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Is venison healthy?


Tampitump
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Would you choose a life that is completely free over a life that is free of suffering?

You haven't demonstrated that the former is not free from suffering, or that the latter IS free from it, you've just asserted it. I'm not sure if wild animals live better than all farm animals, but I still believe that harvesting a deer is more ethical than having animals be raised in farms, fed antibiotics and pumped full of hormones, and made nearly sick, hopelessly awaiting slaughter. The deer goes on about its happy little life, and one day, it gets shot through the heart and dies within seconds. Thats more ethical to me.
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You haven't demonstrated that the former is not free from suffering, or that the latter IS free from it, you've just asserted it. I'm not sure if wild animals live better than all farm animals, but I still believe that harvesting a deer is more ethical than having animals be raised in farms, fed antibiotics and pumped full of hormones, and made nearly sick, hopelessly awaiting slaughter. The deer goes on about its happy little life, and one day, it gets shot through the heart and dies within seconds. Thats more ethical to me.

 

I think you need to do some demonstrating yourself. How do you know a deer is "happy", and that a farm raised animal is "hopeless" and that it "awaits slaughter"? You seem to be assigning human traits to these animals.

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You haven't demonstrated that the former is not free from suffering, or that the latter IS free from it, you've just asserted it. I'm not sure if wild animals live better than all farm animals, but I still believe that harvesting a deer is more ethical than having animals be raised in farms, fed antibiotics and pumped full of hormones, and made nearly sick, hopelessly awaiting slaughter. The deer goes on about its happy little life, and one day, it gets shot through the heart and dies within seconds. Thats more ethical to me.

In any natural space everything is trying to eat each other. Fear is a necessary constant in nature unless it's an apex predator; happiness not. That's a very broad brush you are using there and anthropomorphising animals

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In any natural space everything is trying to eat each other. Fear is a necessary constant in nature unless it's an apex predator; happiness not. That's a very broad brush you are using there and anthropomorphising animals

not anthopomorphizing or ascribing anything to them. I'm simply answering two questions. 1) Am I going to eat meat?, and 2) If so, which choice seems the most ethical route? Insofar as I understand how suffering is experienced, I'll generally go with wild game.
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not anthopomorphizing or ascribing anything to them. I'm simply answering two questions. 1) Am I going to eat meat?, and 2) If so, which choice seems the most ethical route? Insofar as I understand how suffering is experienced, I'll generally go with wild game.

 

As already pointed out, you said "pumped full of hormones, and made nearly sick, hopelessly awaiting slaughter", which to me is certainly anthropomorphizing. It's not kind - they don't like it. >:D

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So, I live on 12 acres in the Sierras. We are relatively tapped in to our local agricultural industry. I shoot around 4-6 mule deer a year on our property and 6-10 turkeys. We have a 1 acre orchard. We raise two dozen broiler chickens a year, We buy a cow, a pig and three sheep a year from local farms. We get our vegetables from a local CSA and I am personal friends with the dairy I get my milk and cheese from, and my wife bakes bread from scratch.

 

I am very lucky to live in a rural setting where I can know pretty much precisely where all my food. Venison is healthy, low fat meat either cook it rare, or for a long time ( e.g curry) to get the best out of it.

Edited by Arete
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You haven't demonstrated that the former is not free from suffering, or that the latter IS free from it, you've just asserted it. I'm not sure if wild animals live better than all farm animals, but I still believe that harvesting a deer is more ethical than having animals be raised in farms, fed antibiotics and pumped full of hormones, and made nearly sick, hopelessly awaiting slaughter. The deer goes on about its happy little life, and one day, it gets shot through the heart and dies within seconds. Thats more ethical to me.

 

 

I didn't assert anything, I just asked you a question.

 

Which would you prefer?

 

1/ A daily struggle to find food, that's often scarce.

 

2/ A minute by minute vigilance to avoid being eaten.

 

3/ The ever present risk of injury or disease, either of which could result in a slow painful death.

 

4/ Finding shelter to stay safe, dry and warm in bad weather.

 

Or

 

None of the above.

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I didn't assert anything, I just asked you a question.

 

Which would you prefer?

 

1/ A daily struggle to find food, that's often scarce.

 

2/ A minute by minute vigilance to avoid being eaten.

 

3/ The ever present risk of injury or disease, either of which could result in a slow painful death.

 

4/ Finding shelter to stay safe, dry and warm in bad weather.

 

Or

 

None of the above.

Yes, When we walk into that beautiful wood with the sun's rays dappling the ground through the trees, there's murder, rape and pillage going on every second of the day. :) Just go fishing and you see it all. Six little ducklings following mummy duck and, one by one, they disappear throughout the day; snacks for unseen monsters lurking below.

Edited by StringJunky
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