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Moon's Visibility


B. John Jones
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Is the moon not always visible from someplace where it's night? I pointed out in another thread, that although the moon is quite often visible during the day, it must also be visible at one and the same time, from someplace dark, which should correspond to some ancient accounts.


And probably, the moon goes where it's light is needed most--perhaps having to do with the sunlight being more obscured or less. I would further guess that the position and corresponding fullness of the moon would be placed in a way optimizing the light for those regions of the earth during their night times.

Edited by B. John Jones
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Is the moon not always visible from someplace where it's night?

 

 

The moon is not always visible. Immediately before new moon, it is invisible.

 

 

 

I pointed out in another thread, that although the moon is quite often visible during the day, it must also be visible at one and the same time, from someplace dark, which should correspond to some ancient accounts.

 

If the moon is high in the day sky (which it often is) then It might be visible from somewhere where it is twilight, but not where it is dark.

 

 

 

And probably, the moon goes where it's light is needed most--perhaps having to do with the sunlight being more or less obscured.

 

Er, no. The moon has no choice about where to go. Are you suggesting that the moon might move because the Sun is obscured by clouds? But (apart from the fact that the moon can't do that) then the moon would be obscured by clouds as well.

 

If the moon is high in the sky at midday, it can hardly be there because its light is needed.

(1) It won't be reflecting any light because the Sun will be behind it

(2) It is midday so there is no shortage of sunlight.

(3) When the moon is in the sky at midday, sometimes you get an eclipse where the moon blocks sunlight - the exact opposite of what you claim.

 

 

 

I would further guess that the position and corresponding fullness of the moon would be placed in a way optimizing the light for those regions of the earth.

 

So your guess is obviously wrong. Maybe you should learn a little about the orbits of the Earth and the Moon before making wild guesses.

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Is the moon not always visible from someplace where it's night? I pointed out in another thread, that although the moon is quite often visible during the day, it must also be visible at one and the same time, from someplace dark, which should correspond to some ancient accounts.

No. At the point of the new moon, you have to be able to see the sun to see the moon (most obvious when we have an eclipse), so it is, by definition, not night.

 

And probably, the moon goes where it's light is needed most--perhaps having to do with the sunlight being more obscured or less. I would further guess that the position and corresponding fullness of the moon would be placed in a way optimizing the light for those regions of the earth during their night times.

The moon isn't "placed", so this is moot.

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Is the moon not always visible from someplace where it's night? I pointed out in another thread, that although the moon is quite often visible during the day, it must also be visible at one and the same time, from someplace dark, which should correspond to some ancient accounts.

And probably, the moon goes where it's light is needed most--perhaps having to do with the sunlight being more obscured or less. I would further guess that the position and corresponding fullness of the moon would be placed in a way optimizing the light for those regions of the earth during their night times.

 

 

 

The moon is not always visible. Immediately before new moon, it is invisible.

 

What I mean is, at a given time, the moon may be visible from over the horizon where it is night, while it's not visible locally, where it is also night.

 

 

If the moon is high in the day sky (which it often is) then It might be visible from somewhere where it is twilight, but not where it is dark.

 

Are you sure? Is this notion corroborated somewhere online?

 

Er, no. The moon has no choice about where to go. Are you suggesting that the moon might move because the Sun is obscured by clouds? But (apart from the fact that the moon can't do that) then the moon would be obscured by clouds as well.

 

I'm suggesting the moon follows darkness to provide light on earth where needed.

 

If the moon is high in the sky at midday, it can hardly be there because its light is needed.

 

The earth's need for light might be very sensitive, relative to seasons, ecosystems, etc., perhaps just slightly more light, at twilight for example, at a certain time in earth's history, at a certain location.

 

(1) It won't be reflecting any light because the Sun will be behind it

 

Of course it reflects light or you wouldn't see it. The sun's rays are under earth's shadow, but the moon is above the earth to an extent to catch the rays just missing horizon.

 

(2) It is midday so there is no shortage of sunlight.

 

Again, time and ecosystems are very sensitive.

 

(3) When the moon is in the sky at midday, sometimes you get an eclipse where the moon blocks sunlight - the exact opposite of what you claim.

 

In those cases, the moon makes night of day. As it continues his course, the moon is visible at dawn or dusk, someplace. No, I don't have a source, so I say this in my best estimation. In any case, for the most part, the moon follows the darkness. He appears more often at night.

 

So your guess is obviously wrong. Maybe you should learn a little about the orbits of the Earth and the Moon before making wild guesses.

 

Really? So the moon does not appear far more often at night than at day? I would bet that most of the moon's light-time or lumens on earth is spent where night is darkest.

And why then is it usually visible during night-time, and only sometimes at day? Answer? He's smart (the moon)!

No. At the point of the new moon, you have to be able to see the sun to see the moon (most obvious when we have an eclipse), so it is, by definition, not night.

 

So it's at an interval. But somewhere over the horizon, east, south, west or north, it's not new moon, but it's nighttime, or dawn or dusk, and you can see the moon.

 

 

The moon isn't "placed", so this is moot.

 

Would you cite that please?

Edited by B. John Jones
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What I mean is, at a given time, the moon may be visible from over the horizon where it is night, while it's not visible locally, where it is also night.

 

 

 

Are you sure? Is this notion corroborated somewhere online?

 

 

I'm suggesting the moon follows darkness to provide light on earth where needed.

 

 

The earth's need for light might be very sensitive, relative to seasons, ecosystems, etc., perhaps just slightly more light, at twilight for example, at a certain time in earth's history, at a certain location.

 

 

Of course it reflects light or you wouldn't see it. The sun's rays are under earth's shadow, but the moon is above the earth to an extent to catch the rays just missing horizon.

 

 

Again, time and ecosystems are very sensitive.

 

 

In those cases, the moon makes night of day. As it continues his course, the moon is visible at dawn or dusk, someplace. No, I don't have a source, so I say this in my best estimation. In any case, for the most part, the moon follows the darkness. He appears more often at night.

 

 

Really? So the moon does not appear far more often at night than at day? I would bet that most of the moon's light-time on earth is spent where night is darkest.

 

 

Up until now I have taken you seriously despite your displays of ignorance but all you need do is google the moon and see how wrong you are. In fact I would say almost certainly that you know the moon orbits the earth in roughly 28 days and at times it would be lost in the glare of the sun and so not visible. The moon is often visible during parts of the day but it is so lost in the glare of the sun few people take notice. Get yourself a globe and a smaller ball and use them as visual aids.

 

Not to scale on orbital distance:

 

 

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The moon isn't "placed", so this is moot.

 

Citation please?

 

[i had to]

 

 

Up until now I have taken you seriously despite your displays of ignorance but all you need do is google the moon and see how wrong you are. In fact I would say almost certainly that you know the moon orbits the earth in roughly 28 days and at times it would be lost in the glare of the sun and so not visible. The moon is often visible during parts of the day but it is so lost in the glare of the sun few people take notice. Get yourself a globe and a smaller ball and use them as visual aids.

 

It's been said wisely, "answer your neighbor who insults you with wisdom, sometimes mere motions, sometimes life." In this case I'll answer you should see the anterior first. What's beyond the earth? The moon? Beyond the moon? Some depth of darkness? And beyond the darkness? Many stellar lights, quite intense to pierce through the darkness. So what would be behind the earth? The sun? But the sun's rays are striking the moon aren't they, not too distant. Where on earth are you? And where am I?

 

https://www.youtube.com/embed/Zi6FkABFcQY

Edited by B. John Jones
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Citation please?

 

[i had to]

 

It's been said wisely, "answer your neighbor who insults you with wisdom, sometimes mere motions, sometimes life." In this case I'll answer you should see the anterior first. What's beyond the earth? The moon? Beyond the moon? Some depth of darkness? And beyond the darkness? Many penetrations, quite intense to pierce through the darkness. So what would be behind the earth? The sun? But the sun's rays are striking the moon aren't they, not too distant. Where on earth are you? And where am I?

 

 

 

<iframe width="640" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Zi6FkABFcQY"frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

 

Nonsensical word salad, just what I would expect...

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Nonsensical word salad, just what I would expect...

 

"Word salad," by definition is the use of words semantically incorrect. So which word's meaning is confused here? It should be noted, "penetrations," was edited to "stellar lights."

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Buy some tide tables.

They tell you that we know, in advance, where the moon will be.

"Where the moon will be," is insufficient. You need to know from what places it will be visible, and invisible, during those places' night-times and day-times, which are always numerous.

Edited by B. John Jones
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"Where the moon will be," is insufficient. You need to know from what places it will be visible, and invisible, during those places' night-times and day-times, which are always numerous.

 

There are many planetarium programs that will tell you the position of the Moon and its phase as seen from any position on the Earth for many years in the future (and past). I am not sure on the long term accuracy, but you can predict the position of the Moon with good accuracy for many hundreds if not thousands of years.

 

You should google 'free planetarium' or something similar. The one I used to use is no longer free for trial.

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"Where the moon will be," is insufficient. You need to know from what places it will be visible, and invisible, during those places' night-times and day-times, which are always numerous.

 

 

Er, that is based on where it will be. (Apart from clouds, which are irrelevant.)

What I mean is, at a given time, the moon may be visible from over the horizon where it is night, while it's not visible locally, where it is also night.

 

I'm sorry. I don't know what that means.

 

 

 

Are you sure? Is this notion corroborated somewhere online?

 

It is simple geometry. If the moon is somewhere between you and the sun, then it is not visible from the somewhere where the sun is not visible (aka "night")

 

 

 

I'm suggesting the moon follows darkness to provide light on earth where needed.

 

And I am explaining why you are wrong.

 

 

 

The earth's need for light might be very sensitive, relative to seasons, ecosystems, etc., perhaps just slightly more light, at twilight for example, at a certain time in earth's history, at a certain location.

 

Doesn't matter. The moon goes round like clockwork unaffected by the ecosystems need for light.

 

 

 

Of course it reflects light or you wouldn't see it. The sun's rays are under earth's shadow, but the moon is above the earth to an extent to catch the rays just missing horizon.

 

If the sun is above you at midday and the moon is also above you at midday, then the sunlit side of the moon will be facing away form you and the moon will be dark. In the extreme case, the moon will be between you and the sun, causing an eclipse (a total lack of light).

 

 

 

Again, time and ecosystems are very sensitive.

 

Irrelevant because:

1) The moon does not move according to the ecosystem's requirements

2) As explained above, the light side of the moon will be facing g away from Earth and so it will be providing no extra light.

 

 

 

In those cases, the moon makes night of day. As it continues his course, the moon is visible at dawn or dusk, someplace. No, I don't have a source, so I say this in my best estimation. In any case, for the most part, the moon follows the darkness. He appears more often at night.

 

That doesn't make much sense. And it is wrong. The moon is mostly visible at night, partly because the lightness of the daytime sky makes it hard to see. But it spends half its time in the day sky and half in the night sky.

 

 

 

And why then is it usually visible during night-time, and only sometimes at day? Answer? He's smart (the moon)!

 

See above.

 

 

 

So it's at an interval. But somewhere over the horizon, east, south, west or north, it's not new moon, but it's nighttime, or dawn or dusk, and you can see the moon.

 

If it is new moon , and the moon is completely dark, then it is new moon everywhere and the moon is completely dark everywhere - and only (potentially) visible* where it is daytime (or twilight).

 

* I think you can sometimes see the new moon by reflected Earthlight

Edited by Strange
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Citation please?

 

 

Cute. It's your claim that it is, so it's your burden of proof.

 

Er, that is based on where it will be. (Apart from clouds, which are irrelevant.)

 

 

Relevant to the nonsensical argument, though. What good is light from the moon if it's blocked by clouds. The clouds need to be placed, too.

 

What a load of bollocks.

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You should google 'free planetarium' or something similar. The one I used to use is no longer free for trial.

 

Fascinating. Is there something like this at the molecular level, as you would observe any kind of matter through a microscope? And an electron microscope?

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