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How would the force of gravity differ in an Antimatter Universe?


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All indications from the mathematical structure of general relativity suggest there would be no difference. This is due to the equivalence principal. However, I do know that people are looking for any differences in hydrogen and antihydrogen. Check out the ALPHA experiment http://alpha.web.cern.ch/

Edited by ajb
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All indications from the mathematical structure of general relativity suggest there would be no difference. This is due to the equivalence principal. However, I do know that people are looking for any differences in hydrogen and antihydrogen. Check out the ALPHA experiment http://alpha.web.cern.ch/

Seems like (my uninformed guess) a fair bit of antihydrogen might be required to get a meaningful result. What is the most that has been produced in one place at one time?

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Seems like (my uninformed guess) a fair bit of antihydrogen might be required to get a meaningful result. What is the most that has been produced in one place at one time?

 

I think it's on order of a few thousand atoms.

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  • 3 weeks later...

My recollection is the same as swansont's, a handful of thousands of atoms. Supercooled and contained either magnetically or by some BEC effect or other. Aren't BECs coherent?

 

I think it was a National Geographic article on BECs I read it in, IIRC. Perhaps 2006 or 2005; certainly pre-mid-2007.

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How would the force of gravity differ in an Antimatter Universe?

 

It would not differ.

 

People don't understand that Antimatter is indispensable part of our Universe.

Our atmosphere is full of pion+, muon+ and positrons (result of decay of two first).

They're result of collisions of protons at relativistic velocity in upper region of atmosphere.

 

Positron is also antimatter. Antiparticle of electron.

 

The most common star fusion process is producing positrons:

 

p+ + p+ -> D+ + e+ + Ve

 

421px-FusionintheSun.svg.png

 

Also instable isotopes which have more protons than neutrons are decaying mostly through positron emission (beta decay +)

 

Each banana is emitting 15 positrons per second

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banana_equivalent_dose

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