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BS Psychology Applying To Molecular Neuroscience


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Hello world. [The obiliatory] Sorry if this is in the wrong section, this is my first post on here. Forgive my wall of text/mini rant.

 

I have some anxieties about graduate school and was hoping for a bit of guidance; I am nearing the end of the second semester of my junior year so I will be applying to grad schools before long and wanted to hear your thoughts on some things. I am working toward my B.S. in psychology with a biology minor and I have realized that the area I really want to go into is neuroscience, in particular I think I am leaning toward the molecular/cellular side of neuroscience/neurobiology. I chose a psych major because the brain has always been of interest to me but I've come to realize that psychology is not where my heart is, it's down in the proteins and the DNA. My major interest is really in neurodengerative disease, everything about the entire spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders is simultaneously utterly fascinating and the most tragic thing I am capable of imagining, both reasons why I want to pursue the topic. I have questions about these disorders for which answers do not yet exist and I think if I'm going to find my answers anywhere then it's on a molecular scale.

 

In looking at graduate schools, almost all seem to say something along the lines that competitive undergrads have taken courses in calculus/organic chem/physics/advanced bio. The thing that makes me anxious is that by the time I graduate I will not have taken organic chem, physics, or calc. I've got bio under my belt, and by the time I graduate I'll have done general chem. However, I haven't taken calc or physics because I am terrified to death by math, and by extension physics (high school physics was one of the worst expereinces of my academic life, though it likely was just because of my teacher I've been put off from physics ever since). Additionally, there was a hiccup in me getting general chem done (the first time I tried to take it, the classes filled up before I could register and the second time I learned that my math prereq for psych did not qualify me for chem, so I had to waste a semester taking a 100 level math class). Frankly, that single greatest regret I have about my undergrad career is that I'm not going to get to take organic (or biochem).

 

That said, I'll will have taken two semesters of general chem, genetics, two semesters of anatomy/physiology, molecular bio, a molecular bio lab, cell bio, the lower level bio (two semesters of intro bio, biodiversity), sensation & perception, psychopharmacology, physiological psych, behavioral stats, and any other science that I can cram in in the next two semesters. I have a 3.6 GPA, I haven't taken the GRE yet but I'm studying for them, I have begun working in my schools lab for comparative neuropsychology so I'll have about a year under my belt when I graduate. I'll have three reccomendation leters from faculty who actually know me- one from the lab, two from biopsych professors who I have TA'ed for (one is chair of the department, the other recieved her Ph.D. in molecular neuro if that adds anything). Finally, I have been trying to learn organic on my own, I can't say that I took the class but at least I can say that I put in the effort to acquire the knowledge, right?

 

What I'm trying to get at is, does my lack of organic and physics totally kill my shot? I know it puts me at a disadvantage and I don't claim I'm ivy league, but I do know a thing or two about a neuron or two. If I were interested in something like cognitive neuro then I would not be as worried because alot of schools say that that requirements for acceptance are flexible, but in going for molecular- I just don't know. I just need someone to put a pipette in my hand and give me the opportunity to show that I am capable of doing something astounding. Can I just get some thoughts, please?

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Take this all with a grain of salt, as at the end of the day it's just a single example, and I'm not exactly an expert in neuroscience education:

 

There's a guy at my school in a similar situation. He's got a bachelor's in psychology and wants to go to graduate school for neuroscience. He wasn't accepted into grad school, and he says his lack of natural science in undergrad was the main problem. Now (or at least, as of the last time I saw him) he's doing a second bachelor's, in chemistry.

 

I don't know what classes he took during his psych program or where he applied for grad school, so perhaps your preparation is better than what his was, the grad programs you're looking at are more forgiving and/or willing to let you take required science courses with them. However, if you can't get more natural science in before you graduate, you may have to at least take a few post-bacc courses before graduate programs will accept you.

Edited by John
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You should take calculus. If you have stats knowledge in psychology, you should be able to apply that to biology without much of a problem. You do not need to take organic chemistry. I believe biochemistry is much more relevant for molecular biologists. However, students often cannot take a biochemistry series without doing an organic chemistry course or series first. Nonetheless, the organic chemistry courses would not be drastically important. Generally, you'll be reading about chemicals and understanding how they work prior to working with them as a molecular biologists, thus enabling the usage of a protocol or developing a protocol.

 

You'll be fine. I would suggest taking calculus, however, and getting at least a B in it. You don't NEED it, but it's helpful for understanding obscure calculus things when you come across them.

 

Another possibility is doing neuroscience research and showing your interest and ability to understand the molecular biology of neuroscience in front of the individual who is allowing you to do research for him or her.

 

Hmm.... I think because you've taken genetics and cellular biology, then you'll have a fair grasp of much theory behind lab work if not increased ability to understand it. Mastering lab work is something else, however.

 

Personally, I have knowledge in parts of neuroscience that involve electronics, mathematics, and physics, such as neural engineering. Because mathematics and physics are involved, a knowledge of mathematics and physics helps me read journal articles involved physics and mathematics. There is also neuromathematics as a field of neuroscience research.

 

My simple advice is don't limit yourself. GPA is one thing, so keep it as a concern, but in the future, don't limit yourself.

Edited by Genecks
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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks guys, I have been meaning to reply but have just been so busy with school.

 

I've already registered for the fall semester but if I play this right I should be able to squeeze in a semester of general physics and pre calc (a pre req. for calc). Not optimal, no, but I suppose it's better than nothing.

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The field you would like to go into is not one for those who are not ready for a challenge and you will spend...YEARS...even if you graduate participating from the bottom up to be able to work and make...A LOT OF MONEY...in a field that is expanding it's knowledge base daily.

 

Now here is the thing...unless you become a Dr. of Medicine...or get a PHD. in either the Biological or Physics end of this...going into such a field without obtaining such Doctorates is like wanting to be a licensed Pilot and just getting a drivers license.

 

Psychology is very subjective and the other fields you speak of are NOT. You will have to take a variety of Psychology classes just to be able to continue study in this chosen field you state but Psychology is very different that learning the Brains Neurotransmitter matrix and chemical precursors.

 

So although necessary...getting good grades in Psychology or a degree is worth about 50 cents and a cup of coffee as far as what you aspire to.

 

I have multiple degrees and I admit I used to LMAO at the way certain Professors would act as far as how serious they took Psychology as well as how they mistakenly think the thoughts and actions of one person will follow a pattern as far as all people. This maybe true of a certain percentage of the population but not all.

 

Split Infinity

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Thanks guys, I have been meaning to reply but have just been so busy with school.

 

I've already registered for the fall semester but if I play this right I should be able to squeeze in a semester of general physics and pre calc (a pre req. for calc). Not optimal, no, but I suppose it's better than nothing.

 

Oh, you don't have pre-calc out of the way? Yes, then definitely increase your maths, I would argue.

 

I would not suggest taking general (algebra-based) physics if you do not have pre-calculus out of the way. It is not impossible to understand physics without a strong algebra background. However, I reason you will be spending a fair amount of time understand the equations, the different situations they are used in, and learning how to use them in an abstract way for physical scenarios that deviate from the ones you may commonly encounter while studying physics. If you can understand the equations and quickly understand how to apply them to new and abstract situations, then good. Make sure you understand what the physics instructor is discussing and you work through various problems and understand whatever abstractions to concepts the instructor may present. If you're taking physics, algebra-based, you'll be competing against pre-medical students, so you may have some increased difficulty getting a good grade.

 

For the higher mathematical fields I have studied, learned equations are eventually used in abstract situations. As such, an ability to use equations in abstract scenarios (scenarios deviated from previously encountered situations, whereby the formulas can be used) help a person think more abstractly. Abstract thinking becomes more important. I think that is something I did not across too often while studying psychology. I don't recall too often using abstract reasoning unless I was developing a psychological experiment. I think more often in psychology I would see a set of criteria and attempt to diagnose what disorder/condition fits that criteria. That is a kind of abstract reasoning that is similar to math and physics problems, but using math can be different due to the increased level of need to manipulate mathematical variables and visualize the physical situation so that math can be manipulated and equations used.

Edited by Genecks
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Oh, you don't have pre-calc out of the way? Yes, then definitely increase your maths, I would argue.

 

I would not suggest taking general (algebra-based) physics if you do not have pre-calculus out of the way. It is not impossible to understand physics without a strong algebra background. However, I reason you will be spending a fair amount of time understand the equations, the different situations they are used in, and learning how to use them in an abstract way for physical scenarios that deviate from the ones you may commonly encounter while studying physics. If you can understand the equations and quickly understand how to apply them to new and abstract situations, then good. Make sure you understand what the physics instructor is discussing and you work through various problems and understand whatever abstractions to concepts the instructor may present. If you're taking physics, algebra-based, you'll be competing against pre-medical students, so you may have some increased difficulty getting a good grade.

 

For the higher mathematical fields I have studied, learned equations are eventually used in abstract situations. As such, an ability to use equations in abstract scenarios (scenarios deviated from previously encountered situations, whereby the formulas can be used) help a person think more abstractly. Abstract thinking becomes more important. I think that is something I did not across too often while studying psychology. I don't recall too often using abstract reasoning unless I was developing a psychological experiment. I think more often in psychology I would see a set of criteria and attempt to diagnose what disorder/condition fits that criteria. That is a kind of abstract reasoning that is similar to math and physics problems, but using math can be different due to the increased level of need to manipulate mathematical variables and visualize the physical situation so that math can be manipulated and equations used.

Yeah, okay I will definitly be increasing my math. The reason I haven't taken higher math before is, like I said, it really does scare me. I've just never in my life been able to wrap my head around it, it just seems so abstract to the point that I don't understand why this exists- maybe for that reason physics will be better if there's an obvious application. I wonder if it's too late to register for summer classes...

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Yeah, okay I will definitly be increasing my math. The reason I haven't taken higher math before is, like I said, it really does scare me. I've just never in my life been able to wrap my head around it, it just seems so abstract to the point that I don't understand why this exists- maybe for that reason physics will be better if there's an obvious application. I wonder if it's too late to register for summer classes...

 

I read the good intentioned quoted reply you quoted here and I have to tell you that Physics and in particular Quantum Physics are key in this field.

 

The Human Brain is a Quantum Computer and as such can calculate at great speed...and complexity. Thus it is running 3 distinct consciousnesses...Left...analytical, Right Brain Hemisphere, Creative and the SUBCONSCIOUS...as well as other areas of the brain responsible for everything from Hormone release to auto flight fight responses.

 

Here is the thing...unlike a Lap Top that uses a series of 1's and 0's in a Binary Code....a Quantum Computer or the Human Brain uses INDETERMINATE VALUES. In a Electronic Quantum Computer this is achieved by using Quibits...from WIKI...In quantum computing, a qubit (pron.: /ˈkjuːbɪt/) or quantum bit is a unit of quantum information—the quantum analogue of the classical bit.

A qubit is a two-state quantum-mechanical system such as the polarization of a single photon: here the two states are vertical polarization and horizontal polarization. In a classical system, a bit would have to be in one state or the other, but quantum mechanics allows the qubit to be in a superposition of both states at the same time, a property which is fundamental to quantum computing.

Thus although the Human Brain is Biological...it too allows Superposition of States and Indeterminate Values. An analogy although not close to the reality but close as far as it's use to explain the value of what is quoted above...The USAF R&D groups long ago found out that by wing airfoil construction allowing Greater Instablity...ALSO ALLOWED SUCH AIRCRAFT TO OBTAIN GREATER FLIGHT CHARACTERISTICS AND MANUVERABILITY.

In a Quantum System...this is slightly applied to Superposition and Indeterminate Value.

I would make certain I took as many Hard Core Quantum Physics courses as I could.

Split Infinity

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I decided last night I was going to take pre-calc over the summer and I'm in the process of rearranging my schedule for the Fall to include general physics I so I should be able to do two semesters of physics. I'll probably be able to do one semester of calc in the Spring, there's absolutely no way I can squeeze it into the Fall and at any rate I'm going to really need to dedicate a semester to it if I want to do well.

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That sounds like a good plan. Balancing one's academic courseload is important.

You may also be interested in biophysics.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biophysics

 

The human brain is binary in some ways, whereby there is an all-or-none action potential. Either a neuron is firing or it is not: This is more like a binary system. Also, there are graded potentials, which are of importance: These are unlike the binary, all-or-none feature of other neurons. I would not focus so much on quantum physics during your undergraduate education for biology.

 

Might I suggest you get a tutor if you feel that your math skills are not up-to-par. I often did such in my undergraduate education for calculus. Prior to that, I hadn't taken a hard math class for over three years.

Edited by Genecks
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@Genecks

 

Thanks, your input has been super helpful, I definitly feel alot better now.

I'm somewhat familiar with the field of biophysics, unfortunately my school doesn't offer any courses (to my knowledge) really dedicated to it. Though, like the wiki says, most schools don't and it's a cross disciplinary kind of thing. I will be sure to hold on to this info and see what I can find out.

And a tutor for calc would probably be a really great idea. I should have thought of that myself since I know there is a tutoring thing in the math department, I'm going to have to look into that.

Thanks again, I totally appreciate it.

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There are a variety of cross-disciplinary things that go on in graduate school, which is often encountered by working in different labs. If you're interested in organic chemistry, I would suggest studying it after you get your bachelor's degree unless you desire to be a pre-med student. Becoming a pre-med, as I believe, would increase difficulties beyond getting a B.S. Psychology unless the workload in the B.S. psychology is so lax that you have an extra 40+ hours a week to devote to organic chemistry, studying nucleophiles and electrophiles, along with memorizing, generalizing, and abstracting reaction mechanisms. Looking back, I could have made an A in my first semester of organic chemistry. However, I'm not too sure with my advanced skills in studying that I could have made more than a B in my second semester organic chemistry. The workload was ridiculous. Then again, one of my problems is that I had all of my gen eds out of the way and was taking degree-major related courses, thus turning up the level of general difficulty with the things I dealt with.

Edited by Genecks
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That sounds like a good plan. Balancing one's academic courseload is important.

You may also be interested in biophysics.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biophysics

 

The human brain is binary in some ways, whereby there is an all-or-none action potential. Either a neuron is firing or it is not: This is more like a binary system. Also, there are graded potentials, which are of importance: These are unlike the binary, all-or-none feature of other neurons. I would not focus so much on quantum physics during your undergraduate education for biology.

 

Might I suggest you get a tutor if you feel that your math skills are not up-to-par. I often did such in my undergraduate education for calculus. Prior to that, I hadn't taken a hard math class for over three years.

 

Although your suggestion would sound much better than mine to the student...by the time this student actually get's the necessary education to go into this field...and the courses you suggest and when to take them would make anyone with so/so to OK Math skills and very little in the way of knowledge in the Physics and Quantum Mechanics arena...understandably less anxious than the anxiety and pressure just READING what I have posted as far as what the student should and must know to obtain their goal of working in this field...by the time the student get's to the point and age to get a job...just about everything they have learned pertaining to this field will become obsolete.

 

As an example...years ago students would get a degree in Mechanical Drafting and Design...only to have this degree and ability worth 50 cents and a cup of coffee as with the advent of Computer Designs as well as Computer Software that made the need for such Drafters and Engineers...OBSOLETE.

 

The same can be said about this Field of Work. THE ONLY way that a Grad can remain VIABLE is to have the skills in Physics and Quantum Mechanics as well as have great knowledge of using computers as well as how to work in conjunction with Programmers.

 

Within 5 years Neuroscience will evolve from concentrating on the Bio-Molecular Level that involves the understanding of Neurophysiology dealing with chemical reaction and neural activity...changing to mapping the actual Quantum Activity...which itself is damn near impossible...by using Computer Models. Also using thousands of mapped Genomes of people that have certain diseases of the mind and for some reason or another....are still functional or are in a state of remission.

 

In any way...Cures and Treatments will be taken out of the hands of Knife Wielding Surgeons and Doctors who introduce large infusions of Custom Chemicals and Radiation treatments...and handed to a COMPUTER TECH...who will take a patients Mapped Genome along with specialized Computer Mappings of Neural Activity and run a comparison...then this will be handed to a Doctor/Physicist who will determine just what and where Neural Activity can be tweaked or Rerouted...and then this will be handed to a Geneticist/Chemist who will take this new data and CUSTOM CREATE a personalized Genetically Modified Stem/Neural Cell that will be introduced into the Brain by either a Retro-Virus or more likely by 2020...Nanobots...which have already been developed to get the Modified Stem/Neural Cells to the correct or damaged areas.

 

By 2025...Nanobot Tech. will allow the actual REPAIR of Brain Cells or Neural Pathways...and seeing as we only get a certain number of Brain Cells and once gone...we must use what is left...Stem/Neural Cells Genetically designed to replace or repair entire areas of the Brain will be the method and direction this field is going in...and this is happening NOW! It is not Sci-Fi...it is not in the far future.

 

By the time this kid gets out there...it will be happening and just adding a few MATH courses will NOT be enough for such a student to achieve the goals they set out for themselves.

 

Hey...if they don't want to go through all that and work that hard...FINE! I understand. Just to do so is a commitment of epic proportions.

 

But don't let anyone KID YOU into thinking just because you added some Calculus classes into your studies that this will be enough to do what you state you wish you would like to do.

 

Be TRUE to thy own self.

 

Split Infinity

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Give me some sources, splitinfinity.

 

Here are a few...http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16371951

 

http://www.nature.com/nrn/journal/v7/n1/execsumm/nrn1827.html

 

http://www.foresight.org/nanodot/?cat=26

 

http://neurowww.cwru.edu/gradphd/program

 

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/npp/NeurosciencePhD

 

There is a lot more including sites that the student can go to that will tell them what certain schools require for a student to be even able to apply to enter the post graduate work in this field which is VAST.

 

Split Infinity

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First off, if you want to argue about this, we could request a thread to ourselves.

This person wasn't really asking how to be a multidisplinary neuroscientist.

The field appeared to be narrowed to molecular neuroscience.

 

And in my experience, an individual is often better off establishing him or herself quite well in one realm of neuroscience work and only moving onto another research program due to lack of grants funds, etc.. Yes, there is definitely a way to be a multidisciplinary neuroscientist, and I had advised the calculus course, because there have been introductions of engineering and computer sciences to the realm of neuroscience. Even the forgetting curve, which has its basis in psychology, involves calculus and relates to neuroscience.

 

Alright. My view on this is that even if computer technologies were developed and various nanotechnologies occurred, they're employment would involve understanding of the biochemical, anatomical, and physiological processes that they are going to be working with. I understand that many people hold an appreciation for neural engineering and bioengineering technologies. However, from my experience in studying and reviewing the technologies, from my transhumanist ambitions, the technologies are generally worthless, thus regenerative medicine is a more realistic approach for generating therapeutic technologies. The utility in the engineering technologies is fruitful when they can be used for regeneration in a controlled manner that will not harm the organism.

 

Otherwise, moving toward the harder physics involved with neuroscience and neural engineering is mostly a fool's game for a misguided futurist OR an ambition of a nerd who lacks understanding that grants might not be coming his way for such technologies yet still attempts to develop them. I don't find much utility in these technologies from my current understanding of the neurosciences, thus I often disregard such nanotechnologies. I'm not saying they don't have their place, however. My strong views on the progress of the neurosciences is in my belief that things will be focusing on regeneration along with a person having a sense of consciousness, cognition, and memory. A person with a neurodegenerative disease in the brain more than likely holds appreciation for regeneration of brain tissue, even if that means memories will fade with time: There is paper and pen if anything important does not want to be forgotten.

 

If something is focusing on regenerative medicine or therapeutic medicine in the realm of the neurosciences, I foresee grants and advancement in it. Nonetheless, for nanotechnologies to be of use, the molecular neurobiology of the nervous system needs to be understood. If your argument that an individual is better off being part of the nanotech and computer programming bit that builds upon advancements in molecular neurobiology, thus furthering advancement of technologies using advanced physics, then I can see you argument and the fruitfulness of the research program. However, the limiting agent to such a research program will be the available knowledge of molecular neurobiology and biochemistry. Yes, I can see how as more and more of molecular neurobiology and biochemistry is understood that individuals will eventually progress onto a new research program, because there is little more to study in molecular neurobiology. However, I do not think such a diminishing return in molecular neurobiology will occur by the years you have projected.

 

In 30 to 40 years, I could see that. However, in the next 10? Nah.

 

If I remember correctly, one of the major hurdles in bridging things into advancement is the crystallography process. If that can be simplified and conducted much easier, things would get done much faster. (http://www.cell.com/trends/pharmacological-sciences/abstract/S0165-6147%2812%2900041-7)

 

I was working in an Alzheimer's lab, and there was still much more to explore in the realm of molecular biology. Even if you're able to regenerate tissue with engineered components, there still may be proteins that have not been explored that can lead to disease and breakdown. Furthermore, with a lack of knowledge of the molecular biology of those components, they may have toxic and cumulative effects that the technology does not account for. Similar to neural network programming, things are only as good as that which you have accounted for. As such, one could hope that people could push forward with neural engineering technologies once that which has not be accounted for is insignificant, such as being able to be taken care of by glial cells, thus reducing whatever levels of toxicity that may come about.

Edited by Genecks
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First off, if you want to argue about this, we could request a thread to ourselves.

This person wasn't really asking how to be a multidisplinary neuroscientist.

The field appeared to be narrowed to molecular neuroscience.

 

I for one, have no problem with you two having this conversation in this thread, I would very much like to see where this is going.

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I for one, have no problem with you two having this conversation in this thread, I would very much like to see where this is going.

 

The angle that I am coming from here is given the complexity of this field as well as the quickly evolving manner in which the work in this field is being redirected as well as...well let's be honest...sure...you can probably find work in this field given the courses and time and dedication you might put into it...but if you intend to MAKE MONEY...there are probably other related or non-related fields that you could concentrate upon and in the way I view things....unless you have almost unlimited financial backing for school...long periods of time that you can spend studying and doing...SLAVE WORK...IE...POST GRADUATE SERVITUDE...and let's not forget the sheer ABILITY to work in such a field....I would seriously recommend you looking at the Time/Cost/ Emotional and Physical Investment/....of just being allowed to do work in this field that is related to the JOB making the Big Money...VS...just selecting another field of work that has a Lower Risk/Higher Return than this one does.

 

Sure...you could find work in a Lab where what is being done is cutting edge...BUT NEVER GO ANY FURTHER.

 

This is one of these fields where people will tell you...sure...if you pt your mind to it...anything is possible.

 

The reality is more like...if you want to be able to repay your student loan that is now at a Third World Countries National Debt...all you have to do is take out the HAZMAT Waste every day for the next 30 years and someone might allow you to play with the Electron Microscope.

 

Remember....there are 100's of THOUSANDS of people who can claim they were part of NASA...and Thousands who can claim they touched the Shuttle...and Hundreds who can claim to actually being DECLARED an Astronaut by NASA...and a HANDFUL who actually went into space.

 

Such is the reality of this Field of Work.

 

Ask yourself....what did the person who went and got Doctorates in Astrophysics, Low Gravity Physiology and Astrometrics based Cosmological Mechanics...in order to go into space....was declared to be an Astronaut....only to have the Space Program shut down and thus is working at....CARL'S OUTER SPACE LASER CAR WASH....repairing the Undercarriage Washing System that will spray some SOAPY WATER all over the customers muffler for only $4.99 EXTRA!!??....spend on such an education?

 

Unfortunately this TRIPLE THREAT PHD has been considered OVER QUALIFIED so he is being Let Go in favor of STAN...an 18 year old kid armed with a Mullet and a GED.

 

Split Infinity

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I for one, have no problem with you two having this conversation in this thread, I would very much like to see where this is going.

 

User...I happen to bring up this topic to My Girl...she is brilliant as well as extremely beautiful and I have always counted on her to find and see things that for whatever reason...I cannot.

 

Anyways...after talking a bit with her about about this topic she told me to tell you to spend some time searching the net for the now many existing sites that list everything a student will want or need to know about a field they might want to go into.

 

She told me of how she suggested this to a girl friend of hers and this friend found one of these sites as well as compared what that site had to say about a field of study to what other such sites had to say...and learned what courses she should take as well as what JOB she should direct herself towards as these sites detail what the experts in all these fields of work have to say about where that field of work is heading as well as how viable such jobs will be in the near future as well as 10, 15, 20 years down the road.

 

These sites take everything into consideration including the number of students currently studying to obtain a job in specific fields to how needed graduates of specific studies will be in any specific line of work....Government Grants, Trends, Scientific Advancements, Population Aging specific jobs, the amount of money one can expect to need to get the proper education...and one specific I like very much....PROBABILITY RATIOS.

 

These sites will detail which people are more apt. to get hired based upon what school they went to, where they come from, age, courses taken, specific professors a student had...as well as some specifics most people would not take into consideration as to being a plus or minus upon getting a job.

 

She constantly amazes me with her thoughts upon things and if I were YOU...I would take her advice and spend some time looking at these sites.

 

As an example....her friend found out that after looking at the PROBABILITY section and filling in her information...she had just a 1 in 10,000 plus chance of getting a job in a specific field of work.

 

Split Infinity

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hello world. [The obiliatory] Sorry if this is in the wrong section, this is my first post on here. Forgive my wall of text/mini rant.

 

I have some anxieties about graduate school and was hoping for a bit of guidance; I am nearing the end of the second semester of my junior year so I will be applying to grad schools before long and wanted to hear your thoughts on some things. I am working toward my B.S. in psychology with a biology minor and I have realized that the area I really want to go into is neuroscience, in particular I think I am leaning toward the molecular/cellular side of neuroscience/neurobiology. I chose a psych major because the brain has always been of interest to me but I've come to realize that psychology is not where my heart is, it's down in the proteins and the DNA. My major interest is really in neurodengerative disease, everything about the entire spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders is simultaneously utterly fascinating and the most tragic thing I am capable of imagining, both reasons why I want to pursue the topic. I have questions about these disorders for which answers do not yet exist and I think if I'm going to find my answers anywhere then it's on a molecular scale.

 

In looking at graduate schools, almost all seem to say something along the lines that competitive undergrads have taken courses in calculus/organic chem/physics/advanced bio. The thing that makes me anxious is that by the time I graduate I will not have taken organic chem, physics, or calc. I've got bio under my belt, and by the time I graduate I'll have done general chem. However, I haven't taken calc or physics because I am terrified to death by math, and by extension physics (high school physics was one of the worst expereinces of my academic life, though it likely was just because of my teacher I've been put off from physics ever since). Additionally, there was a hiccup in me getting general chem done (the first time I tried to take it, the classes filled up before I could register and the second time I learned that my math prereq for psych did not qualify me for chem, so I had to waste a semester taking a 100 level math class). Frankly, that single greatest regret I have about my undergrad career is that I'm not going to get to take organic (or biochem).

 

That said, I'll will have taken two semesters of general chem, genetics, two semesters of anatomy/physiology, molecular bio, a molecular bio lab, cell bio, the lower level bio (two semesters of intro bio, biodiversity), sensation & perception, psychopharmacology, physiological psych, behavioral stats, and any other science that I can cram in in the next two semesters. I have a 3.6 GPA, I haven't taken the GRE yet but I'm studying for them, I have begun working in my schools lab for comparative neuropsychology so I'll have about a year under my belt when I graduate. I'll have three reccomendation leters from faculty who actually know me- one from the lab, two from biopsych professors who I have TA'ed for (one is chair of the department, the other recieved her Ph.D. in molecular neuro if that adds anything). Finally, I have been trying to learn organic on my own, I can't say that I took the class but at least I can say that I put in the effort to acquire the knowledge, right?

 

What I'm trying to get at is, does my lack of organic and physics totally kill my shot? I know it puts me at a disadvantage and I don't claim I'm ivy league, but I do know a thing or two about a neuron or two. If I were interested in something like cognitive neuro then I would not be as worried because alot of schools say that that requirements for acceptance are flexible, but in going for molecular- I just don't know. I just need someone to put a pipette in my hand and give me the opportunity to show that I am capable of doing something astounding. Can I just get some thoughts, please?

Okay, so you want to study neuro degenerative diseases. the best way to do that is to ditch the psychology, as that is cultural, and then ditch the physics, as that is about nature.

 

Once you have done that, you should look up a bit of something that covers conductors in the brain, as the whole thing with a disease of the nervous system, comes from reduced current in the brain and nervous system.

 

I have always said that the brain does not store memories, as they are in effect rebounding in the nervous system, through sensations. the memories you have always rebound in the nervous system, as they are carries over nerves.

 

If you want to cure diseases of the nervous system, or something like that, I suggest you look into producing your own degree! If you were the first to postulate the degree with the diseases, you could become like uber famous!

 

So, read up on conductivity, biology and in biology specialise on white blood cells and red blood cells, as they fight diseases, and then maybe a bit of your own tests, if you can find funding. Of course, you could go somewhere great with this, but the way typical people in the field go is with a separate course anyways. if you could take this course and turn it into a degree, sky is the limit.

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you should look up a bit of something that covers conductors in the brain, as the whole thing with a disease of the nervous system, comes from reduced current in the brain and nervous system.

This doesn't make any sense. Perhaps it would help to actually study the brain and nervous system prior to pontificating about how it functions or giving recommendations to others pertaining to how best to explore it?
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Okay, so you want to study neuro degenerative diseases. the best way to do that is to ditch the psychology, as that is cultural, and then ditch the physics, as that is about nature.

 

Once you have done that, you should look up a bit of something that covers conductors in the brain, as the whole thing with a disease of the nervous system, comes from reduced current in the brain and nervous system.

 

I have always said that the brain does not store memories, as they are in effect rebounding in the nervous system, through sensations. the memories you have always rebound in the nervous system, as they are carries over nerves.

 

If you want to cure diseases of the nervous system, or something like that, I suggest you look into producing your own degree! If you were the first to postulate the degree with the diseases, you could become like uber famous!

 

So, read up on conductivity, biology and in biology specialise on white blood cells and red blood cells, as they fight diseases, and then maybe a bit of your own tests, if you can find funding. Of course, you could go somewhere great with this, but the way typical people in the field go is with a separate course anyways. if you could take this course and turn it into a degree, sky is the limit.

 

I don't thin he should dump the PHYSICS as cures for such diseases will be developed by way of Genetic Engineering as well such "CURES" will be introduced into a persons body by way of Retrovirus or perhaps by way of blood stream injection of Millions of Nano Robotic Machines designed to either destroy by a variety of methods a complex filament spread cancer or such Nano Robots could introduce Chemicals, Radioactive Materials or Genetically Engineered Cells.

 

So if a person wants to be in the thick of such Tech and Cures...they are going to have to have an understanding of Physics and since such Nano Robotics will need to use the Cells of the Human Body as a way to power themselves as well Genetic Engineered Cures would require a person to need an understanding of Physics on at the very least the Atomic Level and Sub Atomic and Quantum Level for Nano apps...Physics will be something a person in this field in the very near future would consider a necessity to know and understand.

 

Split Infinity

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