Jump to content

Light speed travel


Obnoxious
 Share

Recommended Posts

This is Special Relativity's equation for time dilation, where t' is the fraction of t that is dilated, v is velocity and c is the speed of light.

 

[math]t' = {t\over\sqrt{1-{(v^2/c^2)}}[/math]

 

In this case, plugging numbers for [math]v[/math] higher than [math]c[/math] return an undefined solution.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If we shine a flash light, aren't we traveling at C relative to the beam of light shot out from the flash light?
Light always travels at the speed of light.

 

So just how does that time diliation equation stuff work?
Light always travels at the speed of light. Time dilation concerns changes in space-time, changes in space affecting time. An object cannot be subject to time dilation with respect to itself or with respect to light. There must be some other object in space-time with which to relate it.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You measure your speed with respect to some other object. But typically you refer to yourself as being at rest, and measure other speeds relative to you. Your own clock never dilates in your own frame. It's always the other guy's clock.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can't measure your speed relative to light. You start at rest- light is moving towards you at 3x10^8m/s. You move forward at a velocity of 1.5x10^8m/s. You measure the velocity of the light coming at you to confirm your velocity... and find lights velocity to be unchanged. c never changes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is Special Relativity's equation for time dilation' date=' where t' is the fraction of t that is dilated, v is velocity and c is the speed of light.

 

[math']t' = {t\over\sqrt{1-{(v^2/c^2)}}[/math]

 

In this case, plugging numbers for [math]v[/math] higher than [math]c[/math] return an undefined solution.

not undefined, imaginary. c would make time undefined.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, okay, suppose this situation:

You are in the absolute empty space, there is nothing but emptiness, suddenly, a hippo appears out of nowhere. How fast is it going? If you said zero, well, how do you know? You can't measure how fast he is going because there's nothing to measure it from. Similarily, if I shined a beam of light from where I am standing right now, I am traveling at exactly C relative to the light beam, so just how exactly does that equation work?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Similarily, if I shined a beam of light from where I am standing right now, I am traveling at exactly C relative to the light beam, so just how exactly does that equation work?

 

The photons would observe you (if that's even possible) as being completely dialated in space and time. You would be 2-D and not feel the effects of time. In fact, this is how photons observe ALL matter. Since photons observe everything to be identical and unchanging, it's not really a reference frame with any use!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The understanding is supposed to be that anything that travels faster than the speed of light will become infinitely mass which would in turn require infinite propulsion or what ever. (I'm not up on the terms)

 

But what if like 2 magnets repelling each other could there be a way to repel mass coming from the front of a spaceship so as to not accumulate the mass? (Hope I worded that right) Thereby allowing it to pass the Light Speed Barrier?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But what if like 2 magnets repelling each other could there be a way to repel mass coming from the front of a spaceship so as to not accumulate the mass? (Hope I worded that right) Thereby allowing it to pass the Light Speed Barrier?

 

Almost certainly not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But what if like 2 magnets repelling each other could there be a way to repel mass coming from the front of a spaceship so as to not accumulate the mass? (Hope I worded that right) Thereby allowing it to pass the Light Speed Barrier?
I believe you have the wrong notion here. The gain in mass is intrinsic, not extrinsic. That is, the object itself becomes more massive because of its speed, not because it acquires mass externally.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.