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Help !!! I need to be certain

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I am 31 yrs old and I am able to do almost anything I put my mind to , however I am a high school drop out , My 4th grader and I always do the science fair , from filters to taste of the tongue , to wind turbines , This year we have taken a MOT and added 9v worth of power to the primary voila electro magnet , she did the safe work , and recorded data , I want to make sure the data is right and her to learn from this. I hate variables when defined as independent and dependent and control , I can easily spot them in any example unless its for a project we have done . PLEASE help ,We added a base to mot , put a handle on it and hooked up 9v to leads , used voltage meter to maintain same voltage , same brand batteries, we added barbells to see what weight this electromag could lift ,I TOPIC ! so im sure independent variable would be the weight , I think dependent would be how much weight or did magnet lift y/n ? and the control ? hell only thing we changed was the weight each time , it lifted up to 200 before it lost magnetic bond if your wondering lol her hypo was wrong she thought it would lift inbetween 50-100 .I know this isn't the Higgs Boson , and Im not cheating and If we get it wrong its not about place , we have done fine on are own so far , its about the learning part !!! please help , I will make her identify and explain to her if I know the right answers , and im out of time ! thank you Dirtywhiteboy


This is MOT converted electromagnet


Common Please

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Your post is such chaotic.. What is question?

Strength of magnetic field depends on flowing current, measured in amperes.

Q=I*t
Q/e is quantity of electrons.
So if you have I=1 A, t=1s,there is 6.24*10^18 electrons flowing per second.

Plug some ampere meter on wire between electromagnet & batteries, to see it's value.
Also plug some variable resistor/potentiometer
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potentiometer
to be able change resistance thus flowing current.
I=U/R

Then compare mass with different setting of potentiometer. Read ampere from ampere meter.

Edited by Sensei

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The question was , simply put , I have a hard time identifying dependent and independent variables , and the control . There is no control group . It was 4 in the morning when I posted my query ! The electromagnet we made from the microwave oven transformer works fine , it is ran on 9v , which are constant until connected to the coil and under load. I was trying to list all my variables about are experiment , luckily it iced last night and my daughters school was cancelled /science fair postponed for a day. The experiment was a success , her title was How much weight can my electromagnet lift , we kept the voltage at 9v to keep the results from varying , and I listed what I thought was all variables and control , to which this post was all about , she is in 4th grade so we used weight and gravity to estimate the force to break the bond , the mathematics , greatly appreciated will do us no good . I know it sounds crazy but I cannot identify these variables when we do are own experiment ! Sorry if I am confusing , lack of sleep , and lots of work have my head spinning


Electromagnet 2.0 , I can build anything ,but when it comes to elementary education im lost ! Internet says I need a placebo , and Newton says it hurts when random apples fall from the sky !

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