COOHNa(aq) basic?


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#1 little boy

little boy

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 08:20 AM

Why is NH4Cl(aq) acidic and CH3COOHNa(aq) basic?
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#2 Greg Boyles

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 12:47 PM

Why is NH4Cl(aq) acidic and CH3COOHNa(aq) basic?


CH3COOH is acetic acid or vinegar. What you mean is NaCH3COO or sodium acetate. CH3COOHNa is incorrect notation.

CH3COOH incompletely dissociates in aqueous solution to give you a mixture of CH3COOH and HCH3COO (hydrogen acetate or H+ and CH3COO-) The pressence of H+ makes the solution acidic.

By the same token the CH3COO- ions in NaCH3COO solution partially re-associate with hydrogen ions to form a small amount of CH3COOH or acetic acid.

The hydrogen ions are torn off water molecules, and when you do this you are left with hydroxide ions OH-. Hydroxide ions make an aqueous solution alkaline.
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