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Food allergies caused by parenteral administration of food proteins?

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"In 1913, he (Charles Richet) was awarded the Nobel Prize for his researches on anaphylaxis. He invented this word to designate the sensitivity developed by an organism after it had been given a parenteral injection of a colloid or protein substance or a toxin (1902)."

http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1913/richet-bio.html

It is a well known fact that vaccines contain egg, casein (milk protein), yeast and soy proteins (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/additives.htm).

I have learnt that agar (red seaweed derived) is used in the manufacture of many vaccines and injections. Red algae/seaweed can contaminate any sea food. That can explain allergies to sea foods.

I have learnt that Vitamin K1 injections are given to newborns. Vitamin K1 injections contain fatty acids ( vegetable oils that could be from tree nuts, soy, peanuts ...).

Tick bites have been shown to be the cause of red meat allergy. The same mechanism could be at work. Ticks get meat cells from animals when they feed on them and then inject those cells into the human victim's blood stream.

Just about every food allergy seems to be linked to food proteins parenterally administered by vaccines or injections (or even tick bites). With millions affected by the food allergy epidemic, it seems we are still injecting children with vaccines/injections containing food proteins without thorough research on the matter?

On a related note, pancreatic digest (of unknown mammalian origin?) and human diploid lung fibroblasts are also used in the manufacture of vaccines. The same sensitization mechanism could result in auto immune disorders such as diabetes and asthma?

The Mechanism of sensitization

 

When food proteins are injected in to the blood stream during vaccination, a type I hypersensitivity reaction against an allergen, encountered for the first time, causes a response in a type of immune cell called a TH2 lymphocyte, which belongs to a subset of T cells that produce a cytokine called interleukin-4 (IL-4). These TH2 cells interact with other lymphocytes called B cells, whose role is the production of antibodies. Coupled with signals provided by IL-4, this interaction stimulates the B cell to begin production of a large amount of a particular type of antibody known as IgE that are specific to the food proteins. Secreted IgE circulates in the blood and binds to an IgE-specific receptor (a kind of Fc receptor called FcεRI) on the surface of other kinds of immune cells called mast cells and basophils, which are both involved in the acute inflammatory response. The IgE-coated cells, at this stage are sensitized to the allergen (food proteins). [1] [2]
Mast cells and basophils are found in large numbers in and around the mouth. These locations are prone to injury and thus need more protection against infection. These mast cells and basophils are now IgE-coated and primed to react to the food proteins.
If the vaccinated person now eats these foods, the food proteins bind to the IgE molecules held on the surface of the mast cells or basophils in the mouth. Cross-linking of the IgE and Fc receptors occurs when more than one IgE-receptor complex interacts with the same food allergenic molecule, and activates the sensitized cell. Activated mast cells and basophils undergo a process called degranulation, during which they release histamine and other inflammatory chemical mediators (cytokines, interleukins, leukotrienes, and prostaglandins) from their granules into the surrounding tissue causing several systemic effects, such as vasodilation, mucous secretion, nerve stimulation and smooth muscle contraction. This results in rhinorrhea, itchiness, dyspnea, and anaphylaxis. Depending on the individual, the allergen, and the mode of introduction, the symptoms can be system-wide (classical anaphylaxis), or localized to particular body systems; asthma is localized to the respiratory system and eczema is localized to the dermis.[2]


In other words, an allergic reaction occurs to the foods that contain the food proteins which were present in the vaccine or injection.

 

Thanks.


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I look forward to a couple of things.

Evidence for this assertion "Tick bites have been shown to be the cause of red meat allergy."

and an explanation of the fairly common allergy to tomatoes.

 

Some reason to think that the whole story is anything apart from a post hoc fallacy would also be good.

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It is easy to find information on the web for tick association to red meat allergy.

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/news/articles/2012/11/09/lone-star-tick-bite-might-trigger-red-meat-allergy-study

 

So far I have not come across tomato proteins being used in injections/vaccines. So many growth media are used in the development of vaccines. May be some do include tomato extract?

 

Per this:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/food-allergies/AA00057

The following are the most common food allergies in the US.

  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Peanuts
  • Tree nuts (such as almonds, cashews, walnuts)
  • Fish (such as bass, cod, flounder)
  • Shellfish (such as crab, lobster, shrimp)
  • Soy
  • Wheat

 

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2011/09/08/peds.2010-2771.full.pdf

 

While the conclusion the authors have drawn is one possibility, there may be another...

Perhaps the child did not have egg allergy before parenteral nutrition. The 14-day delay before symptoms may have been the actual time it took to develop sensitization to the parenteral nutrition proteins. We know that vaccines need a couple of weeks to offer protection. Perhaps the egg based parenteral nutrition resulted in the child developing egg allergy.

 

Thanks.

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I would not recommend putting too much stock into what you read on the web. If an individual's body is not going to tolerate and/or process something correctly it simply isn't going to. I have had many tick bites and still eat red meat without a problem.

A more likely culprit to these food sensitivities and allergies is the point to which most of what people consume is processed and refined. It's to the point that human bodies don't recognize it and therefore don't process it. It also doesn't help that most things consumed have such a minute amount of nutrients left after processing that the body ends up starved of them even after trying so hard to absorb them from food.

I generally don't eat anything but whole foods. If I do I suffer the consequences which range from burps that taste like rotten eggs to severe stomach cramps. My mom and my child both have severe Celiacs Disease and it was present in my child before any of the above vaccinations were given.

Another thing that doesn't help is the amount of chemicals and metals that people are constantly exposed to. Did you know that most fabric softener contains formeldahyde? Things like this prevent the body from functioning properly which can lead to symptoms of food allergies. Introducing shell fish and other things that are in vaccines is actually more likely to help the body be able to process it though. It's no different than if you keep your child inside all the time they are probably going to have a not so pleasant response to pollen. However, if they're outside regularly at a young age they are able to build up a tolerance. I worked in healthcare for 6 years and was exposed to many illnesses which allowed my body to produce antibodies and now I very rarely get sick.

The bottom line is that everything about this is quite easily debunked.

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I agree that our contaminated environment and processed food do not help. However, to debunk the food allergy/food protein injection link, please provide supporting evidence.

 

I have more evidence linking food protein injection and food allergy here: https://sites.google.com/site/vaccineinducedfoodallergy/,

reproduced below:

 

What causes food allergies?
There is growing evidence that food proteins introduced into the blood stream result in the development of food allergies.

Charles Richet discovered more than a hundred years ago that food proteins present in vaccines or injections will cause food allergies.
He was awarded the Nobel Prize for this work.
How are food proteins introduced into the blood stream?
Vaccines, injections, tick bites and poor digestion due to acid reducing medications such as proton pump inhibitors (PPI).

Food (plant and animal) proteins such as egg, milk (casein), yeast, gelatin, red seaweed (agar)
are present in various vaccines (CDC's vaccine ingredients list).
Vitamin K1 injections contain vegetable oil (legume and nut oils) and/or
animal fats. So allergies to peanuts and tree nuts could be traced to
such injections.
Tick bites result in the injection of a protein called alpha-gal (which is present in red meat) into the blood stream.[3]
When acidity in the stomach is reduced by acid reducing medications, food proteins are not broken down. They travel to the intestine intact and
get absorbed into the blood stream.[4]
In all cases, the food proteins thus introduced into the blood stream can result in developing allergies to those food items.
C-section - A contributing factor?

"In the gastrointestinal tract of babies born by c-section, there is a
pattern of "at risk" microorganisms that may cause them to be more
vulnerable to developing the antibody Immunoglobulin E, or IgE, when in
contact with allergens" - Christine Cole Johnson, Ph.D., MPH, chair of Henry Ford Department of Health Sciences.[5]


Mechanism of food allergy development

When food proteins are injected in to the
blood stream, a type I hypersensitivity reaction
against an allergen, encountered for the first time, causes a response
in a type of immune cell called a TH2 lymphocyte, which belongs to a subset of T cells that produce a cytokine called interleukin-4 (IL-4). These TH2 cells interact with other lymphocytes called B cells,
whose role is the production of antibodies. Coupled with signals
provided by IL-4, this interaction stimulates the B cell to begin
production of a large amount of a particular type of antibody known as
IgE that are specific to the food proteins. Secreted IgE circulates in the blood and binds to an IgE-specific
receptor (a kind of Fc receptor called FcεRI) on the surface of other kinds of immune cells called mast cells and basophils,
which are both involved in the acute inflammatory response. The
IgE-coated cells, at this stage are sensitized to the allergen (food proteins). [1] [2]

Mast cells and basophils are
found in large numbers in and around the mouth. These locations are
prone to injury and thus need more protection against infection. These
mast cells and basophils are now IgE-coated and primed to react to the
food proteins.
If the vaccinated person now eats these foods, the food proteins bind
to the IgE molecules held on the surface of the mast cells or basophils in the mouth.
Cross-linking of the IgE and Fc receptors occurs when more than one
IgE-receptor complex interacts with the same food allergenic molecule, and
activates the sensitized cell. Activated mast cells and basophils
undergo a process called degranulation, during which they release histamine and other inflammatory chemical mediators (cytokines, interleukins, leukotrienes, and prostaglandins) from their granules into the surrounding tissue causing several systemic effects, such as vasodilation, mucous secretion, nerve stimulation and smooth muscle contraction. This results in rhinorrhea, itchiness, dyspnea, and anaphylaxis.
Depending on the individual, the allergen, and the mode of
introduction, the symptoms can be system-wide (classical anaphylaxis),
or localized to particular body systems; asthma is localized to the
respiratory system and eczema is localized to the dermis.[2]

In other words, an allergic reaction occurs to the foods that contain the
food proteins which were present in the vaccine. Red seaweed is a food
source for shellfish. Vaccines can induce an allergy to red seaweed
proteins. Consuming shellfish (or any seafood that is contaminated with
red seaweed proteins) will result in an allergic reaction that may be
blamed on shellfish but may actually be caused by the red seaweed
present in the shellfish.

Expert opinion

"
.... i have often heard people dismiss the widespread experimental
model of allergy, in which BALB/c mice are injected IP with ovalbumin in
alum (the most common adjuvant in vaccines for humans) and then later
challenged orally or nasally with OVA. the dismissal is usually based
on a statement that
goes something like "but this isn't the way that humans are sensitized
to allergens".

well......perhaps, at least in some cases, it IS
how humans are sensitized to allergens? perhaps not by intraperitoneal
injections, but nevertheless by injections? sometimes by needles
(containing alum); sometimes by insects; perhaps sometimes by injuries
(thorns? nails? cuts?)...." - Dr. Matzinger at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.



You can see Dr.Matzinger's full response here.

Same mechanism, different disease ?

Pancreatic digest (of unknown mammalian origin?) and human diploid lung fibroblasts are also
used in the manufacture of vaccines. The same sensitization mechanism
could result in auto immune disorders such as diabetes and asthma? In
other words, your body becomes allergic to some of its own tissues and
begins attacking them.


Perfect Storm ?
Increasing C-section deliveries.
Standard practice of administering Vitamin K1 injections to newborns to prevent Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding (VKDB).
Vaccine schedule with increasing number of vaccines.
Over prescription of acid reducing medications.
Result, an epidemic of food allergies in children and adults.

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It is easy to find information on the web for tick association to red meat allergy.

Yes, but that's neither what you said, nor what I asked for. You said "the cause" not a possible cause.

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"In 1913, he (Charles Richet) was awarded the Nobel Prize for his researches on anaphylaxis. He invented this word to designate the sensitivity developed by an organism after it had been given a parenteral injection of a colloid or protein substance or a toxin (1902)."

 

http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1913/richet-bio.html

 

It is a well known fact that vaccines contain egg, casein (milk protein), yeast and soy proteins (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/additives.htm).

 

I have learnt that agar (red seaweed derived) is used in the manufacture of many vaccines and injections. Red algae/seaweed can contaminate any sea food. That can explain allergies to sea foods.

 

I have learnt that Vitamin K1 injections are given to newborns. Vitamin K1 injections contain fatty acids ( vegetable oils that could be from tree nuts, soy, peanuts ...).

 

Tick bites have been shown to be the cause of red meat allergy. The same mechanism could be at work. Ticks get meat cells from animals when they feed on them and then inject those cells into the human victim's blood stream.

 

Just about every food allergy seems to be linked to food proteins parenterally administered by vaccines or injections (or even tick bites). With millions affected by the food allergy epidemic, it seems we are still injecting children with vaccines/injections containing food proteins without thorough research on the matter?

 

On a related note, pancreatic digest (of unknown mammalian origin?) and human diploid lung fibroblasts are also used in the manufacture of vaccines. The same sensitization mechanism could result in auto immune disorders such as diabetes and asthma?

 

The Mechanism of sensitization

 

When food proteins are injected in to the blood stream during vaccination, a type I hypersensitivity reaction against an allergen, encountered for the first time, causes a response in a type of immune cell called a TH2 lymphocyte, which belongs to a subset of T cells that produce a cytokine called interleukin-4 (IL-4). These TH2 cells interact with other lymphocytes called B cells, whose role is the production of antibodies. Coupled with signals provided by IL-4, this interaction stimulates the B cell to begin production of a large amount of a particular type of antibody known as IgE that are specific to the food proteins. Secreted IgE circulates in the blood and binds to an IgE-specific receptor (a kind of Fc receptor called FcεRI) on the surface of other kinds of immune cells called mast cells and basophils, which are both involved in the acute inflammatory response. The IgE-coated cells, at this stage are sensitized to the allergen (food proteins).[1] [2]
Mast cells and basophils are found in large numbers in and around the mouth. These locations are prone to injury and thus need more protection against infection. These mast cells and basophils are now IgE-coated and primed to react to the food proteins.
If the vaccinated person now eats these foods, the food proteins bind to the IgE molecules held on the surface of the mast cells or basophils in the mouth. Cross-linking of the IgE and Fc receptors occurs when more than one IgE-receptor complex interacts with the same food allergenic molecule, and activates the sensitized cell. Activated mast cells and basophils undergo a process called degranulation, during which they release histamine and other inflammatory chemical mediators (cytokines, interleukins, leukotrienes, and prostaglandins) from their granules into the surrounding tissue causing several systemic effects, such as vasodilation, mucous secretion, nerve stimulation and smooth muscle contraction. This results in rhinorrhea, itchiness, dyspnea, and anaphylaxis. Depending on the individual, the allergen, and the mode of introduction, the symptoms can be system-wide (classical anaphylaxis), or localized to particular body systems; asthma is localized to the respiratory system and eczema is localized to the dermis.[2]

 

In other words, an allergic reaction occurs to the foods that contain the food proteins which were present in the vaccine or injection.

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

I find it disingenuous that you edited a cop/paste of a wikipedia article to make it appear as if food proteins automatically sensitize the immune system. The article highlights the process what happens IF sensitization, by whatever source occurs. The important point that is neglected by OP is that not everyone has allergies and the actual causes are far from known. What is clear is that simple exposure is insufficient (otherwise we would basically react to everything), but rather genetic links appear to be relevant as well environmental factor (as explored by the hygiene hypothesis, for example).

 

Can vaccines trigger allergies? Certainly. Can they sensitize a person with a disposition? Yes just like any exposure can. Do they cause it? Certainly not directly via a simple molecular link as OP implies. One potential way is that certain vaccines may increase responsiveness to histamines, but these results are not well reproduced (and thus hint at a genetic basis for whatever may have happened). Another is again the hygiene hypothesis, i..e. vaccinated children have a lower infection burden and that may lead to higher rates of sensitization. Again, the studies are not terribly conclusive (and thus indicating that more complex factors are involved).

Some studies did manage to correlate vaccinations with allergies, but many do not, the usual issue with epidemiological data.

One issue is of course that allergies are still a relative rare event in the cohorts, i.e. most children are vaccinated, but only a very small sub-set actually develops allergies, whereas control groups of non-vaccinated children tend to be outliers of sorts (e.g. in isolated rural areas). One study found a weak correlation, but only in a sub-group children that rarely visit physicians. Those with more regular care showed no differences (McKeever et al. Am J Public Health. 2004).

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CharonY,

 

The first paragraph, reproduced below describes sensitization to an allergen/protein. This in Charles Richet's experiment is the dog getting the sea anemone toxin injection the first time. There is no reaction.

 

"When food proteins are injected in to the blood stream during
vaccination, a type I hypersensitivity reaction against an allergen,
encountered for the first time, causes a response in a type of immune
cell called a
TH2 lymphocyte, which belongs to a subset of T cells that produce a cytokine called interleukin-4 (IL-4). These TH2 cells interact with other lymphocytes called B cells, whose role is the production of antibodies. Coupled with signals
provided by IL-4, this interaction stimulates the B cell to begin
production of a large amount of a particular type of antibody known as
IgE that are specific to the food proteins. Secreted IgE circulates in
the blood and binds to an IgE-specific receptor (a kind of
Fc receptor called FcεRI) on the surface of other kinds of immune cells called mast cells and basophils,
which are both involved in the acute inflammatory response. The
IgE-coated cells, at this stage are sensitized to the allergen (food proteins).
[1] [2]"

 

The second paragraph describes what happens on subsequent exposure to the same allergen/protein.

 

"If the vaccinated person now eats these foods, the food proteins bind to
the IgE molecules held on the surface of the mast cells or basophils in
the mouth. Cross-linking of the IgE and Fc receptors occurs when more
than one IgE-receptor complex interacts with the same food allergenic
molecule, and activates the sensitized cell. Activated mast cells and
basophils undergo a process called
degranulation, during which they release histamine and other inflammatory chemical mediators (cytokines, interleukins, leukotrienes, and prostaglandins) from their granules into the surrounding tissue causing several systemic effects, such as vasodilation, mucous secretion, nerve stimulation and smooth muscle contraction. This results in rhinorrhea, itchiness, dyspnea, and anaphylaxis.
Depending on the individual, the allergen, and the mode of
introduction, the symptoms can be system-wide (classical anaphylaxis),
or localized to particular body systems; asthma is localized to the
respiratory system and eczema is localized to the
dermis.[2] "

 

Charles Richet discovered this in 1902 and there have been multiple discoveries of the same mechanism at work since.

1. The discovery that tick bites cause sensitization to alpha-gal (by injecting alpha-gal directly into the blood stream). The result is red meat allergy.

2. Untersmayr et al, show that proton pump inhibitors impact protein degradation which results in proteins entering the blood stream. (http://www.immuneweb.com/wenzhai/pdf/010301.pdf) The result is food allergies.

3. As Dr. Matzinger of NIAID points out here, injecting mice with ovalbumin and subsequently challenging them with nasal/oral ovalbumin is a common model used to demonstrate allergy.

 

As to why only a very small sub-set of children actually develop allergies:

Viral proteins in vaccines are not 100% effective even with adjuvants and complex vaccine engineering. Egg proteins in vaccines for example, are an impurity. No effort is made to make them produce food allergies with 100% efficacy. So (fortunately) only a sub-set develop the allergy. But unfortunately for those who do develop it, it can be life threatening.

 

While genetics and the hygiene hypotheses may have some related role, Charles Richet demonstrated that neither of those are necessary for this mechanism.

 

Thanks.

 

 

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It is easy to find information on the web for tick association to red meat allergy.

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/news/articles/2012/11/09/lone-star-tick-bite-might-trigger-red-meat-allergy-study

 

So far I have not come across tomato proteins being used in injections/vaccines. So many growth media are used in the development of vaccines. May be some do include tomato extract?

 

Per this:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/food-allergies/AA00057

The following are the most common food allergies in the US.

  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Peanuts
  • Tree nuts (such as almonds, cashews, walnuts)
  • Fish (such as bass, cod, flounder)
  • Shellfish (such as crab, lobster, shrimp)
  • Soy
  • Wheat

 

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2011/09/08/peds.2010-2771.full.pdf

 

While the conclusion the authors have drawn is one possibility, there may be another...

Perhaps the child did not have egg allergy before parenteral nutrition. The 14-day delay before symptoms may have been the actual time it took to develop sensitization to the parenteral nutrition proteins. We know that vaccines need a couple of weeks to offer protection. Perhaps the egg based parenteral nutrition resulted in the child developing egg allergy.

 

Thanks.

 

When we look at the benefits vs. any possible drawbacks that could arise from a child or adult getting a vaccine...the benefits greatly outweigh any drawbacks.

 

I find the whole..."I am not having my kid immunized."....crowd ridiculous in their thinking. What is even more ridiculous is how this group basically REWRITES history as many a time have I heard or read these people state that Vaccines have never done any good or have never been a benefit in fighting disease. LOL!

 

Sure...there are going to be some who have a reaction but what if people had never had their kids immunized for SMALL POX?

 

There was a disease that killed MILLIONS and now because in the past people were immunized...Small Pox has vanished from the face of the Earth...except in Labs.

 

Split Infinity

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Split Infinity,

 

1. Vaccines are very important. No disagreement there. I am talking about vaccine safety.

2. I am not talking about someone having a reaction to a vaccine. I am talking about people DEVELOPING food allergies because of vaccines/injections due to food proteins being present in the vaccines/injections.

3. Life threatening food allergies should never be the price one has to pay to get immunized.

4. With strong evidence showing parenteral administration of food proteins causes food allergies, why are millions of kids being vaccinated with unsafe vaccines/injections that is causing the food allergy epidemic?

 

Thanks.

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With strong evidence showing parenteral administration of food proteins causes food allergies, why are millions of kids being vaccinated with unsafe vaccines/injections that is causing the food allergy epidemic?

First, your evidence is hardly strong. It's more akin to old wive's tales and innuendo. Second, even if we stipulate for the purpose of argument that maybe some vaccines lead to some food allergies, the reason why we keep using them is clear. The benefits FAR outweigh the costs.

 

 

c6fb5feb7f1ee71b7e725277d3099916.jpg

 

 

And another good one here:

 

1-1_infographic_02.gif

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iNow,

 

It is not MY evidence. Charles Richet was not awarded the Nobel Prize for "old wive's tales and innuendo".

Dr. Thomas Platts-Mills who discovered tick bites cause red meat allergy himself suffers from red meat allergy due to a tick bite.

None of your vaccine statistics would change if vaccines were made safer.

15 million Americans have developed food allergies. Every 3 minutes, food allergy sends someone to the ER. (http://www.foodallergy.org/facts-and-stats)

What is the cost of hurting 15 milliion Americans? What is the cost of making these vaccines safe?

 

Why are we hurting our kids with unsafe vaccines and injections? Because nobody wants to spend the money to make vaccines safe?

 

Thanks.

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Richet discovered anaphylaxis but his work never explained (and to date we do not know) why it occurs in certain individuals. Again, if the mechanism would work as you described, everyone would be allergic to all foods as the micro lesions in our gums would expose us to food proteins almost all the time. The real question is what leads to sensitization (and again, the exposure is only the trigger that has to work in conjunction with something else). If that is not shown, highlighting Richet's work is nothing more than an appeal to authority.

 

 

Vaccine safety is important of course, but generally it is better to figure out where real problems and concentrate on strong links rather than speculations. Especially since no strong study exist to show that such a mechanistic link exists in the first place. One thing some are investigating is whether adjuvants can mediate immune responses in a negative way, but again, the links are so weak that it is unclear if any changes would really have any benefits whatsoever. The only strong data point we have are those that iNow highlighted. I.e. that vaccines do protect against diseases. For the others more studies are needed, though existing ones generally fail to find a link.

Edited by CharonY

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Split Infinity,

 

1. Vaccines are very important. No disagreement there. I am talking about vaccine safety.

2. I am not talking about someone having a reaction to a vaccine. I am talking about people DEVELOPING food allergies because of vaccines/injections due to food proteins being present in the vaccines/injections.

3. Life threatening food allergies should never be the price one has to pay to get immunized.

4. With strong evidence showing parenteral administration of food proteins causes food allergies, why are millions of kids being vaccinated with unsafe vaccines/injections that is causing the food allergy epidemic?

 

Thanks.

 

In that case I whole Heartedly agree with you.

 

Sorry if I jumped on you. I guess I have read one topic too many where people are advocating that parents should not have their children immunized.

 

I had read one mother telling the membership that she pulled her kids out of school rather than be forced to have them immunized as the school would not allow non-vaccinated children to attend school.

 

Because I travel and have traveled...EXTENSIVELY...and not just to Europe as a short time ago...I was doing a...JOB...upon several islands off the coast of Sumatra. Every time I have to go to places like this...ESPECIALLY ANYWHERE in Africa...I have to get booster shots and some for diseases I have never even heard of. I have to get these shots a few months in advance if possible and sometimes it is not possible so there are risks involved.

 

I have seen...FIRSTHAND...what certain viral Hemorrhagic Fevers can do to a whole village in a week and TB is ALL OVER THE 3RD WORLD...and if a child in the U.S. is not immunized they can easily contract it from certain children specific to immigrant groups attending public schools.

 

Such young parents have been born in an age of Medical Miracles and have NO HISTORY OR MEMORIES of any time as those in the past in the U.S. where massive sanitoriums were built to house the infected and contagious as MILLIONS of the so called...WALKING DEAD...as there was neither a vaccine or a cure for TB, Small Pox...and a very large number of diseases that such a modern day parent has never even heard of knows about.

 

Although I agree that great caution should be taken in developing such vaccines...it is utter stupidity and as well is shear ignorance for any parent to not get their children vaccinated.

 

Split Infinity

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CharonY,

 

"Richet discovered anaphylaxis but his work never explained (and to date we do not know) why it occurs in certain individuals."

While sensitivity may vary among individuals, I believe the mechanism applies to all individuals. I have not heard that Richet had to inject multiple animals to get a reaction.

Likewise, in the common lab allergy model, I have not heard that you have to pick and choose among mice for the model to work. I expect any mouse will develop a reaction to intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin.

 

" if the mechanism would work as you described, everyone would be allergic to all foods as the micro lesions in our gums would expose us to food proteins almost all the time."

In theory, yes. However, the micro lesion exposure mechanism has been at work in nature for hundreds of millions of years. The result is that organisms sensitive enough to develop food allergies to micro lesion exposure would have been naturally eliminated during evolution. Therefore, one can expect that food allergy in humans due to micro lesion exposure would be rare. Vaccines/injections are a different matter. My kids received 5 vaccine shots in one sitting. That is a load of food proteins with multiple powerful adjuvants entering the blood stream, all at one time. Nothing in nature prepares the human body for such an event. To make matters worse, it has been demonstrated that kid's delivered via C-section are primed to develop IgE per [5].

 

Richet, Dr. Platts-Mills [3], Untersmayr [4], I think is enough strong evidence to justify a study of vaccine/injection link to food allergies. Until such a study is done, claiming parenteral administration of food proteins along with adjuvants is safe is also mere speculation.

 

Thanks.

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