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curious about the moon


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I recently read that the moon has a period of 2 weeks of daytime and 2 weeks of night during which the tempatures go from hot enough to boil water to -270 F. I was wondering:

 

1) How long of a period would tempatures be between, say 60 and 85 degrees?

2) If one built an igloo how thick wouldthe ice have to be to sheild you from cosmic ray poisoning during the day? night?

3) When water boils on the moons surface how high does the steam go into the 0 atmosphere? and does the steam create a temporary high pressure zone within the 0 atmosphere? perhaps a 5" high bubble or several feet, I guess what I'm asking is what is the range in simple elemetry terms?

4) Is their any earth like soil on the moon suitable to grow plants?

 

Does anybody know if a good you tube with this kind of information?

 

I heard on ted talks that a man named William Stone is willing to pioneer an expedition to the Moon with no fuel to return, and that's not all, his plans incude a probe to look for life on one of Jupiter's moons.

 

I can't help but wonder how he plans on duing all of this.

I wonder how much oxygen a small H3 reactor could be modified to create oxygen and Hydrogen.

 

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I imagine that the ice would be likely to boil off and then float away due to the low gravity. More practically we're talking about some sort of structure. Prefab or using Lunarcrete.

 

4) Would probably use hydroponics instead. The actual soil is likely deficient in one or more ways, at the very least you would have to introduce soil microbes.

 

Probably solar based extraction and water recycling/importation will be used first. From there we can split the water into its components or use it directly. Looking at He-3 we're talking a fairly large scale mining operation and before any power generation can be done.

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I recently read that the moon has a period of 2 weeks of daytime and 2 weeks of night during which the tempatures go from hot enough to boil water to -270 F. I was wondering:

 

1) How long of a period would tempatures be between, say 60 and 85 degrees?

Hard to really say, it would depend on how dark the surface was at the spot you were measuring.

 

2) If one built an igloo how thick would the ice have to be to sheild you from cosmic ray poisoning during the day? night?

During the day ice would sublime into vapor very rapidly, since water is a poor shield for radiation it would have to be quite thick.

 

 

3) When water boils on the moons surface how high does the steam go into the 0 atmosphere? and does the steam create a temporary high pressure zone within the 0 atmosphere? perhaps a 5" high bubble or several feet, I guess what I'm asking is what is the range in simple elemetry terms?

The vapor would disperse immediately into the general atmosphere of the moon, yes the moon does have an atmosphere but it is equal to a very good vacuum on the earth.

 

4) Is their any earth like soil on the moon suitable to grow plants?

Plants have been grown in the Regolith of the moon that was brought back to earth...

 

Does anybody know if a good you tube with this kind of information?

 

I heard on ted talks that a man named William Stone is willing to pioneer an expedition to the Moon with no fuel to return, and that's not all, his plans incude a probe to look for life on one of Jupiter's moons.

I'd like to see those plans...

 

I can't help but wonder how he plans on duing all of this.

It is a mystery...

 

I wonder how much oxygen a small H3 reactor could be modified to create oxygen and Hydrogen.

I have no idea what an H3 reactor is...

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1) As no atmosphere evens temperatures out on the Moon, you can't define one temperature. It depends much on the colour and more. Proper life support must bring a good temperature, not the Moon, whatever the daytime is.

 

2) Cosmic rays don't depend on night and day. Solar rays do. Our terrestrial atmosphere is 10,000 kg/m2 thick and offers a good protection at sea level, so stones or dust 5m thick would be good. Ice would sublimate away. Esa has a very nice demonstrator to sinter regolith and make walls of it

 

3) Earth's atmosphere loses half its density at 6000m height. The Moon having about the same temperature but 1/6 the gravity, nitrogen would occupy 6*6km "height", and lighter water vapour even more.

 

4) Same info as Moontanman.

 

4 bis) While the soil isn't a difficulty, water is. It's not available on the Moon, or only with huge difficulty, and would escape immediately, so it must be confined in some huge dome. The other difficulty is our lack of knowledge for biological cycles: the last attempt, Biosphere 2, failed on Earth.

 

6) What do you call an H3 reactor? Is it tritium, 3H? Up to now anf for any foreseeable future, no deuterium-tritium reactor is operational. But Sunlight is plentiful on the Moon, better than the clearest desert on Earth. Oxygen exists in stones and regolith, hydrogen doesn't; water ice is said to await explorers in the soil at some polar locations... But in what concentration? Moving tons of soil on a remote celestial body to gain traces of frost looks inefficient.

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