Jump to content

Human Sleep Calculation


risiane
 Share

Recommended Posts

In human biology, the question "What determines how long we sleep?" has been asked, I've asked that question and have done experiments to show that the equation should be around this.

 

I am not taking in account of disturbances, just for your information.

 

Variables

X - PSR (Personal Sleep Rate)

S - ST (Sleep Timer \ Determined by how much energy you usually have when you wake)

U - EU (Energy Used \ Determined by how much energy you have used before going to sleep)

P - EP (Energy Preserved \ Determined by how much energy you haven't used before going to sleep)

B - BT (Bed Timer \ How long you usually sleep)

E = E (Energy \ Determined by the person)

A - S (Sleep \ How Long you sleep)

D - D (Differential \ The Inverted Value of B-X)

 

Let me explain the differential thing. Basically, we will start with 1 number, such as 8, multiply it, then determine how much the number changed, example, if 8 were changed to 6.5, it would have changed by 1.5. that would be the differential.

 

D = {B*(~X)}

A ~= (XE-P)-D

 

For example:

S = 16 Hrs

X = 0.82x

U = 13 Hrs

P = 3 Hrs

B = 8 Hrs

E = 16 Hrs

 

If this is all true then

A ~= (0.82*16-3)-1.56 = 8.56 Hours

 

You would sleep around 8.56 Hours.

 

I have not completely tested this theory though, that is why I posted it. What is your opinion?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

It might be better to take a statistical approach from a real world study rather than starting with a hypothetical equation and trying to make the results fit. You'd need to assess an enormous number of people for your experiment (and the results) to be credible. There would also be the issue of "too many variables" and inquantifiable factors, such as medications, stress levels, demographics, recent exercise, hydration, blood-sugar concentration, illnesses, head trauma, childhood factors, discomfort, noise, body temperature, ambient temperature, gender, age, normal sleep patterns, work patterns, smells in room, blood pressure, bladder capacitance.

 

Not that I'm trying to put you off. Go for it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In human biology, the question "What determines how long we sleep?" has been asked, I've asked that question and have done experiments to show that the equation should be around this.

 

I am not taking in account of disturbances, just for your information.

Can you show us these experiments? Can you show us the data and describe the design and controls? Has this been published? Is your hypothesis based on any existing established science, and is your experimental paradigm established by previous work or did you make it up?

 

I have not completely tested this theory though, that is why I posted it. What is your opinion?

We're talking about something empirical. How is anyone to supply a meaningful "opinion" if we can't see your findings and evaluate them in light of your design?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There might be seasonal variations in natural sleep duration.

 

After all, the natural reason for sleep must be, to stop us moving about at night. During the night, we can't see things properly in the dark. This might lead to harm - we might collide with unseen things, or get attacked and eaten by night-time predators. These bad events are forestalled by sleep, which makes us keep still at night.

And night lasts longer in winter, than in summer. So possibly, humans are adapted to sleep longer in winter.

 

I wonder, have you considered this as an additional factor in your sleep equation?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.