Jump to content

New Supernova Closest in Decades


Alan McDougall
 Share

Recommended Posts

http://www.livescience.com/42791-supernova-star-explosion-amateur-photos.html?cmpid=514627_20140124_17471054

 

New supernova in the sky

 

The supernova was first observed Tuesday (Jan. 21) at 7:20 p.m. local time (19:20 UTC) by a group of students led by Steve Fossey at the University College London.

"It was a surreal and exciting experience taking images of the unidentified object as Steve ran around the observatory verifying the result," UCL student Guy Pollack said in a statement.

 

The only closer star explosion in the last three decades was Supernova 1987A, which was spotted in February 1987 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a dwarf galaxy companion of the Milky Way about 168,000 light-years from Earth. Another star explosion discovered 21 years ago, 1993J in Messier 81, was essentially at the same distance as the new supernova, said International Astronomical Union General Secretary Thierry Montmerle.

 

 

Edited by Alan McDougall
copyright
Link to comment
Share on other sites

!

Moderator Note

I have snipped the bulk of the article, because copy/pasting of entire articles is a copyright violation and this is not tolerated. Further, this is science news, and you are expected to provide a link to the article from which you are quoting.

 

http://www.livescience.com/42791-supernova-star-explosion-amateur-photos.html?cmpid=514627_20140124_17471054

 

I did not intentionally leave out the link, I had copied the article into a word document, without the link so it was an oversight on my part, not an attempt to claim any right to the article.!

 

How can it be a copyright infringement if I include the link to the article even if a copy and past most of the article?

Edited by Alan McDougall
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

http://www.livescience.com/42791-supernova-star-explosion-amateur-photos.html?cmpid=514627_20140124_17471054

 

I did not intentionally leave out the link, I had copied the article into a word document, without the link so it was an oversight on my part, not an attempt to claim any right to the article.!

 

How can it be a copyright infringement if I include the link to the article even if a copy and past most of the article?

 

How can it not be? You copied it and pasted it elsewhere. You do not own the work, so you do not have the right to do that without permission. That, in rough terms, is the modern version of copyright. The right to copy. Pasting it here in its entirety means the site that originally posted it doesn't get traffic.

 

If someone thought you were claiming the work as your own, that would be an issue of plagiarism (also against the rules, but not an issue here)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

http://www.livescience.com/42791-supernova-star-explosion-amateur-photos.html?cmpid=514627_20140124_17471054

 

I did not intentionally leave out the link, I had copied the article into a word document, without the link so it was an oversight on my part, not an attempt to claim any right to the article.!

 

How can it be a copyright infringement if I include the link to the article even if a copy and past most of the article?

 

Alan

 

You can find a short summary on fair use of copy-righted material in my particular jurisdiction the UK here:

 

http://www.copyrightservice.co.uk/copyright/p09_fair_use

 

Please bear in mind this is not necessarily the jurisdiction which will apply to SFN, that these are only guidelines, and that it is often better to be cautious and frugal rather than hopeful and generous when dealing with distributing someone else's work

 

I would say this is the bit to take note of

 

 

What does fair use allow?

Under fair use rules, it may be possible to use quotations or excerpts, where the work has been made available to the public, (i.e. published). Provided that:

  • The use is deemed acceptable under the terms of fair dealing.
  • That the quoted material is justified, and no more than is necessary is included.
  • That the source of the quoted material is mentioned, along with the name of the author.

And, per SwansonT's remarks, you copied the whole of the article and didn't reference either the author or the source. This removes the credit for the work and removes the traffic towards the site that generated the content.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

How can it not be? You copied it and pasted it elsewhere. You do not own the work, so you do not have the right to do that without permission. That, in rough terms, is the modern version of copyright. The right to copy. Pasting it here in its entirety means the site that originally posted it doesn't get traffic.

 

If someone thought you were claiming the work as your own, that would be an issue of plagiarism (also against the rules, but not an issue here)

 

 

How can it not be? You copied it and pasted it elsewhere. You do not own the work, so you do not have the right to do that without permission. That, in rough terms, is the modern version of copyright. The right to copy. Pasting it here in its entirety means the site that originally posted it doesn't get traffic.

 

If someone thought you were claiming the work as your own, that would be an issue of plagiarism (also against the rules, but not an issue here)

 

In that case must I in future use my "own subjective judgment" as to how much I can past out of an article, that did not have its origin on this site? Or restrict it to a link to an article that I think the other members might find interesting, also?. What about inviting traffic to our forum? I am not trying to be difficult just clear up some misunderstandings! smile.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The amount you can quote is not well-defined, sorry. Quote what you need to to get your point across, but certainly not the bulk of the article.

 

Generally, if you are adding your own commentary (as with a review or critique) then you can quote more of the material.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.