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Fictional Elements.


Edward
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How many can you think of (and name with properties).

 

Anamantium (not spelled right) From X-Men A very shiny non mallibule non corrsive mettal that is virtually industrucitiable and once forged cannot be destroyed.

 

Naquada From SG-1 Non radioactive highley reactive super heavy element looks like grafite.

 

Naqaudria SG-1 same as naquada but more reactive and is more unstable.

 

Maclarium SG-1 does not exist in nature atomic weight over 200 most likley non radioactive.

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it's the isotope of hydrogen known as H3, yes.

 

Anamantium=adamantium actually

 

"Anamantium (not spelled right) From X-Men A very shiny non mallibule non corrsive mettal that is virtually industrucitiable and once forged cannot be destroyed.

probably a transition metal related to osmium, iridium, tungsten

 

Naquada From SG-1 Non radioactive highley reactive super heavy element looks like grafite.

probably ununquadium

 

Naqaudria SG-1 same as naquada but more reactive and is more unstable.

probably below ununquadium

 

Maclarium SG-1 does not exist in nature atomic weight over 200 most likley non radioactive.

inconceivable based on the fact that it is not found in nature AND it's NOT radioactive"

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Oh yeah, What about the Bob Lazar guy who claimed Ununpentium could actually exist without decaying instantly.

 

 

Bob lazar is the owner of unitednuclear.com and does pyrotechnic shows in desert blast.

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...if any of these 'exotic' transuranic elements exist, then they would have been spotted in stellar spectra - even very short 1/2 life ones like Al26 have been detected, so if thre were any >115 atomic no. elements, I wuold have guessed they would have been found, albeit fleetingly!

my 2 femtograms worth....

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In order to get nuclei of that weight, you need to fuse very large atoms together. A star only produces atoms of any appreciable weight when it is collapsing into a supernova. So I am fairly confident that even in the far reaches of space, elements >115 don't exist.

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In order to get nuclei of that weight, you need to fuse very large atoms together. A star only produces atoms of any appreciable weight when it is collapsing into a supernova. So I am fairly confident that even in the far reaches of space, elements >115 don't exist.

 

Yep, as a astrophysics student I concur. Even if they had short 1/2 lives, I suspect we'd detect the daughter nuclei?

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Yeah, the claim to have discovered element 118 has been retracted because the group that submitted the discovery realized that they misread their data. They were also unable to reproduce their results, so they have retracted all statements about the discovery.

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