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Leif

Irrational Time: The Absolute Co-Ordinate in The UNIVERSE!

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A photon cannot be emitted randomly. This means that the source cannot emit the photon until the destination has been determined.

 

When you look out at night upon a star 300 light years away, this means that the source determined to release the photon to your eyeball 300 years before you were even born!

 

This is Irrational Time, and in Irrational Time everything that ever was, is, or ever will be exists simultaneously. This is how a photon from a star 300 light years away can determine to find your eyeball in an instant 300 years before you were even born.

 

The unifying co-ordinate in the universe is irrational time. It is the commonality of all existence and provides the unity for all existence.

 

This makes compelling arguments for both Retro-Causation(the future affecting the past) as well as a profound argument for Free-Will!

 

The basis of this result is Einstein's Relativity Theory, and it is over a hundred years old by now...so catch up to it and equal the expansion of thought FINALLY!

 

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Edited by Leif

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A photon cannot be emitted randomly.

Nonsense. Photons are emitted randomly all the time.

 

 

 

This is Irrational Time,

No, this is Irrational post, which happens too, too frequently.

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Endy,

 

I find it interesting that light seems to be the mediating particle of time, the electro-magnetic force, and that light has also throughout human history has been equated with truth. The absence of light is falsehood, and the presence of light is revelation. Interesting that maybe instinctively we have always embraced a relationship with the quality of an idea similarly to the presence or absence of light?

 

This might convey significance to the very nature and essence of thought itself?

 

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Edited by Leif

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We are a primarily diurnal species.

 

Crepuscular or nocturnal intelligent life would likely have a different view.

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Leif

 

Can we move on the physics please? Maths would be good, but if not a brief and unpoetic summary will have to do.

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Nonsense. Photons are emitted randomly all the time.

That would depend on what you mean by randomly.

 

For example, photons are emitted when a higher energy electron moves back to its lower state, which then emits the photon(if my memory does not fail me). Could the excitation be random? yes. Is it random that a photon is emitted? Not really.

 

 

When you look out at night upon a star 300 light years away, this means that the source determined to release the photon to your eyeball 300 years before you were even born!

This is Irrational Time, and in Irrational Time everything that ever was, is, or ever will be exists simultaneously.

No, actually that is the effect of Relativity and the speed of light.

 

 

 

This makes compelling arguments for both Retro-Causation(the future affecting the past) as well as a profound argument for Free-Will!

I don't see how this has anything to do with Free-Will.

Edited by Unity+

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That would depend on what you mean by randomly.

 

For example, photons are emitted when a higher energy electron moves back to its lower state, which then emits the photon(if my memory does not fail me). Could the excitation be random? yes. Is it random that a photon is emitted? Not really.

 

 

Yes really.

Excited states are characterised by a half life.

The photon gets emitted eventually but exactly when is determined by probabilities.

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Yes really.

Excited states are characterised by a half life.

The photon gets emitted eventually but exactly when is determined by probabilities.

That wasn't my point. I clearly stated that, as you stated:

 

 

The photon gets emitted eventually but exactly when is determined by probabilities.

The event causing the photon to be emitted is probabilistic, but a photon being emitted randomly doesn't tell the whole story because that event causes the emission of the photon.

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The photon is emitted as the electron falls to a lower state.

Those "two events" are always simultaneous.

But the emission of a photon is random- you don't know when it will happen.

The decay from an excited state is also random- you don't know when it will happen.

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The photon is emitted as the electron falls to a lower state.

Those "two events" are always simultaneous.

But the emission of a photon is random- you don't know when it will happen.

The decay from an excited state is also random- you don't know when it will happen.

I must have forgotten somethings when I learned about these things then. Forgive me for my lack of information on this one.

 

EDIT: What I was trying to say is that when an electron falls to the lower state, there is no probability that a photon will be emitted or not. A photon will be emitted, but the electron falling to a lower state relies on the probability.

Edited by Unity+

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Since the direction is random the point remains. The OP is wrong.

I was simply "correcting" ACG52(and failed) to make sure all counter arguments remain valid.

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It is interesting that in quantum mechanical experiments that light behaves much differently when observed then when it is not observed.

 

It seems to me that the determination of a photon being released from a star 300 light years in the past with a defined destination being an atom on a rock on the earth; that this is an observation made by the recipient atom on the rock. The photon will therefor behave as a particle.

 

If their seems to be uncertainty as to interception, the photon is a wave and there is a pronounced ambiguity associated with it's nature.

 

:)

Edited by Leif

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It is interesting that in quantum mechanical experiments that light behaves much differently when observed then when it is not observed.

 

It seems to me that the determination of a photon being released from a star 300 light years in the past with a defined destination being an atom on a rock on the earth; that this is an observation made by the recipient atom on the rock. The photon will therefor behave as a particle.

 

If their seems to be uncertainty as to interception, the photon is a wave and there is a pronounced ambiguity associated with it's nature.

 

smile.png

But a photon is both a wave and particle. This is what is known as wave-particle duality.

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A photon cannot be emitted randomly. This means that the source cannot emit the photon until the destination has been determined.

 

We seem to have come to agreement on what the first sentence means, even if we don't like the phrasing.

 

I don't see how the second sentence follows from the first. Is there any reasoning (other than "QM is strange") that allows one to make that inference?

 

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