Jump to content

Anime and amino groups


livingdeadbeat
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi forum,

 

I have ,probably, a very simple question for you lot to answer but i can't find an explanation i understand well enough on the net.

 

I've just started biology at college and i'm writing about amino acids. Through research in my "Life" book i see that they have two functional groups, one being animo.

 

Then looking online i see lots of sites talking about amines, which seem to also be NH with the no of H dependant on if they are primary or secondary etc. ?

 

I'm confused with the difference between amines and amino groups. Could someone please explain this to me.

 

Thanks alot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As defined by wikipedia, "Anime is commonly defined as animation originating in Japan." Anime generally utilizes a specific style of drawing, which is poked fun at in this bit of internet pop culture: http://www.homestarrunner.com/sbemail57.html. Many examples of actual anime cartoons with which to satisfy your curiosity are available online, through a simple google search. :P

 

An amine refers to some derivative of ammonia and takes into account the entire structure. For example, it would be possible to call the amino acid glycine "carboxymethylamine." You treat the basic structure of the molecule as being an ammonia derivative and list the "added" carboxymethyl substituent.

 

When speaking of a part of a molecule (referred to as a moiety), the term amino is used instead. Using the same example, you could call glycine aminoacetic acid. When using this naming convention, the base structure is the acetic acid skeleton and the amino group is the "added" part.

 

This wikipedia excerpt should clear up up confusion: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Functional_group#Groups_containing_nitrogen

 

As for more examples, you could rename trimethylamine as N,N-dimethylaminomethane. Your confusion is largely just a nomenclature issue.

Edited by UC
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As defined by wikipedia, "Anime is commonly defined as animation originating in Japan." Anime generally utilizes a specific style of drawing, which is poked fun at in this bit of internet pop culture: http://www.homestarr...sbemail57.html. Many examples of actual anime cartoons with which to satisfy your curiosity are available online, through a simple google search. :P

 

An amine refers to some derivative of ammonia and takes into account the entire structure. For example, it would be possible to call the amino acid glycine "carboxymethylamine." You treat the basic structure of the molecule as being an ammonia derivative and list the "added" carboxymethyl substituent.

 

When speaking of a part of a molecule (referred to as a moiety), the term amino is used instead. Using the same example, you could call glycine aminoacetic acid. When using this naming convention, the base structure is the acetic acid skeleton and the amino group is the "added" part.

 

This wikipedia excerpt should clear up up confusion: http://en.wikipedia....aining_nitrogen

 

As for more examples, you could rename trimethylamine as N,N-dimethylaminomethane. Your confusion is largely just a nomenclature issue.

 

 

Ah all makes sense now! Thanks alot for taking the time to explain that.

 

Haha you wouldn't believe how many times i've typo'd amine through this assignment.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.