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Bleach vs Blood research


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So what would happen if you introduced blood to bleach

 

Set one

 

Blood samples-

Blood infected with staph(Mrsa)

Blood infected with bacteria(Puss of infected cut)

Blood infected with a virus(Cold)

 

Set two

 

Now what if you introduced it to creatures that drank blood

 

Mosquito

Spider

Tick

Leaches

 

Set 3

 

Now what would happen if introduced to a mammal?

 

Its known that you are not suppose to ingest bleach. Bleach is suppose to be a very strong base but people have also bathed in bleach. However what would happen if injected straight into the blood stream?

 

Disclaimer:

I obviously not going to try this on everything living but given the fact this is a science forum I thought we could speculate what happens when you introduce bleach to blood.

 

Though set one is probably pretty harmless and doable

 

 

I got the idea from this video, but this is peroxide

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCOOULOL1vU

Edited by ThinkingMind
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First of all, injecting bleach is not safe. Typical concentrations of hypchlorite used for disinfection are around 5-6%. Injecting about 1 ml in something human-sized is probably not lethal but will have serious toxic effects. For mice it is well in the lethal range.

For your first set, the blood does not matter. Its actions of disinfection are independent of blood. And it is indeed routinely used to clean up blood spills.

Note that pus is not bacterial in origin (although produced during inflammation). Also you are aware that S. aureus are also bacteria, right? If you are thinking in terms of resistances, they are against antibiotics. Bleac as well as ethanol work differently (though certain differences in the cell hull make certain species more resilient).

 

For killing anything with bleach it is a matter of concentration. There is little connection whether they feed on blood or not. If you think to increase the concentration of bleach in the bloodstream so that it gets sterilized you are certainly killing the host.

 

Also, the strong reaction you see is due to the actions of a group of proteins in the blood with hydrogen peroxide which is quite unrelated to the actions of hypchlorite in this context.

Edited by CharonY
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First of all, injecting bleach is not safe. Typical concentrations of hypchlorite used for disinfection are around 5-6%. Injecting about 1 ml in something human-sized is probably not lethal but will have serious toxic effects. For mice it is well in the lethal range.

For your first set, the blood does not matter. Its actions of disinfection are independent of blood. And it is indeed routinely used to clean up blood spills.

Note that pus is not bacterial in origin (although produced during inflammation). Also you are aware that S. aureus are also bacteria, right? If you are thinking in terms of resistances, they are against antibiotics. Bleac as well as ethanol work differently (though certain differences in the cell hull make certain species more resilient).

 

For killing anything with bleach it is a matter of concentration. There is little connection whether they feed on blood or not. If you think to increase the concentration of bleach in the bloodstream so that it gets sterilized you are certainly killing the host.

 

Also, the strong reaction you see is due to the actions of a group of proteins in the blood with hydrogen peroxide which is quite unrelated to the actions of hypchlorite in this context.

 

For the blood drinking creatures I wanted to know if bleach in the blood would infect them somehow. Like it would be the same as injecting bleach into a person stomach, but than the added affect that these creatures eat blood. So you have to take into account the blood reaction along with how the creatures body would adapt to it.

 

If you inject bleach into a Tick will it die? Humans have gotten sick from ingesting infected food before too. Which also goes into another idea. If you can put some kind of chemical into your blood that wont kill you, but is deadly to parasites would you be immune to ticks and mosquito? Since your blood would kill or otherwise deter them?

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Bleach is a chemical and therefore cannot infect anything. Do you mean affect? Either way, the only difference is the route (oral vs injection). The fact that the ingestion is blood does not matter much.

 

 

If you inject bleach into a Tick will it die?

Depends on the concentration.

 

 

If you can put some kind of chemical into your blood that wont kill you, but is deadly to parasites would you be immune to ticks and mosquito? Since your blood would kill or otherwise deter them?

 

If there was something like that, maybe. But the issue is that toxic components would affect you.

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Bleach is a chemical and therefore cannot infect anything. Do you mean affect? Either way, the only difference is the route (oral vs injection). The fact that the ingestion is blood does not matter much.

 

Depends on the concentration.

 

 

If there was something like that, maybe. But the issue is that toxic components would affect you.

I did mean affect

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In that case, as I said, it is a matter of concentration. And injecting it into the bloodstream means diluting it. There is little difference for the toxic effect if diluted by water or by blood (actually some component may have some minor effects, but overall it will negligible). And if your thought is having a sufficiently high concentration to harm organisms that feed on blood, then you are going to kill the host first.

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