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I can also say that I have run Windows in a native partition as a guest OS on VMware hosted on Suse Linux and it performed as a native OS on the machine. In full screen mode you could not tell you were using virtualization when using Windows.

I've wanted to set up something like this in the past...

 

I dual boot windows & ubuntu (though honestly I hardly ever use windows applications anymore). Is it possible to run that windows partition through a virtual box on the linux side? I think that's what you're doing but I'm not sure.

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Notebook Linux and desktop Window, or notebook Window and desktop Linux, might be better to use. Dual booting will have some trouble about file usage, we will confuse which is Linux file and which one is windows.

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Notebook Linux and desktop Window, or notebook Window and desktop Linux, might be better to use. Dual booting will have some trouble about file usage, we will confuse which is Linux file and which one is windows.

 

which ever it is ,it is not not the system its with the OS.and until the boot kernals are there and are not messed there should'n be any problem with the file systems

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Notebook Linux and desktop Window, or notebook Window and desktop Linux, might be better to use. Dual booting will have some trouble about file usage, we will confuse which is Linux file and which one is windows.

 

False... dual booting requires partitioning the harddrive so there are no conflicts.

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I'm Linux all the way, and have been for years. I can do stuff on Linux, and I can download all the software i need for free, and not

have to worry about installing it, just get it from the Repository. I'm using PCLOS LXDE, which is fast, nice looking and full of features.

It's written to be friendly to people who are used to Windows.

 

It has a great 'shell' which I can write scripts for, that can do most anything I want. MS neglected the Windows shell for years until

they discovered they were loosing people to the 'nixes, but their new shell still has a way to catch up.

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which ever it is ,it is not not the system its with the OS.and until the boot kernals are there and are not messed there should'n be any problem with the file systems

 

 

False... dual booting requires partitioning the harddrive so there are no conflicts.

 

OS or Installing have no problem.

User usage problem. Sometimes I am confused which one is Linux or window file.

Is there big difference between two kinds of files in the file system. But, if we use it carefully, it will be no problem.

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OS or Installing have no problem.

User usage problem. Sometimes I am confused which one is Linux or window file.

Is there big difference between two kinds of files in the file system. But, if we use it carefully, it will be no problem.

 

There's more than one way to add Linux to your Windows. One is simply to install it on a old box you have around,

because it runs fine with less memory and speed, another is to partition the Windows drive and add it, can be a bit

tricky. Another is to get a new hard drive and install Linux on it, and put it alongside your Windows drive. Safe and

easy to do, but you need to know how to dual boot with two hard drives, usually just need to add two lines to a

text file but you need to know what two lines and whot file.

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I've wanted to set up something like this in the past...

 

I dual boot windows & ubuntu (though honestly I hardly ever use windows applications anymore). Is it possible to run that windows partition through a virtual box on the linux side? I think that's what you're doing but I'm not sure.

Yes, it is possible. Under virtualbox it is called raw disk access and in vmware it is called physical disk. I do not particularly recommend it even though it is possible. Tuning it is a nightmare. What you are basically doing is configuring windows to run with 2 different sets of hardware just like you pulled the hard drive from one machine, dropped it in another and booted it. With enough configuration you can make a native windows partition boot natively or boot inside a vbox but windows will see the two as different hardware sets.

 

I have good performance installing windows as a guest os inside a linux vbox and then giving it access to read and write data to a native windows partition elsewhere on the drive I use for dual booting. This way I can boot a vbox with Windows while I'm running linux and access something like an Excel spreadsheet in my Windows partition if needed. I find the need to do this much less now that I've moved most of the office documents I share with other users to Google docs. It is nowhere near the necessity that it used to be.

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