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The Omni Equation


Notexceling
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I believe I have answered your question numerous times.

 

I am not dismissing any of Cantors phenomenal work.

 

The infinity your quoting is still within the confounds of the number 1.

Again, 1 explains it has an Infinite amount of possibilities within itself  (decimals, fractions etc) even though it has a bound and an end, a 100% complete value.

 

It also explains the infinite possiblities by reproducing itself. 

 

 It is illogical to think Absolute Infinity is within the restrictions of mathematics.

Wouldn't it be beyond our numerical values (1), our universal laws(+|-), our time and space?

I'm showing you an equation that is trying to justify beyond Cantor.

The Absolute Infinity that can never have boundaries.

 

1+= ∞ 

outside of our 

(+|-) or (1)

 

Cantors work has just been mislabeled as infinity, it is actually just the number 1.

Literally think outside the box.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I believe I have answered your question numerous times.

 

I am not dismissing any of Cantors phenomenal work.

 

The infinity your quoting is still within the confounds of the number 1.

 

 

Even countable infinities cardinally dominate 1.

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Any infinity that can be calculated is subject to the number 1 in one way or another.

 

Name me 1 infinity amongst the many sizes of Infinity (besides absolute infinity) that is not a Part of 1?

 

 

 

All of them. You've not demonstrated that any infinity is part of 1.

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All of them. You've not demonstrated that any infinity is part of 1.

 

Do I really need to explain it?

 

Cantor showed infinity with fractions, decimal points or parts of 1.

 

Again I ask how can the true absolute infinity be within mathematics that is restricted by 1 and governing laws?

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Do I really need to explain it?

 

You're on a science forum, so yes.

 

Cantor showed infinity with fractions, decimal points or parts of 1.

 

No, he didn't. Oh, by the way, I actually get paid to do philosophy in this area. Try actually reading Cantor.

 

Again I ask how can the true absolute infinity be within mathematics that is restricted by 1 and governing laws?

 

There is no "true absolute infinity". In fact, there is at minimum a countably infinitely many sizes of infinity. All of which cardinally dominate 1. Which you'd know, if you'd have read the guy you keep namedropping.

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