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when does the universe end


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i have a quistion. when does the universe end? it cant stop, because there has to be something there. space is nothing but yet is something. its a paradox. we cannot feel space, yet we cannot see it or touch it. there is no gases in space. yet we know about it, and there is somehitng there. so if the universe goes on forever, there would be infinite items.s there would also be infinite space. one day, im gonna get in a spacship and keep going until i find out for myself. its bugging me, and my head hurts. someone help me and answer this

 

hmm.. no posts yet. im starting to get tired, bt i cant sleep with this on my head

 

going to sleep notify me if u post. *beep* good night

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My theory is that the universe will eventually expand to its' capacity and experiece a kind of opposite big bang, where the universe will be reduced, once again, to the size of a pea. So in theory, i guess that would mean the universe is only bound by time and not physical space, or maybe they are one in the same.

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I have a question. When does the universe end? It cant stop, because there has to be something there. Space is nothing but yet is something. Its a paradox. We cannot feel space, yet we cannot see it or touch it. There are no gases in space. yet we know about it, and there is something there. So if the universe goes on forever, there would be infinite items. There would also be infinite space. One day, I'm gonna get in a spaceship and keep going until I find out for myself. It's bugging me, and my head hurts. Someone help me and answer this.

 

hmm.. no posts yet. I'm starting to get tired, but I cant sleep with this on my head

 

going to sleep notify me if u post. *beep* good night

A reading of the below linked Wikipedia article might help to alleviate your headache and allow you to get some sleep:

 

http://en.wikipedia....of_the_universe

 

BTW - There are gases in space - they're just so rarefied that by our normal Earthly standards it seems to laymen like ourselves that there's "nothing there".

 

Chris

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Right now, we have no idea. We don't have enough information to answer this with an sort of precision. The only things we can say is that as far as we know, the universe has no specific observable boundary, and that if you go back in time the observable universe seems to take on a denser and hotter state.

Edited by questionposter
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A reading of the below linked Wikipedia article might help to alleviate your headache and allow you to get some sleep:

 

http://en.wikipedia....of_the_universe

 

BTW - There are gases in space - they're just so rarefied that by our normal Earthly standards it seems to laymen like ourselves that there's "nothing there".

 

Chris

 

From what I have read, for a "flat" universe with a cosmological constant -- as long as dark energy continues to exist in the same amount in the future (a big assumption since we don't know what it is -- the universe will eventually expand to the point where all but the closest galaxies will recede from us faster than the speed of light, making them impossible to see.

 

Then stars will eventualy run out of nuclear fuel and go dim. The universe will be filled with dead stars and cold planets.

 

Random collisons will eventually drive many stars to lower galactic orbits. As they circle black holes at the galactic center, they will give off stronger and stronger gravitational waves. Over time this loss in energy will drive stars closer and closer to black holes, to be eventually absorbed. Galaxies will then consist of enormous black holes surrounded by dead stars.

 

But there is hope (sort of). According to Stephen Hawking's theory, these black holes will eventually evaporate. In the final moments, they will become white holes "pumping new matter into the universe in unpredictable ways." So at least theoretically, our universe may continue to exist in some strange way.

 

But, as others have said, predictions on the future of the universe are very much a work in progress and highly speculative at best.

 

Quote: R. A. Freedman, W. J. Kaufmann III, Universe, 6th Edition, p. 661

 

Edited by IM Egdall
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We know that it was hotter and denser and now it is cooler and more thinned out and it is spreading apart faster than it was before, leading us to believe that a contraction is not likely since there is no known mechanism for it..

 

But since there's no observable boundary, any contraction we're seeing could be local in an even larger area of space than we know of, perhaps even infinite. Maybe even what we're seeing isn't the effect of a big bang, but of some other lesser shock waves, or properties of the fabric of space which still remain unknown. There's virtually no way to actually test any of it. The best thing we can do is measure from our relative position how other galaxies appear to be moving away from us, which as far as we can see in our current observable universe is relatively constant. Actually, it's not even necessarily that, it's just that the photons themselves get stretched out in wavelength as they travel great distances, the galaxies themselves are already doing something different by the time their light reaches us.

Edited by questionposter
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I read that wrong. Redo. There is only ideas of either expanding to max and returning to its original start of a small ball, or super massive black holes devouring everything. But with super massive black holes having feeding times and pauses inbetween it might not happen for millennias to come. I've something about the sun expanding to keep feeding on hydrogen, meaning that it eventually it engulfed everything and then reverses and implodes on itself. At its size I would imagine it create a black hole in its wake.

Edited by jorden
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  • 5 months later...

lets see space as a space time fabric. so this space time fabric has been expanding since the big bang. and we know that there will be a limit for everything. so after a limit, it will be not able to expand, and it will start to compress.

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There are various theories, some say the universe will expand so fast that the fabric of space rips to shreds, others say it will form the "bug crunch" and the expansion will go the opposite direction and eventually form a single singularity, and others say it doesn't have an end.

All of these would take probably millions of years to find out.

Edited by questionposter
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i have a quistion. when does the universe end? it cant stop, because there has to be something there. space is nothing but yet is something. its a paradox. we cannot feel space, yet we cannot see it or touch it. there is no gases in space. yet we know about it, and there is somehitng there. so if the universe goes on forever, there would be infinite items.s there would also be infinite space. one day, im gonna get in a spacship and keep going until i find out for myself. its bugging me, and my head hurts. someone help me and answer this

 

hmm.. no posts yet. im starting to get tired, bt i cant sleep with this on my head

 

going to sleep notify me if u post. *beep* good night

 

Before something can change, before something can act or be acted upon, it must exist.

 

This is a rather simple axiom, logically self-evident since any who might dissent must believe in things that don't exist. Existence in the absence of change is possible, change in the absence of existence is not. The fact that existence is required in order for change to occur explicitly means cause and effect is a function of (derived from) the phenomenon of existence, not the reverse.

 

Existence is not temporal in nature - it is not the result of cause and effect, so the cosmos had no beginning. Everything in the cosmos may constantly change, but that same everything has always existed in one form or another.

 

If the Universe is "everything that exists", and if, as some cosmologists predict, it is comprised of a finite amount of substance expanding into an unbounded volume, then the most popular cosmological model would certainly have suffered an entropy death an eternity ago. Even a cyclical Big Bang scenario wouldn't save a finite cosmos. If light is comprised of massless photons which could not be retrieved by the forces of gravity, then unless the Universe is entirely coated with a layer of black holes like a chocolate dipped ice cream cone, each "Big Crunch" would have been plagued by an energy leak that would have led to a much slower - but ultimately inevitable - entropy death conclusion.

 

The phenomenon of existence is explained by a principle, not a process or event.

Contemporary Science vs. Common Sense

Edited by THoR
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