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END OF MILKYWAY GALAXY!!!


Harish Kumar.A
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  • 9 months later...

I believe the Sun will become a red giant in 4-5 Billion years and consume the Earth, a little after the Milky Way and Andromeda become Milkydromeda. The two events are otherwise unrelated, as far as I know.

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Interesting topic, Who knows by the time it happens if humanity is still around we will probably be dispersed among other planets as well on colonies. Who knows, but im sure we would find a way to avoid "doomsday" if that were to be the case of what was going to happen.

I think i would have to agree with many of the previous posters that there would be a very small chance of anything colliding with each other when the galaxies did merge, And it would take around 100 lifetimes for them to merge together properly i think.

Astronomy has always fascinated me, There are so many mysteries still up there in space we have no clue about. If you think of things on a large scale we know very little about space. it's so vast,beautiful and unexplored.

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If one believes the prediction of Marshall T. Savage in his book The Millennial Project: Colonizing the Galaxy in Eight Easy Steps, we will have already explored much of the Milky Way by the time of Milkydromeda. If we survive that long, perhaps another 100 life times will be enough to colonize Milkydromeda. However, the search for extra terrestrial intelligence (SETI) has not succeeded (Fermi paradox). If we will inhabit the galaxy, why not an extra terrestrial intelligence? I hope we make it, even if no one else has.

Edited by EdEarl
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~4-5 billion years from now seems to be a common denominator for a variety of events, given that the sun goes out and becomes a red giant while at the same time the earth's interior magma decreases. You could say that the human race are beyond condemned, unless we somehow manage to travel outside our galaxy.

 

I don't believe that's necessary. Let's assume that there won't be any major obstacles to impede our long-term growth overall (or if there are, that we'll be able to recover quickly, relatively speaking for a few billion years). This should include natural disasters, mass war, etc.

 

The exponential rate at which our technological capabilities grow should certainly make up in time. I'm not saying this on a strictly scientific basis, but we should reach a point where we can defend ourselves completely in the event of even a stellar system collision.

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Not sure if we should worry too much about the collision with Andromeda. besides, most likely the collision won't actually cause many stars to collide. Nevertheless, we should watch out during the next billion of years.

 

I think our past history is just as interesting. Earth once had two moons, what do you guys think?

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Edited by Phi for All
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A direct hit by two stars during the Andromeda, Milky Way collision is unlikely. I assume most stars are surrounded by Ort Clouds. If a star from Andromeda passes near our Sun, the interaction of the two Ort Clouds could cause an increase of Comets coming toward us.

Edited by EdEarl
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Several posters seem to be ignoring the fact that 3 billion years is three order of magnitudes longer than the time separating us from our last common ancestor with the ancestor of chimpanzees. Do you think it likely that humans will still exist?

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Several posters seem to be ignoring the fact that 3 billion years is three order of magnitudes longer than the time separating us from our last common ancestor with the ancestor of chimpanzees. Do you think it likely that humans will still exist?

 

 

Yes I do think the human race will still exist - but I suppose that's the baseless monkey optimism that the guys at that pub near barnard star were ribbing me about just last week

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Several posters seem to be ignoring the fact that 3 billion years is three order of magnitudes longer than the time separating us from our last common ancestor with the ancestor of chimpanzees. Do you think it likely that humans will still exist?

Very good point, Surely by that point we will have developed somewhat from the Humans we are today. On top of that Im sure by then we will have technology advanced to a point where we may be able to defend against some cataclysmic occurrences.

In reards to a post above, I believe no race will exist by the time any of this happens, There will be so many people with different lines of human ancestry that we will become one big race, it would be almost impossible to have a Pure race at this point in time.

anyway even if some kind of alines came to earth now, do you think they would view us as different "breeds" of humans or races, or do you think they would just characterize us a humans who adapted over so many years to their climates?

 

 

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Yes I do think the human race will still exist - but I suppose that's the baseless monkey optimism that the guys at that pub near barnard star were ribbing me about just last week

Single cell organisms ruled for a very long time before the evolution of multicellular organisms; afterwards, evolution went into overdrive. The human race may change soon after the AGI singularity. I think evolution is accelerating.

 

In an case, when Milkydromeda forms, our sun could be tossed out of the galaxy.

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