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rail guns


dragonstar57
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I don't know much about them except what i learned from power labs but i know they use electromagnets to accelerate a projectile. and that because there is no "burn rate" in theory the projectile should be able to reach the speed of light. but as in any experiential technology there must be a problem that is preventing it from being perfected so what is this problem and what are some ways that this could be solved in the future

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I think the first application of rail guns will be to shoot stuff into low orbit. I cannot see military applications anywhere soon... for the reasons mentioned above: military applications need mobile electrical power, and the rails wear too quickly.

 

However, there is plenty of robust bulk material that needs to get into orbit (fuels, water, food, or mechanical parts for maintenance of ships up there)... if packed in the right way, all that can withstand massive G forces, so it can be launched in a simple shell. Cheap, efficient, fast.

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The navy is working on a rail gun atm.

 

 

This was filmed with an ultra-high speed camera. Remember a rail gun uses no explosive charge for propulsion, the flames following the projectile is air molecules that have turned into plasma from the friction between the bullet and the air caused by the extreme velocity.

 

Limitations are, as has been stated, power generation and durability of the rails.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The problems are thus:

1) They require huge amounts of electrical power, and so are unlikely to be of use in anything other than nuclear powered battleships or stationary defences.

2) The rails wear out too quickly.

 

I wasn't sure if the projectile had to make contact with the rails or not to fire. If the problem is that the rails wear out too quickly what about the possibility of using a coilgun?

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Hello:

Hi since long time ago, i haven't post here but I am back.

 

What about a combination: An explosive initial expulsion to overcame the intitial static inertia, then followed by the electromagnetic field applied, this could reduce the energy to move the projectile. One question are the rail guns bullets magnetized?

 

Marton

www.engitek.com

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  • 1 month later...

Hello:

Hi since long time ago, i haven't post here but I am back.

 

What about a combination: An explosive initial expulsion to overcame the intitial static inertia, then followed by the electromagnetic field applied, this could reduce the energy to move the projectile. One question are the rail guns bullets magnetized?

 

Marton

www.engitek.com

they already use pressurized gas for this purpose.

if they didn't the projectile would become "spot welded" to the barrel

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  • 3 months later...

"I think the first application of rail guns will be to shoot stuff into low orbit. I cannot see military applications anywhere soon... for the reasons mentioned above: military applications need mobile electrical power, and the rails wear too quickly.

 

However, there is plenty of robust bulk material that needs to get into orbit (fuels, water, food, or mechanical parts for maintenance of ships up there)... if packed in the right way, all that can withstand massive G forces, so it can be launched in a simple shell. Cheap, efficient, fast."

 

the US Navy just got a 32 Mega Joule rail gun to mount on a ship and to my knowledge they are looking for a cheap replacement for the Tomahawk cruse missile

Edited by marine10101
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