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Do North American appliances use less watts?


turionx2
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I have a european 650w(220/240v) hand blender and I tried to look for an american hand blender with the same wattage however I haven't found one that reaches those wattages.

 

I did some math.

 

650w / 220v = 2,954545454545455 amps(?)

 

2,954545454545455 amps x 110v = 325 watts(?)

 

Should I be looking for a 325w-110v hand blender if I want the same power as my 650w hand blender?

 

I know I can get a step up voltage transformer/converter but they are fairly bulky and ugly.

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You would need a blender for 120 V that pulls nearly 6A to be near 650w, which is the power. 650w/120V is about 5.4A

 

We also have 220/240 V circuits for high current devices, such as electric clothes dryers.

Edited by EdEarl
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Does america use 120v ac? Power is universal, i dont see why a device with the same output would use more or less...

Yes, the US is primarily 120 powered. One difference is frequency, the US uses 60Hz; some other countries use 50Hz. Frequency affects motors primarily. Some motors will run faster on 60 Hz (and use more power) than on 50 Hz.

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You would need a blender for 120 V that pulls nearly 6A to be near 650w, which is the power. 650w/120V is about 5.4A

 

We also have 220/240 V circuits for high current devices, such as electric clothes dryers.

Since the voltage is slashed in half, shoulden't the watts and amps be slashed in half?

 

Are you sure the 4 prong 220/240v dryer socket is a true 220/240v socket and not a pseudo-120v+120v type socket? If it is a true 220/240v socket, is there an adaptor that converts the german 2 prong plug into the 4 prong clothes dryer plug?

Edited by turionx2
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Since the voltage is slashed in half, shoulden't the watts and amps be slashed in half?

Why?

 

If it is a true 220/240v socket, is there an adaptor that converts the german 2 prong plug into the 4 prong clothes dryer plug?

I have no idea what a pseudo 120v+120v socket is. If you measure the voltage on a 220/240 V socket, you get 240V. It is true, that a 240 may be divided into two 120V circuits, because ground/neutral is between the two 120V circuits.

 

If it is a true 220/240v socket, is there an adaptor that converts the german 2 prong plug into the 4 prong clothes dryer plug?

I don't know if there is a converter.
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What if I attach two 120v american cord plugs into the 240v hand blender, would this work? A "Y" type design cord with two 120v cords feeding into the 240v hand blender and the two 120v plugs into the two wall sockets.

Edited by turionx2
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What if I attach two 120v american cord plugs into the 240v hand blender, would this work? A "Y" type design cord with two 120v cords feeding into the 240v hand blender and the two 120v plugs into the two wall sockets.

If you wire them incorrectly you will get a short circuit. If the motor is not rated for 60 Hz, it may burn up. Otherwise, it might work, but you have to connect to two circuits that measure 220-240V from hot to hot wire. It is not recommended, and may invalidate your insurance if you cause a fire. I recommend you make an extension to plug into your dryer socket with a socket for your blender, because it is safer, you are guaranteed to get 220-240V, and it might not invalidate your insurance.

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What if I attach two 120v american cord plugs into the 240v hand blender, would this work? A "Y" type design cord with two 120v cords feeding into the 240v hand blender and the two 120v plugs into the two wall sockets.

If you happened to use two wall sockets that are on different phase legs then you could get 240 but that's a poor approach. Is your intent to try to run the german blender in the U.S.? If so you need to look at the blender motor for it's operating frequency. I suspect it's 50hz and U.S. power systems operate at 60 hz. This means the blender will run about 20% faster than the speed it is designed for.

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The motor is rated 50/60hz as indicated on the unit. The blender is a Philips HR1615.

 

Motor model number: 420303595981

 

EdEarl, does the thickness of the wire matter? And where can I purchase a clothes dryer cord with the 4 prong plug?

Edited by turionx2
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The motor is rated 50/60hz as indicated on the unit. The blender is a Philips HR1615.

 

Motor model number: 420303595981

 

EdEarl, does the thickness of the wire matter? And where can I purchase a clothes dryer cord with the 4 prong plug?

Yes wire size matters. You should be able to get the plug you need at a hardware store or Home Depot. You may need to order the German socket over the internet.

http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm

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Yes wire size matters. You should be able to get the plug you need at a hardware store or Home Depot. You may need to order the German socket over the internet.

http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm

 

unsure.png I am unsure about the wire size. Should I be using gauge 22?

 

Is a simple socket converter that converts the german socket to an american one fine to use? Third to the right.

 

travel-adaptor-ac-power-adapter-eu-to-us

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You would need a blender for 120 V that pulls nearly 6A to be near 650w, which is the power. 650w/120V is about 5.4A

 

We also have 220/240 V circuits for high current devices, such as electric clothes dryers.

16 AWG for 3 amps

 

Those converters look like they are for 120V.

 

I'm confused. You said that "650w/120V is about 5.4A". Where did the 3 amps come from?

 

I am still in Europe. Can I buy a german wall socket here and attach this cord to it?

 

dryercord.jpg

 

 

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have a european 650w(220/240v) hand blender and I tried to look for an american hand blender with the same wattage however I haven't found one that reaches those wattages.

A 220/240v appliance will not run properly on 110/120v.

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p_SCW_184_09.jpg
post-101017-0-37216000-1383596171_thumb.jpg

A friend gave me a german outlet. Where does the neutral wire go?

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Edit:

 

According to this link, I don't need the neutral to complete the circuit.

 

http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-wire-240-volt-outlets.html

Edited by turionx2
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Yes, the US is primarily 120 powered. One difference is frequency, the US uses 60Hz; some other countries use 50Hz. Frequency affects motors primarily. Some motors will run faster on 60 Hz (and use more power) than on 50 Hz.

 

How does frequency work exactly? isnt that relative to devices using clock cycles? like TV's and PC's

 

I understand basic principles of electricity as i did a project for a 12V power management system using arduino but i never incorporated hz into my peukerts equation so im quite worried now :P The equation dictates the rate of discharge for lead-acid specifically to account for sulfation of the cathode/anode so im not sure how relative frequency would be?

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So the frequency is accountable to the wattage? as in something 50hz will be drawing 5a's and something 60hz 6a's? The amp shunt gives an analogue read of all amps leaving, current sensors read each specific device from the switch board. Does the frequency only effect amps being drawn? because if so it doesnt need to be written in to the code.

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