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Komnen

Math and Chemistry

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Its bad I could only do 5 posts in 24 h.

 

Its the mathematic in chemistry only basic?!

I would say NO , hope I can explain this :

If u know about theory of Probability and Statistic , you can study when and how can a chemistry reaction happen , and when it can make us better result.... There is a lot of Math in theory of probability and statistic , belive me.

 

Then if u know the graphics that u find after u make a Spectrophotometer of The flow conductivity of a substance towards pH , u can consider it ( and it is) as a function, and in math u can do a lot of stuff with function, what happen with that element if his function It reaches the maximum value? or even more what if we suppose to have the function is not continuous to a point , what happen with Ph of element or flow in that point?

 

...

I dont know a lot in chemistry , but with help of my friends and my math acquaintances we can solve some problems.

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Computational chemistry ....

 

 

Was the first thing I thought of as well. There are is a huge demand/market for expertise in this area and it is increasingly important in areas like drug discovery, simulating cell behaviour, etc.

 

Can you expand on that with some nice examples that really are beyond arithmetic, basic calculus, linear algebra and integral transforms?

 

 

It is somewhat outside my area of expertise as well, but modern physical chemistry uses and overlaps to a large extent with quantum theory. (Some of the best answers related to quantum theory on another forum have come from a chemist rather than a physicist.)

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Okay, so correct me!

 

Looking at the syllabus of a few universities it does not seem that a typical student leaving with an undergrad education will have been exposed to any high brow mathematics - the same is true of typical physics educations.

 

After that things will depend a lot more on the tastes and interests of the individuals - chemistry research covers a lot of things including things boarding with theoretical physics.

This is starting to get off topic, but I do feel like you're shifting the goal posts a bit here. You're initial claim was that most chemistry doesn't deal with anything beyond basic numeracy. I don't believe that this is a fair assumption. The math involved in quantum modelling, spectroscopy, docking, kinetics and other areas of physical chemistry, some types of analytical chemistry, etc., might not be what you would consider high brow, but surely it's beyond basic numeracy.

 

OP, I'm sure you can find space to get an MSc of PhD in math and chemistry, but you will need to have some understanding of the chemistry and physics involved. You will also probably need to look abroad for an appropriate program and supervisor. I would look into the areas suggested and pick a few things you think you'd be interested in, perhaps look into some recent papers in the area, and then look to universities and institutions with groups that meet your needs.

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Can you expand on that with some nice examples that really are beyond arithmetic, basic calculus, linear algebra and integral transforms?

 

 

I would be very happy to be corrected and shown how advanced mathematics is part of a typical chemists tool kit.

You were corrected- what you did to show your happiness was to move the goal posts from

" there is almost no mathematics in chemistry apart from basic numeracy."

 

to

"beyond arithmetic, basic calculus, linear algebra and integral transforms"

 

Nice try.

Did you think we wouldn't notice.

 

Why not just face up to the idea that you just slandered a profession because you didn't know what you were talking about?

 

There is, for the record, a whole lot of group theory tucked away in there too.

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My first exposure to symmetry groups, and application of Fourier transforms, was in a third year, half course on x-ray crystallography.

Arguably solid state physics, but the boundary between physics and chemistry is not well defined in a lot of areas.

 

These guys ( and girls ) play rough, AJB.

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My first exposure to symmetry groups, and application of Fourier transforms, was in a third year, half course on x-ray crystallography.

Arguably solid state physics, but the boundary between physics and chemistry is not well defined in a lot of areas.

 

These guys ( and girls ) play rough, AJB.

When tacitly told "you have no skills beyond basic numeracy" most groups here will cut up pretty rough; especially when it's by someone who admits they don't know what they are talking about- and then seeks to cover up for it by trying to move the goal posts..

The distinction between chemistry and physics is pretty much arbitrary.However if you want to study chemistry at degree level you had better understand quantum mechanics, group theory and so on because they are part of the syllabus.

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Have we done sniping now?

 

I am more concerned with the lack of OP response to my post#23

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Most math in chemistry is basic algebra. Unless you're taking/ focusing on physical chemistry, then you need calculus I-III..but who uses that shit? ((P-chem is trash).

Edited by Elite Engineer

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Most math in chemistry is basic algebra. Unless you're taking/ focusing on physical chemistry, then you need calculus I-III..but who uses that shit? ((P-chem is trash).

Was that ironic, or don't you understand chemistry either?

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Was that ironic, or don't you understand chemistry either?

Yes, I know physical chemistry is fundamental in explaining and understanding alot of phenomena in chemistry..but beyond that I dont see any application to it in the real world. I believe organic chemistry is far more resourceful to the "average" chemist than is calculating the vibrational force of an atom.

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Yes, I know physical chemistry is fundamental in explaining and understanding alot of phenomena in chemistry..but beyond that I dont see any application to it in the real world.

 

 

Protein folding

Gene transcription

Computational chemistry for in-silico drug discovery

...

 

Just a few very important real-world applications off the top of my head.

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Yes, I know physical chemistry is fundamental in explaining and understanding alot of phenomena in chemistry..but beyond that I dont see any application to it in the real world. I believe organic chemistry is far more resourceful to the "average" chemist than is calculating the vibrational force of an atom.

Thanks for the clarification : it wasn't irony- you just don't understand chemistry.

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