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The dynamics of a Volcano.


Dr. Funkenstein
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Science agrees that lava pushed through the surface of the crust by gas, is the process for volcano's. This seems to suggest that the lava is already in place/in motion, or that perhaps the lava is on escape from the outer/inner core of the planet.This view doesn't prove itself, since the outer core is said to be made of molten metals (2) and the inner core of molten metal (1). The lava eruption however is proven to be igneous rock.

 

Safe then to hypothesis, that Lava does not come from the core's. So either it's everywhere and self sustaining, waiting for a gaseous release, or it is formed through a process. I would think that it is formed, perhaps by a gaseous release of the outer core, interacting with material of the Mantle, maybe Carbon/Hydrocarbons, This gas is of such a high temperature that it turns Carbon deposit into lava. So the gas along with the gas release from the liquefying of Carbon, vents to the crust, causing volcanic eruptions.

 

In the case of Diamonds, dense carbon atoms under the pressure of the gas to mantle, solidify, as do some minerals, and somehow escape the liquefy process.

 

 

 

 

 

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Science agrees that lava pushed through the surface of the crust by gas, is the process for volcano's.

Not all eruptions are driven by gases. Types of Volcanic Eruptions

 

This seems to suggest that the lava is already in place/in motion, or that perhaps the lava is on escape from the outer/inner core of the planet.

Technically, molten rock that has erupted is lava and un-erupted molten rock is magma. Magma originates in the mantle, not the core.

 

 

Safe then to hypothesis, that Lava does not come from the core's. So either it's everywhere and self sustaining, waiting for a gaseous release, or it is formed through a process. I would think that it is formed, perhaps by a gaseous release of the outer core, interacting with material of the Mantle, maybe Carbon/Hydrocarbons, This gas is of such a high temperature that it turns Carbon deposit into lava. So the gas along with the gas release from the liquefying of Carbon, vents to the crust, causing volcanic eruptions.

 

In the case of Diamonds, dense carbon atoms under the pressure of the gas to mantle, solidify, as do some minerals, and somehow escape the liquefy process.

 

Nothing but hot gas in the spoiler. What is your point? Honestly, most of what you have written is wrong and all of it uniformed. Do some reading.
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Hi there Dr. Funkenstein!

 

1) I think that science generally agrees that magma (it's not lava until it gets to the surface) moves up simply due to a density difference between the molten material of upper mantle and the Earth's generally solid crust. It's also generally not pushed though, it only comes up when there is an opportunity in the form of a crack, fault or some other sort of fracture. Until that moment the pressure of magma is generally not big enough to break surrounding hard rock and it gets accumulated in deep magma chambers. If no opportunity arises it just slowly solidifies over the course of millions of years and sometimes you can see results of this in the form of batoliths.

 

2) Now as far as gases are concerned, at high pressures of the upper mantle, even if material is partially or completely molten, the solubility of gases in the magma is huge. It is partially offset by the increase in temperature which decreases solubility, but the temperature rises slower than pressure as you go down. It's only when magma is approaching surface and the pressure drops significantly that de-gasification of magma begins.

 

3) Magma is not coming from the core. Except for small bits in the very upper part Earth's mantle is very much solid. Also it's general idea that heavy elements (iron and nickel) of which core mostly consists tend to slowly drift towards the center of the Earth, not the other way around due to gravitational forces.

 

4) Liquid magma forms either in so-called "hot spots" (Hawaii being a prime example), where a strong thermal flux is observed or in areas (subduction zones) where silicon-rich (and thus having lower melting point) material is present at the normal temperatures/pressures of the upper mantle.

 

And I can't really comment on hydrocarbons being in contact with Mantle material because it just doesn't happen if only in minuscule amounts.

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Magma is formed by a melting process -- it is not everywhere! One can look at the chemistry and the petrology of the rocks and minerals to learn about the source of the magma and the processes it has been through.

 

As acme states there are many types of volcanic eruptive styles.

 

I'm no volcanologist, but: The traditional view is of a volcano sitting above a magma chamber. Melt feeds into the magma chamber from below, sits there, and every so often the pressure builds up to the point where it blows. In reality it's a bit more complicated than that, every volcano is different, there can be a network of chambers in some sort of plumbing configuration and many factors come into play when it comes to the eruption. The science has progressed a lot to the point now where we can predict volcanic eruptions (on some volcanoes) with some accuracy provided with good monitoring data. The dynamics of a volcano is a complex and active research area ...

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Greetings, Pavelcherepan.

 

explanation 1 is a non issue, Magma in the mantle, lava at eruptions terminology aside they are one in the same. If we say Magma is floating around within the mantle, then my question would be how does it get to be Magma? Science say's there are two types of Magma

 

1. Primary

2.Parental

 

They both originate within the Mantle, they both are melts due to Heat and pressure, this original post suggested that the heat and pressure stems from contact of some portion of the mantle, with the Outer core, In the case of rich organic sediment, which is taken as Oil out of the mantle/crust area, I think the heat and pressure applied may not be of the same degree as the interaction between inner core and Mantle.

 

Solubility of gas to Magma, the same gas that produced the magma through heat and pressure, is the only engine, for eruption. It cant just dissipate, because that would defy the laws of Thermodynamics, if the heat from gas melts the thing then obviously there will be more heat.

 

As to the hot spots, I don't know. It seems plausible that Carbon within the mantle is turned to magma, with interaction with the outer core, and existing pathways within the mantle allows it to move, and Gas pushes it along.

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They both originate within the Mantle, they both are melts due to Heat and pressure, this original post suggested that the heat and pressure stems from contact of some portion of the mantle, with the Outer core, ....

I had this concept that melting would be due to heat and loss of pressure. The Inner Core of the Earth is solid due partly to the intense pressure. With much less pressure at the same temperature it would liquify.

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They both originate within the Mantle, they both are melts due to Heat and pressure, this original post suggested that the heat and pressure stems from contact of some portion of the mantle, with the Outer core, In the case of rich organic sediment, which is taken as Oil out of the mantle/crust area, I think the heat and pressure applied may not be of the same degree as the interaction between inner core and Mantle.

 

Yes. Lower mantle is in direct contact with the outer core. No. None of the material produced by volcanic eruptions originates from Outer Core or Lower Mantle. And, for that matter, no organic material is or is ever likely to come in contact with the outer core.

 

 

 

Solubility of gas to Magma, the same gas that produced the magma through heat and pressure, is the only engine, for eruption. It cant just dissipate, because that would defy the laws of Thermodynamics, if the heat from gas melts the thing then obviously there will be more heat.

 

Again, no. The only mechanism for eruptions is the positive buoyancy of magma surrounded by solid rock. Gas has nothing to do with it. At the pressures of the upper mantle all gas is dissolved in magma.

 

 

 

As to the hot spots, I don't know. It seems plausible that Carbon within the mantle is turned to magma, with interaction with the outer core, and existing pathways within the mantle allows it to move, and Gas pushes it along.

 

Why do you insist there should always be carbon? Oxygen, magnesium, silicon, iron, calcium, aluminium, sodium and potassium constitute 99.7% of mantle by weight. There is really no carbon to speak of.

 

Just to re-iterate, you seem to have an idea that volcanic material originates from zone of contact between lower mantle and outer core. It doesn't. There is no evidence from seismic studies that anything of sorts takes place. The entirety of mantle (except for bits in the upper part) is rock-solid with viscosities of around 1021 Pa*s. There is no magma there. Nor there is any carbon.

 

EDIT: Check out this article which has elemental composition of mantle for all major elements down to as little as 0.009 ppm. Still no carbon.

Edited by pavelcherepan
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