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Guest slp-no-iq

(E=mc^2) / 2 = ?

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Guest slp-no-iq

Is it possible to move matter at 1/2 the speed of light given earth's resources?

 

And if so, would it not create a 1/2 matter 1/2 engery occurance which's size and strength would be determined by the size of the matter moving?

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I dont really understand what you are trying to ask. If i understand correctly...the answer is no. The equation does not describe the speed at which the matter must go to convert to energy, but rather the conversion factor between matter and energy. 1/2mV^2 describes the energy an object has while moving,except this value is classical...i dont remember the relavtistic equation

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although i am not well read in physics, i do believe that e=mc^2 does not take into account velocity or acceleration so moving something at half of the speed of light would not do anything to its mass...

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Is it possible to move matter at 1/2 the speed of light given earth's resources?

 

Matter moves close to the speed of light all the time in particle accelerators. It would not be a problem, from a technical standpoint, to change that to c/2; the problem is just that there's no interesting science to be done under those conditions.

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Guest slp-no-iq
Matter moves close to the speed of light all the time in particle accelerators. It would not be a problem, from a technical standpoint, to change that to c/2; the problem is just that there's no interesting science to be done under those conditions.

 

Ok, I have no formal science education since high school but acording to the previous posting I apparently have a life long mis-intrupation of the basic formula e=mc^2

 

Does matter not convert to energy when it moves at the speed of light?

or does the formula say our defination of energy is that for a unit of measurement

and as a example a human moving his arm has 0.0000139 (something) of energy?

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When matter is moved to the speed of light, it does not become energy. You can' move matter at the speed of light anyway.

 

The moving arm thing... i havn't a clue what you are talking about.

 

E=mc^2 is conversion for matter to energy and vise versa. E is energy in Joules, m is mass in kg, and c is the speed of light, 3x10^8m/s. You put a mass into the equation, say, 1kg. You then multiply it by c squared to get 9x10^16J of energy from 1kg of mass. This is for rest mass, if the mass is moving, then it will just increase the mass by a tiny bit. I dont remember the full equation at this moment.

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Ok' date=' I have no formal science education since high school but acording to the previous posting I apparently have a life long mis-intrupation of the basic formula e=mc^2

 

Does matter not convert to energy when it moves at the speed of light?

or does the formula say our defination of energy is that for a unit of measurement

and as a example a human moving his arm has 0.0000139 (something) of energy?[/quote'] No no no. The equation says that if you managed to convert a given amount of mass into energy, the energy generated would equal the mass of the object times the speed of light squared.

 

edit: oops, tycho beat me.

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Does matter not convert to energy when it moves at the speed of light?

 

 

It's my first post......

I think:

E=mc^2 is the limit of the energy that m(I think it is the first mass).....can give.

E=m(v)v^2/2 is an energy that enhances with the speed.

When m(v)v^2/2 = mc^2 the speed can enhance anymore. :cool::mad:

.............................

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that equation seems redundant

 

when v=2 and m=1 for instance

 

(1)(2)(2)^2/2

 

so carried out you get

(1)(2)*4 / 2

8/2

E=4

 

take E=mv^2

same numbers

(1)(2)^2

(1)(4)

E=4

 

replace v with the speed of light

E=mc^2

 

you basicly came up with a more complex version of newton's formula for momentum

Momentum=1/2MV^2

except without the 1/2

 

 

for the rest of the thread

 

remember algebra you can find energy by E=mc^2 that means you can find mass by M=E/c^2

 

so when a particle is accelerated its energy increases and thus its mass increases

 

say you added 1 joul of energy (in this case via velocity velocity) to 1 joul of mass you then have double the mass. you could confirm this by finding 1 joule of antimatter and having the two blocks of mass collide and annihalate. you would get three joules of energy contained in photons

 

I believe that you can only find the energy of a single particle at a certain velocity. as in a more complex object such as a block of metal you have to factor in temperature which you would just add on to the equation for the mass

 

such as

 

E=MC^2+joules of heat

just a guess however

 

the problem with calculating the energy of say a car moving at 60mph is that you would need to figure out the equivalent energy of a particle moving at 60mph (to find the heat) then multiply the mass of the car by that energy to get energy from speed and then +energy from temperature

 

so I don't have enough information to right that equation

(I'm still just learning this stuff)

 

however with a particle like say an electron in a particle accelerator everything is done in electron volts

1 ev= some decimal of joules

1ev= the energy gained by an electron falling through an electrostatic field of 1 volt

 

mass of electron is equal to 511 ev

 

so if you accelerate it by 10kev your total energy is 10511 ev

 

so our equation for net energy is E=mc^2+joules of heat

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mass of electron is equal to 511 ev

 

511 keV/c2

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[math]0.510998918 \pm 0.000000044 {\rm ~MeV}/c^2[/math]

 

;)

 

(Yeah I know.... I'm a physics geek boy....)

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my mistake I meant to say 511kev however the /c^2 is superfluous in the measurement because whenever You say the energy, someone could just figure out the mass of it.

 

especially when someone says the mass of something in ev you can just assume the /c^2

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[math]0.510998918 \pm 0.000000044 {\rm ~MeV}/c^2[/math]

 

;)

 

(Yeah I know.... I'm a physics geek boy....)

 

But .511 is close enough for government work. :)

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