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Diarrohea, why in large intestine blood and mucus?


scilearner
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Diarrhoea is due to intestinal inflammation preventing water absorption in the large intestine. I'm not sure if this is OT but related: uniform-ish black stools mean perforation of some type above the large intestine because the blood has had a chance to be mixed and partially digested. by the time you see it but colon-originating stool issues will be blood-streaked and red because no mixing has occurred or enough time for it to turn black.

Edited by StringJunky
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  • 2 months later...

I've not read of this distinction in the past... Form of the diarrhoea probably relates more to the type of exotoxin being secreted. Eg. Cholera toxin will induce cAmp production and chloride secretion leading rice water stool. Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli releases verotoxin to inhibit protein synthesis to cause bloody diarrhoea and HUS.

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I've not read of this distinction in the past... Form of the diarrhoea probably relates more to the type of exotoxin being secreted. Eg. Cholera toxin will induce cAmp production and chloride secretion leading rice water stool. Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli releases verotoxin to inhibit protein synthesis to cause bloody diarrhoea and HUS.

I'm not saying what the causes are but likely indicators to their source location.

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It may be better to ask about forms of stool because diarrhoea typical refers to some form of infective gastroenteritis.

Ps I was referring to the distinction made by the op in the original post. i understand your explanation, he/she seems to be talking about diarrhoea from different bowel locations being mucous or bloody, which doesn't ring a bell.

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It may be better to ask about forms of stool because diarrhoea typical refers to some form of infective gastroenteritis.

Ps I was referring to the distinction made by the op in the original post. i understand your explanation, he/she seems to be talking about diarrhoea from different bowel locations being mucous or bloody, which doesn't ring a bell.

Ok. Yes, I can't see how blood and mucus sourced at the small intestine would remain visibly distinct as such once it exited; it

would have been denatured by digestive substances and mixed up more, via peristalsis, in transit..

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Yeah blood in the stool from the upper GI tract is typically mixed in, called malaena. Blood from lower Gi is typically described as streaky and coating the stool, splashing the pan.

 

OP is talking about diarrhoea though, it is usually regarded as a separate clinical problem then blood in the stool. The point I was trying to make was, watery vs. bloody diarrhoea may be a function of the pathogenic agent rather than the location of bowel. Vibrio diarrhoea will probably look different to Shigella vs campylobacter.

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Yeah blood in the stool from the upper GI tract is typically mixed in, called malaena. Blood from lower Gi is typically described as streaky and coating the stool, splashing the pan.

 

OP is talking about diarrhoea though, it is usually regarded as a separate clinical problem then blood in the stool. The point I was trying to make was, watery vs. bloody diarrhoea may be a function of the pathogenic agent rather than the location of bowel. Vibrio diarrhoea will probably look different to Shigella vs campylobacter.

Right.... Ive learnt a bit more. :)

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