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qtrhorseluvr

how do i use agar solution?

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You need to be more specific. In general, you make a solution, heat it up, and pour it into a tube/plate.

Look on youtube for videos.

 

As a note, the stuff is temperature sensitive.

Edited by Genecks

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Hold on, first of all, what exactly is agar?

If it's any use to you, I know that agarose gel is used in gel electrophoresis (at least sometimes).

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Agar generally refers to the supplement to solidify culture media (as opposed to agarose for electrophoresis).

Edited by CharonY

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qtrhorseluvr, you want to use the agar solution for what ?

 

You probably will have a better picture reading up some articles at some websites, such as wikipedia, as you are looking for more complete information.

Generally agar agar is a product extracted from seaweed. We eat it sometimes as dessert, with much sugar added, so it isn't a healthy dessert, but if we don't add sugar, it taste bland. Recipes can be found over at some websites. These are more practical than the useless experiments we amateurs do with it. It is said to be found at supermarkets that sell asian products, not sure about Japanese or Korean ones, this is usually chinese or South east asian ingredients. There are also carrageenan and Konnyaku at some places, carrageenan could be from another type of seaweed, and that Konnyaku is from a type of plant tuber. All of these stuff make jelly, but there is slight differences. Gelatine also makes jelly but is from animal or fish. These products may or may not be suitable for some applications.

 

As I understand it, the agar is also used for culturing bacteria and growing plants with aseptic technique. The ones used for growing bacteria are specially made products, sometimes with other stuff added. There are several types for different applications. It is not found at supermarkets, but at Biomedical companies. I have not bought from them before, so I'm not sure about the details. Generally, we add the powder to water, which you can refer to the instructions to add how much, put in a pot and boil it until the water is boiling, after a short while, the agar will melt. You can pour into the petri dish or whatever jars or containers. When it cools down, it will solidify into a gel. Agar solution sounds strange...it is usually a gel, but if agar is use in lesser quantities, it does form a thick solution. I do not know what bacteria anyone will be culturing, but I think it may be dangerous, due to lack of knowledge in this field, so I wouldn't be doing any bacteria stuff. Those professionals do it at the labs, they know what they are doing.

 

Another application of agar is for producing plants in labs. Plant nutrients and agar added together. There are several types such as Murashige and Skoog medium. I think some products have agar added, some without. These products are found at Biomedical companies, those dealing with plants stuff. It is used for growing orchids and tissue culture of plants for mass production, such as bananas.

 

Maybe some years back, I was surfing some websites and came across someone DIY growing plants in flasks. I think that was cool, so I tried, and from my experience, I'm able to grow orchid seeds to seedlings about 2cm, after that they deteriorated, so more work needed, but it is possible to DIY. I do it with the grocery stores agar agar as the gel, and some other ingredients added. The techniques and recipes can be found at some websites, maybe google for it with words like "micropropagation" or "Kitchen tissue culture". but it is said that the commercial products of plant nutrient and agar are superior compared to DIY stuff. Tissue culture of plants is more complex, I can't do it yet, but maybe it is possible to DIY too. Need to beware of germs which often slips in the flask if not done properly.

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