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What’s the Trick to Sleeping?


lesbianwalrus
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What’s the trick to sleeping? At night, I usually lie in bed for hours before I finally doze off. The harder I try to sleep, the longer it takes. On the other hand, I’ve watched, with jealousy, people fall asleep within a matter of seconds! What am I missing here? Is there a trick to it? And don’t tell me to count sheep, that never works!

 

 

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I have had cases where I've been running 12km every other day and been working physically for eight hour+ shifts and had issues sleeping. When exercise doesn't cut it, I have occasionally used Melatonin to sleep, but I find after two or three nights I will have to try something else--or simply not get enough sleep for a few days. When I'm worried about something I don't sleep. It can be very small things that set it off, like a comment made in a conversation that leaves me uneasy. So I guess for me finding a way to resolve my inner conflicts without directly confronting them would be a solution. For you it might be a matter of finding a deeper reason like I just did . . . . or go see your doctor; the less drug dependent the better though right? Visit a psychologist!

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Also, consider reading in bed.

But don't read anything interesting. Economics textbooks are good for falling asleep.

 

Also avoid reading anything that will make you angry or bewildered. Anything written by Republicans will keep you up gnashing your teeth and coughing due to the smoke coming from your ears.

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If your insomnia issues are pondering-related (ie worrying about money, job, place in life) try to replace those by thinking up an entire dream world. Try to be as creative and detailed as possible, and append stuff to it every time you suffer from not being able to fall asleep. Works for me.

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  1. Refrain from caffeine after 12 noon.
  2. Engage in significant physical exertion during the day, but not near bedtime.
  3. Although alcohol is a depressant, your brain will stimulate itself to counteract it, and this can lead to lack of a restful night's sleep.
  4. Develop a healthy world view and a productive attitude toward resolving problems in order to minimize the "things" that are "on your mind".

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If I can't get to sleep it's usually because some problem or conflict is occupying my mind. If that is the case I find it helps to think out any solution that seems at least remotely plausible. I think a brain at bedtime can accept an unlikely solution in order to ease itself, even if that solution proves impractical in the morning.

Edited by TonyMcC
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Write down what you're thinking so you no longer feel the unconscious pressure to hold on to those thoughts... They are safe on paper or in your notebook and you can release them from your mind... Like finally setting down a heavy weight you've been burdened with carrying. The relaxation effect is almost immediate if you just write it or speak what's swirling though your brain into a recorder.

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Write down what you're thinking so you no longer feel the unconscious pressure to hold on to those thoughts... They are safe on paper or in your notebook and you can release them from your mind... Like finally setting down a heavy weight you've been burdened with carrying. The relaxation effect is almost immediate if you just write it or speak what's swirling though your brain into a recorder.

 

I will most definitely give this a try, it sounds very reasonable in its logic.

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  • Develop a healthy world view and a productive attitude toward resolving problems in order to minimize the "things" that are "on your mind".

 

Easier said than done. But, hey, I'll give it a shot!

 

 

 

 

Write down what you're thinking so you no longer feel the unconscious pressure to hold on to those thoughts... They are safe on paper or in your notebook and you can release them from your mind... Like finally setting down a heavy weight you've been burdened with carrying. The relaxation effect is almost immediate if you just write it or speak what's swirling though your brain into a recorder.

 

I whole-heartily agree here. And in fact, I’d go as far as to say that that is not only beneficial to one’s sleep, but also beneficial to a person’s mental well-being altogether.

 

 

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Just be sure not to wait until right when you're ready to go to bed. Sometimes, you have a lot on your mind and the writing takes a while. Best to start 15-20 minutes before you're ready to set your head on the pillow. It won't work every time, and there's no miracle cure or silver bullet, but it often helps... and when coupled with extra exercise and no caffeine after 11am - noon, many of the insomniacs challenges ought to be greatly reduced. Then, all you need is a comfortable bed. Obviously, if you're stressed about sleeping under a bridge and you're laying on wet stinky concrete, simple journaling may not be enough to ameliorate what you're facing.

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I've also been researching the affects of electromagnetic radiation (such as that from cell phones, laptops, microwave ovens and so on) and it is said massive exposure to this radiation can contribute of mental fatigue, increased difficulty of concentration, and loss of sleep. I've noticed this myself in which I live in the city where we are exposed to large amounts of electromagnetic radiation on a daily basis. But when I go to camping up in northern Michigan, where it is mostly wilderness, I sleep like a log. I imagine that chemical polution also plays a significant role in this.

Edited by lesbianwalrus
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I've also been researching the affects of electromagnetic radiation (such as that from cell phones, laptops, microwave ovens and so on) and it is said massive exposure to this radiation can contribute of mental fatigue, increased difficulty of concentration, and loss of sleep. I've noticed this myself in which I live in the city where we are exposed to large amounts of electromagnetic radiation on a daily basis.

That effect is not about electromagnetic radiation. It's about continual stimulation and information overload. When you sleep better out in the wilderness, it's generally because you're away from a wifi connection or a decent cell tower, and it's also much quieter and darker without city noise.

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