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Question from youtube video about blackbody radiation


qijino1236
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For this topic you must watch this video first... http://www.youtube.c...hU&feature=fvsr

 

 

He says...

 

 

"And those things(atoms) are charged so they "OUGHT" to interact with the electromagnetic field. So that means they ought to be able to give some energy to electromagnetic waves. So doesn't that mean that light gets to play? "

 

 

What does he mean by they "ought" to interact ...that is a vague term...does that mean that physicists are just "guessing" that this interaction is occurring or have there been scientific tests done?. And what does he mean by light gets to play?...

 

apparently that video link did post..http: //www.youtube. com/ watch?v=jbxty6aDfhU&feature=fvsr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"hotter objects give off a lot more light than cooler objects"… So then how I can some leds give off the same lumens as incandescent light but be not as hot?

Edited by qijino1236
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For this topic you must watch this video first... http://www.youtube.c...hU&feature=fvsr

 

 

He says...

 

 

"And those things(atoms) are charged so they "OUGHT" to interact with the electromagnetic field. So that means they ought to be able to give some energy to electromagnetic waves. So doesn't that mean that light gets to play? "

 

 

What does he mean by they "ought" to interact ...that is a vague term...does that mean that physicists are just "guessing" that this interaction is occurring or have there been scientific tests done?. And what does he mean by light gets to play?...

 

It's just how he's phrasing the question "Does this concept apply to light?" and the answer, of course, is yes. He's saying that we expect this to be true, because charged particles interact with electric fields

 

 

 

"hotter objects give off a lot more light than cooler objects"… So then how I can some leds give off the same lumens as incandescent light but be not as hot?

 

LEDs are not emitting a blackbody spectrum, i.e. it's not because they are hot. They emit light because electrons can make a transition between states of the semiconductor and we engineer the materials to have an energy drop that gives us visible photons.

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We expect this to be true, because charged particles interact with electric fields ...

 

We expect ... but do we know... has there been a scientific test done?

 

On blackbody emissions? Just many thousands of them; this dates back more than a century. It's the kind of field that's so old and well-established that other areas of science and industry are based on the principle.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_body

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