Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
MMK

Ceramic Coatings.....

Recommended Posts

I have some metal parts of a combustion chamber we fabricated for our Gas Turbine Engine....... Now I want them to be ceramic coated!! How am I gonna do that??? Plz recommend easier ways for the same considering the fact that the equipment around here is not of very high standards!! And also how do I coat the same with ceramic slurry if i get my hands on it!!!! ph34r.png Help me on it!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not an expert, so cannot answer your questions. In addition to ceramic materials, you may want to consider carbon carbon. Here are a few links from wiki, in case you have not found them.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceramic_glaze

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceramic_materials

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon-carbon

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceramic_engineering#The_sintering_process

http://www.ceramicfiber.net/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slip_%28ceramics%29

 

 

 

GE makes two types of ceramic composites. Ceramics strengthened with carbon fibers withstand over 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit and serve as hot gas valves and thrusters inside of rocket systems, or heat shields for hypersonic aircraft and re-entry vehicles in the aerospace industry. The second group, which is reinforced with ceramic fibers and operates at 2,400 degrees, is more durable, and has applications as turbine tip shrouds, combustor liners, blades, and fairings in turbine and jet engines like the LEAP.

From: http://www.gereports.com/rocket-science/

 

Also, search youtube for "jet engine ceramic," for example:

Edited by EdEarl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But It doesnt answer my question regarding how am I gonna use Ceramic Slurry for coating purposes??? Also if I go for Porcelein Enamel is it a good option? If it is how should I proceed???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"I have some metal parts of a combustion chamber we fabricated for our Gas Turbine Engine....... Now I want them to be ceramic coated!!"

Why?

 

Unless you can do plasma spraying or something, any sort of enamel will need to be baked on above it's melting point so that melting point will have to be less than that of the steel (or whatever) that the blade is made from.

That means that the coated blade will be less heat resistant then the uncoated one.

It will also weigh more.

It's likely that it will have a less accurately defined shape.

 

What are you seeking to achieve with a ceramic coating?

 

In any event,. if you do decide to use one, make sure it has the same thermal expansion coefficient as the metal you are coating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"I have some metal parts of a combustion chamber we fabricated for our Gas Turbine Engine....... Now I want them to be ceramic coated!!"

Why?

 

Unless you can do plasma spraying or something, any sort of enamel will need to be baked on above it's melting point so that melting point will have to be less than that of the steel (or whatever) that the blade is made from.

That means that the coated blade will be less heat resistant then the uncoated one.

It will also weigh more.

It's likely that it will have a less accurately defined shape.

 

What are you seeking to achieve with a ceramic coating?

 

In any event,. if you do decide to use one, make sure it has the same thermal expansion coefficient as the metal you are coating.

 

With Ceramic Coatings I want to achieve higher temperature resistance for the metal parts...... not just these but for the nozzle sections too. Well i havent studied materials yet but they are in my course of studies in the next semester that is why I asked for help! Its my mini-project........!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ceramic coatings are used on metals, for instance to improve the resistance against corrosion, so the melting point is not the only criterion. Additionally, alloys are limited far before their melting point, especially by creeping; nickel superalloys for instance can be used to 700°C or 900°C only, and iron alloys even less.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.