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Is Extracting Methane From A Cows Stomach Too Invasive?


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My buddy and I were discussing this issue. He thinks that it is cruel to the cow and there should be less invasive methods.

My response was; "If I were a cow and I could rid the world of some greenhouse gasses, and give fuel to people who need it, which would ultimately be helping to save the planet, I'd take a probing". Of course I wouldn't enjoy it, but I'd find it more acceptable than our current alternatives.

What do you all think?

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Ethically, who am I to deny any creature a good probing? "Invasive" is a human perspective, and not one that translates well to other species.

 

Does the sheep feel better after all that wool weight is "invasively" removed? What if the cow feels better without all the extra gas? I'm not up to speed on the methodology, but it's doubtful people like the Argentinians, who rely on a reputation for great beef, would ever do anything to upset their cattle with anything painful or stressful, especially if it's attached to them most of the day.

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Methane does not form in the stomach of the cow. It forms in its intestines.

 

As wikipedia puts it:

 

 

Flatus (intestinal gas) is mostly produced as a byproduct of bacterial fermentation in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, especially the colon.

 

Methane will exit the cow all by itself through the hole at the rear-end that was created for the purpose of excreting unwanted solid and gaseous products (poop and farts). No probing needed.

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Methane does not form in the stomach of the cow. It forms in its intestines.

 

As wikipedia puts it:

 

 

 

Methane will exit the cow all by itself through the hole at the rear-end that was created for the purpose of excreting unwanted solid and gaseous products (poop and farts). No probing needed.

Nothing is being inserted into the cows?

Edited by Pozessed
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My buddy and I were discussing this issue. He thinks that it is cruel to the cow and there should be less invasive methods.

 

My response was; "If I were a cow and I could rid the world of some greenhouse gasses, and give fuel to people who need it, which would ultimately be helping to save the planet, I'd take a probing". Of course I wouldn't enjoy it, but I'd find it more acceptable than our current alternatives.

 

What do you all think?

Well, it's easy to talk about sacrifice when you yourself don't have to take part in it.

 

But I don't think you have to be a cow, we can likely extract a little methane from humans too, so please go ahead and help save the planet.

(And remember that it would be more acceptable if you use the probing method.)

Edited by Spyman
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Well, it's easy to talk about sacrifice when you yourself don't have to take part in it.

 

But I don't think you have to be a cow, we can likely extract a little methane from humans too, so please go ahead and help save the planet.

(And remember that it would be more acceptable if you use the probing method.)

Now now, lets not presume I'm not someone who already does make sacraficies to society. I like to think I do more than many others when it comes to helping the progress of society.

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Now now, lets not presume I'm not someone who already does make sacraficies to society. I like to think I do more than many others when it comes to helping the progress of society.

Would you or would you not take a probing if it could help to save the planet?
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Nothing is being inserted into the cows?

 

Only food and water on the front end. Well, it's not really being 'inserted'. The cow eats and drinks it.

 

I guess if you want to capture the methane (which is an amazing 250-500 liters per day - pdf warning), you'd have to collect it. One problem is that the methane comes out of both ends (burp and fart). But since the front end is used for breaching too, collecting anything there may be slightly problematic, and the methane is probably too much diluted by air to be of any use. Likewise, on the backend, the hole is a multitasking hole. Any probe or other collection device risks getting blocked by cow poo.

 

I do not have a design to prevent all these problems though. Sorry. No solutions from me today.

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We will be revered as visiting aliens.

 

 

Yes. A tube into the rumen.

 

http://blogs.scienceforums.net/swansont/archives/14869

Yea, that's what I was referring to when I made this thread. I saw the article on an NBC web page, but it was about the same story.

I noticed it here as well and gave you a G+ 1 for it Swansont.

Would you or would you not take a probing if it could help to save the planet?

If it could, no. If it would, yes. I still wouldn't enjoy it. I'm also not going to be able to produce anywhere near 300 litres though.

Edited by Pozessed
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So if this technology is being used by Argentina successfully on their range-fed beef, which means it can't be adversely affecting the animals, where's the ethical dilemma in extracting yet another useful, sustainable product from our domesticates?

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I think they are using fistulated cows. That would greatly increase maintenance if scaled. Looks like grains increase methane, so yet another reason to avoid feeding them grain(increases gas, sickness(more antibiotics) and lowers omega 3)

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"So if this technology is being used by Argentina successfully on their range-fed beef, which means it can't be adversely affecting the animals,"

The cows may disagree.

 

So far, none have been mooooved enough to say anything.

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