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Introductions to physics


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I saw that Caps has made ''introductions to calculus'' which I thought was a reasonable introduction but could have been expanded. I feel perhaps these things could be good for people who come here directly asking questions about specific topics and could be redirected to these introductions.

 

Has anyone thought of doing this for physics? If no one has, I'd be willing to write up a few posts and let it be continued by people who have more time.

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I saw that Caps has made ''introductions to calculus'' which I thought was a reasonable introduction but could have been expanded. I feel perhaps these things could be good for people who come here directly asking questions about specific topics and could be redirected to these introductions.

 

Has anyone thought of doing this for physics? If no one has, I'd be willing to write up a few posts and let it be continued by people who have more time.

The purpose of my website was for just that reason. I'd be more than happy to give it to anyone who wants it. http://home.comcast.net/~peter.m.brown/- My hope was that people would find it useful. My dream is to get feed back so I can make it better

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With the greatest respect, have you any experience of successfully teaching physics at an introductory level?

 

What do you remember about your own introduction to physics?

What stuck in your mind as good or bad?

Edited by studiot
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With the greatest respect, have you any experience of successfully teaching physics at an introductory level?

 

 

Easily capable of teaching physics. I passed my Higher Diploma in physics, so for those wanting to know physics, I can easily teach them.

 

 

Mind you... did anyone question caps ability to teach calculus... I don't mean to down-grade his work, but I think some things could have been taught with a bit more clarity?

 

Don't question the man, as I say, question the work.

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I really don't know if you can teach the subject or not. Maybe you are a natural.

 

However knowing the subject and teaching it are two very different things. Many a knowledgeable expert is totally incapable of passing on that knowledge.

 

This is not an exercise in mud slinging. If you would like to try out a short 'test piece' I expect you will find some helpful (and the opposite) criticism.

 

How about an explanation of resonance?

Beginners often struggle over this one.

Edited by studiot
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Easily capable of teaching physics. I passed my Higher Diploma in physics, so for those wanting to know physics, I can easily teach them.

 

That doesn't actually answer the question. Having a degree doesn't automatically confer the ability to teach.

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That doesn't actually answer the question. Having a degree doesn't automatically confer the ability to teach.

 

Do you have a degree?

 

 

If you do, what gives you the right then, to agree to teach, because, I think if you should if you have a degree, you might be able to teach... do you think you are capable of that?

 

Let me put it this way... why are you spending your time on a forum teaching people... with a degree... without the degree of certainty you can teach?

Edited by Aethelwulf
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Do you have a degree?

 

Yes.

 

If you do, what gives you the right then, to agree to teach, because, I think if you should if you have a degree, you might be able to teach... do you think you are capable of that?

 

Let me put it this way... why are you spending your time on a forum teaching people... with a degree... without the degree of certainty you can teach?

 

I do it because I enjoy it. But that's a separate question. My degree does not guarantee that I'm any good at it.

 

Now for the answer to the question that you didn't ask: I have taught. As a TA as both an undergraduate and graduate student. More to the point, I was trained to teach and taught, 20-22 hours per week lecturing the first two years, when I was in the navy. For 4.5 years. (And when I say trained, I don't mean I was handed a piece of chalk and to told to go at it, like university professors often start out. Actual training, culminating with a series of certification lectures, the last one before the commanding officer) BTW, when I started out, before the training, I wasn't very good. Few were.

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Yes.

 

 

 

I do it because I enjoy it. But that's a separate question. My degree does not guarantee that I'm any good at it.

 

 

Oh... be quiet please...

 

The rest of me wants to help people here..not deter them... Your attitude is against... not for.

 

If anything you should have said... ''go ahead..'' If you are capable... what have you to to prove so much that an entire explanation suffices? I certainly wouldn't.

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Many of us here have degrees and higher degrees and know that they do not qualify us to teach. To be frank I have learnt more about teaching on internet forums than anywhere else - my degrees were on substantive subjects (law, criminal law, and criminal justice) not on the methods of imparting this knowledge to students. Whilst knowing a subject is a prerequisite to teaching, mere knowledge is not sufficient.

 

I will be honest - I find some of your posts on physics confused, unhelpful, and prolix; this is the sort of incorrect approach that is guarded against by those who have been taught how to educate. And on the subject of fitness to teach - what's a "Higher Diploma in physics"; from another thread I had gained the impression you were English and I don't recognize that as an English qualification (Scots perhaps)? I realise that O'levels, A'levels, and degrees (Bachelors, Masters, Doctorate) are seen as a little passe by educationalists - but they are still the norm in England aren't they?

 

Oh and in the interests of openness - I neg repped your previous post. My reasons were that you asked a question, got an answer you weren't really expecting and reacting by dismissively telling another member to be quiet.

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Many of us here have degrees and higher degrees and know that they do not qualify us to teach. To be frank I have learnt more about teaching on internet forums than anywhere else - my degrees were on substantive subjects (law, criminal law, and criminal justice) not on the methods of imparting this knowledge to students. Whilst knowing a subject is a prerequisite to teaching, mere knowledge is not sufficient.

 

I will be honest - I find some of your posts on physics confused, unhelpful, and prolix; this is the sort of incorrect approach that is guarded against by those who have been taught how to educate. And on the subject of fitness to teach - what's a "Higher Diploma in physics"; from another thread I had gained the impression you were English and I don't recognize that as an English qualification (Scots perhaps)? I realise that O'levels, A'levels, and degrees (Bachelors, Masters, Doctorate) are seen as a little passe by educationalists - but they are still the norm in England aren't they?

 

Oh and in the interests of openness - I neg repped your previous post. My reasons were that you asked a question, got an answer you weren't really expecting and reacting by dismissively telling another member to be quiet.

 

Who cares?

 

This isn't a classroom, this is a forum. I find all this way too serious.

 

We have people coming into this forum asking ''can you teach me relativity?'' Wouldn't it be easier and nice if we had an introductions page to such things, saves us the hassle repeating ourselves?

Edited by Aethelwulf
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