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Kylonicus

Neural Regeneration

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Howdy, I am working on a cure for bipolar, schizophrenia, autism, stupidity, stroke, and Alzheimers.

 

I am primarily trying to due research on neurotrophic agents, synaptogenic agents, agents that reverse maturation, and neurogensis in purkinje cells or the adult cerebral cortex.

 

I have 2 out of 6 of those conditions.

 

Anyway, so I spend ALOT of my time doing research and all I want is for the cures to be made.

 

Anyway,

 

You can double check everything I say at pubmed, go to google, pubmedat national institute of health

 

What I have come up with so far is,

 

- That Glial cells inhibit synaptogensis, due to mylenination, the synapses can't easily connect to the Axons because they are insulated. Thus, steroidic acids may be able to demyleninate axons, and possibly allowing increased synaptogensis.

 

- Neurogensis often follows possible synaptogensis, which makes sense, because why should the brain differeniate new neurons, if they can't make synapses. Or like buying computer chips which you can never put into your computer, can't usem why havem.

 

- Progesterone is an extremely powerful neurosteroid. It is a neurotrophic agent(mood stablizer), an anti-pyschotic, and unfortunately a depressant. But it can induce and tends to induce neurogensis in baby mice brains.

 

- The primarily culprit besides mylenination for maturation of the cerebral cortex, and therefore the inability to make more neurons and make new synapses is known as Notch signaling. Notch signaling is upregulated when neurons make new synapses, and down regulated when neurons lose synapses. If you use a notch signaling inhibitor on a bunch of neurons, they act as if they are immature, and then sprout a huge excess number of synapses.

 

Anyway I have more stuff, but that's pretty much the core of it. I have some ideas for treatments but I don't wanna post them right now.

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This avenue might be relevent to Alzheimer's and possibly strokes, but bipolar disorders, schizophrenia, autism, and stupidity? I don't see how synaptogenesis/neurogenesis would be of any use in these.

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Specific portions of the brain can enhance intelligence, i.e concentration portions of the brain, memory parts of the brain, abstract thought ect...

 

They have linked the size of weirneckes area, the part of the left temporal lobe responsible for meaning and understanding, to intelligence, and IQ scores. It also acts as an extremely good neuroregulator, it manages the frontal lobe.

 

In people who are Autistic, weirneckes area tends to be smaller, which in turn would explain mental retardation and at the same time the lack of understanding of social cues.

 

In people with Asperger's syndrome, I presume that a large parietal lobe makes up for the inadequacies of a small weirneckes area. The parietal lobe can also neuroregulate the frontal lobe, however it is not as effective as weirneckes area in doing so.

 

In people who area schizophrenic, which means possibly bipolar as both diseases are strongly related, the parietal lobe, among other things has a tendency to overactive, and that probably means that it's compensating for a faulty weirneckes area.

 

A highly developed and used parietal lobe would allow for better understanding of spatial/mathematical things, as well as increase your logic skills.

 

So you see, if we enlarge weirneckes area by inducing growth specifically in this part of the brain, and the number of synapses, then we can increase intelligence, and eradicate three extremely horrific diseases.

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Specific portions of the brain can enhance intelligence, i.e concentration portions of the brain, memory parts of the brain, abstract thought ect...

 

They have linked the size of weirneckes area, the part of the left temporal lobe responsible for meaning and understanding, to intelligence, and IQ scores. It also acts as an extremely good neuroregulator, it manages the frontal lobe.

 

In people who are Autistic, weirneckes area tends to be smaller, which in turn would explain mental retardation and at the same time the lack of understanding of social cues.

 

In people with Asperger's syndrome, I presume that a large parietal lobe makes up for the inadequacies of a small weirneckes area. The parietal lobe can also neuroregulate the frontal lobe, however it is not as effective as weirneckes area in doing so.

 

In people who area schizophrenic, which means possibly bipolar as both diseases are strongly related, the parietal lobe, among other things has a tendency to overactive, and that probably means that it's compensating for a faulty weirneckes area.

 

A highly developed and used parietal lobe would allow for better understanding of spatial/mathematical things, as well as increase your logic skills.

 

So you see, if we enlarge weirneckes area by inducing growth specifically in this part of the brain, and the number of synapses, then we can increase intelligence, and eradicate three extremely horrific diseases.

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OK...I did a little tiny bit of neurobiology and I'm by no means an expert but I rather think the brain of a person (i.e. Homo sapiens) is vastly complicated....I look forward to you publications in peer reviewed journals...when might they appear?

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OK...I did a little tiny bit of neurobiology and I'm by no means an expert but I rather think the brain of a person (i.e. Homo sapiens) is vastly complicated....I look forward to you publications in peer reviewed journals...when might they appear?

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OK....that was sarcastic...I apologise...but where are you publishing this?

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OK....that was sarcastic...I apologise...but where are you publishing this?

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I'm certainly not a scientist, but I do have a four out of six of those conditions. If possible I would like SOMEONE to cure these conditions, so that I wouldn't have to live with them anymore. That's basically why I am posting. I can use all the knowledge I have collected, and combined it with your highly efficient and correctly proportioned brains, to try and solve this problem.

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A cure for stupidity? Hehehe good luck! I'm working on a cure for negative and violent behavior, but maybe we could pool our gathered info.

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So long as the negative behavior isn't intentional(such as someone being extremely aggressive in business to make more money), much of that is generated by a lack of executive functioning, or an inability to adapt to societies demands(such as kids with ADHD in class rooms, being class clowns). If people have the proper executive functioning, then the rest of negative or violent behavior becomes a matter of choice, circumstance, or culture. However, it would be possible to neurologically alter someone so that the part of the brain which deals with delayed gratification is larger. This would make alot of people non violent, and if we increased the penalty for commiting criminal acts, people would probably not commit them nearly as often.

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BTW daisy, I get my research from other scientist who are specialist in the field, it's wasn't my original theory that autism was caused by a fault weirneckes area, that was a theory proposed by a neurologist working in the field. It's also been demonstrated by the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation.

 

The part about the parietal lobe regulating the brain, I also learned that somewhere else.

 

I get most of my research from published scientist, I do draw conclusions but most of it comes from credible sources.

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Kylonicus,

 

I think that it's easy to fall into concentrating one's attention too heavily on any one area of the brain as the 'magic' area. The most likely candidates for this are Wernicke's area, Broca's area, and the Inferior Parietal Lobule (mostly the Angular Gyrus).

 

However, the problem with this viewpoint is that it is a result of an outdated model of the brain. There was a time when the brain was seen as modularized. All these little areas did their little things and that was that. This was a result of the limitations of technology. You have to realize that much of our knowledge of the brain is a result of studying damaged brains of epileptics while testing them to determine which areas are 'safe' to be removed. While this surely has increased knowledge of the brain, it has also led to many misconclusions.

 

Nowadays, with MRI technology, we're beginning to see that the functioning of the brain is far more spread out and redundant than was once thought.

 

Sure. If you damage Broca's area then you end up with Broca's Aphasia and are unable to speak and write. However, you can think of this area of the brain as more of a gate for a wider area of the brain rather than the center of function. If you damage Broca's area then all the information processed in other areas of the brain that pass through this 'junction' is stopped cold. With the result being the inability to speak.

 

The same can be said for the other areas of the brain under discussion.

We've a long way to go in understanding the functioning of the brain and part of that journey is in getting past what we already 'know'.

 

 

Also. There is a possibility that the correlation between a diminished Wernicke's area in the various disorders does not cause the disorder but is rather a consequence of it. One must be careful to not jump to conclusions too quickly.

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Your probably right about it not being localized in any one area. However, I do believe with the capacity to regenerate the brain we could begin to restructure the brain to solve many of the problems.

 

I believe that if certain parts of an autistic brain were enlarged, it would probably eliminate some if not all of the symptoms of autism.

 

It may take more than one area, but I believe that it's possible.

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I believe that neural regeneration can occur if three major factors are taken care of.

 

1) Myelin inhibitory factors(can be taken care of with myelin inhibitory factor antibodies, or the usage of GAP-43)

2) Notch signaling(which is heavily used for celluar differenitation, and can be downregulated by eliminating sex hormones. There is also some ancedotal evidence that the MAP-K pathway could downregulate it. And it can also be downregulated by a presenilin-gamma secretase complex antibody)

3) Neurotrophic factors(which area necessary for both the proliferation, and the survival of neurons. Proliferation must occur naturally, and the survival of neurons while migrating must also be taken care of.)

 

I believe I have the solution to the problem, and will communicate it's solution via e-mail or private messaging(if this works, then for legal purposes, I need not to have it publicly displayed.)

 

Essentially, theres enough information here to give the general idea, but not enough to render me inaccessible to patent rights if I succeed(which I eat, breath and sleep this, night and day).

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