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Free time now, work later


Incendia
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What if the order of time we go to work/school and free time were reserved?

 

Work/School would be at the end of the day, rather than at the beginning.

Over-sleeping would cut into your own spare time rather than work/school time, so there would be little excuse for being late. Also, you'd go to sleep soon after you returned home from work/school, and sleep provides good stress relief. I'm pretty sure there is scientific evidence for sleeping after learning helping those learnt things being remembered.

Seems like reversing our daily schedules would benefit the economy and intelligence/work capability...or maybe not, let see.

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You can test this easily, without changing anything about your work/school. Instead of reversing your whole schedule, simply go to bed as soon as you get home from work/school. Sleep eight hours and wake up to free time.

 

Try it for a week, keep a journal on the effects and let us know how it works out.

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What if the order of time we go to work/school and free time were reserved?

 

Work/School would be at the end of the day, rather than at the beginning.

Over-sleeping would cut into your own spare time rather than work/school time, so there would be little excuse for being late. Also, you'd go to sleep soon after you returned home from work/school, and sleep provides good stress relief. I'm pretty sure there is scientific evidence for sleeping after learning helping those learnt things being remembered.

Seems like reversing our daily schedules would benefit the economy and intelligence/work capability...or maybe not, let see.

Except on Friday when everyone turns up to work drunk. :lol:

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What you are suggesting is me becoming nocturnal for a week...I'm pretty sure doing that would be in violation of my 'body clock'. It would go against my circadian rhythm, which would probably have negative health effects. (I'm quite sure messing with the circadian rhythm causes jet lag, and may have other negative effects.)

 

My suggestion means keeping within the normal awake in the day, asleep during night cycle that humans have evolved with and naturally follow.

 

Except on Friday when everyone turns up to work drunk. :lol:

 

laugh.gif Maybe switch back to the current schedule for Friday.

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What you are suggesting is me becoming nocturnal for a week...I'm pretty sure doing that would be in violation of my 'body clock'. It would go against my circadian rhythm, which would probably have negative health effects. (I'm quite sure messing with the circadian rhythm causes jet lag, and may have other negative effects.)

People who work night shifts do it all the time.

 

My suggestion means keeping within the normal awake in the day, asleep during night cycle that humans have evolved with and naturally follow.

... and simply getting your entire school/work to change, which seems like a much harder task than changing your sleep time.

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Night Shift health consequences (by Wikipedia): The February 15, 2005 issue of American Family Physician noted that shift work has been associated with cluster headaches. Health problems in the short term can also include fatigue, stress and loss of concentration, a higher rate of absence from the job and poor sexual performance, as shown in the majority of 200 variable-shift workers in a recent study in Kuwait.

 

 

Long term consequences of disturbing natural circadian rhythms have been investigated also. A study by Knutsson et al. in 1986 found that shift workers who had worked in that method for 15 years or more were 300% more likely to develop ischemic heart disease.

 

The WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer listed "shiftwork that involves circadian disruption" as a probable carcinogen in 2007.

 

I wasn't planning on testing it.

Maybe you'd like to try it.

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Where did you get the idea of me actually trying to get this schedule implemented?

I was only suggesting it.

Seems like reversing our daily schedules would benefit the economy and intelligence/work capability...or maybe not, let see.

I took the phrase "let['s] see" to mean "let's test it" or "let's actually try to get this schedule implemented".

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What if the order of time we go to work/school and free time were reserved?

 

Work/School would be at the end of the day, rather than at the beginning.

Over-sleeping would cut into your own spare time rather than work/school time, so there would be little excuse for being late. Also, you'd go to sleep soon after you returned home from work/school, and sleep provides good stress relief. I'm pretty sure there is scientific evidence for sleeping after learning helping those learnt things being remembered.

Seems like reversing our daily schedules would benefit the economy and intelligence/work capability...or maybe not, let see.

 

As one who has worked the swing shift, it sucks. You go through the whole morning with the fact that you have to go to work later hanging over your head. By later in the day while you are supposed to be working, your body is starting to tell you that it is time to start winding down. You seldom can fall asleep right away after getting home, so you end up staying up another couple of hrs or so. Then, in order to get enough rest, you sleep in later, shortening the "free time" between awakening and leaving for work. Essentially you end up breaking your "free time" into two short segments instead of one long one.

 

I was so glad to get a day shift.

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Where did you get the idea of me actually trying to get this schedule implemented?

I was only suggesting it.

What did you expect from us? Of course we will try to find problems with your suggestion. That's what we do on this forum! :)

 

And unfortunately for this thread, finding the practical problems regarding the change in time is a lot easier than identifying the biological effects of working in the evening and relaxing in the morning/afternoon.

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I took the phrase "let['s] see" to mean "let's test it" or "let's actually try to get this schedule implemented".

 

I mean't lets see as in lets see if you can find problems with the suggestion.

 

What did you expect from us? Of course we will try to find problems with your suggestion.

 

That's exactly what I expected you to do.

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I mean't lets see as in lets see if you can find problems with the suggestion.

I think Janus provided some evidence that having work/school inevitably looming after your free time is a problem.

 

I think I showed you that changing your employer/school to suit your needs is a problem too. Everyone would have to change, and I think many jobs require sunlight, or are more efficiently done during daylight hours. I don't know, I'd have to think about that a little more. Economically, you'd spend more on lighting.

 

Personally, I like to get work done so I can feel better about my free time. There's something about finishing a job and then kicking back that's very satisfying.

 

Also, I find it easier to fall asleep after some down-time unwinding. Working and then the drive home after leaves me wired, like Janus mentioned.

 

It could very well be that school would be different from work. It might be good for students to sleep right after learning something. Then again, when the mind is racing after having learned something new and great, it might be hard to fall asleep.

 

I am SO disappointed that you're unwilling to test your hypothesis. It makes most of this just sheer conjecture. :( You could be sitting on the greatest idea EVER, but will you give it a week to experiment? Noooooooo. :P

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