Jump to content

Egyption Religion - God Interpretation


Klaplunk
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hey,

 

1) Recently I've been doing a lot of research on Religion and previous civilizations - during my efforts I noticed reoccurences in the pyramid symbol. I was wondering if anyone here could help me decipher what religion the Egyptions followed. My first guess was 'Jewish'; this is purerly arbitrary as the pyramids came up whilst I was decoding what I believe the bible to represent.

 

2) Seeing as the religious books were written years ago, way before the advanced diction we have today, could we have misinterpreted the word 'God'? The definition of 'God' today is: the supernatural being conceived as the perfect and omnipotent and omniscient originator and ruler of the universe; the object of worship in monotheistic religions - I'm in no position to say this is incorrect; however, it could be.

 

I'll take a leap here by saying the first biblical texts may have been more scientific than spiritual. Although some of these civilizations lived without technology, they still were able to understand some of the concepts we've only recently found (Last 150 years or so); the solar system was discovered by the mayans - they were able to predict a galactic alignment without telescopes or space travel - the original Jews were able to understand Space/Matter/Time - and the egyptions also understood some of our solar system; all the while being bound to religion.

 

One thing all religions have in common is the word 'God', and the definition of 'God' - if we somehow got that definition wrong, then it changes everything. I believe in God, and I have done since the beginning of this year - I believe God to be an essence, a part of everything: the spark that created the big bang, the laws of the universe. Everything around me I believe is the essence of that initial 'spark' - that 'spark, to me, is God. Now that's not the definition of God, so technically it isn't God, but it's the God I believe in - 'the creator'.

 

What's everyones opinion on this? Crazy talk?

Edited by Klaplunk
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

One thing all religions have in common is the word 'God', and the definition of 'God' - if we somehow got that definition wrong, then it changes everything. I believe in God, and I have done since the beginning of this year - I believe God to be an essence, a part of everything: the spark that created the big bang, the laws of the universe. Everything around me I believe is the essence of that initial 'spark' - that 'spark, to me, is God. Now that's not the definition of God, so technically it isn't God, but it's the God I believe in - 'the creator'.

 

What's everyones opinion on this? Crazy talk?

 

 

All religions have the same definition of god? Ah... no... different sects of Christianity can hardly agree on that much less all religions....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Different religions do not have the same definition of "god" at all. Depending on context, the word can mean anything from a magical being not much different than a human, to abstract concepts like "infinity," "perfection," or "love." In some religions, "god" is not even a conscious being. There are many, many different uses of the word.

 

As for what religion the ancient Egyptians followed:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Egyptian_religion

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well that clears it up. However, the main religions all believe in a supernatural being, that's the "God" I'm talking about. You knew that anyway; so why not be wise and answer knowing that concept? Let's continue discussing of the word "God" I was on about.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You don't know that about the original religions. Especially the hebrew bible; it's translated and probably been edited over the years. You can't really believe that they put aside reality for a story, can you? Is that not just a litte disrespectful to our obviously intelligent predecessors? Surely you can say "Maybe" rather than "Unlikely" or "No" - that leaves room for you to decipher the books first, and examine the most primitive texts, before coming to an uneducated conclusion. It's like that code I came up with for the bible; it works - however, only by interpreting it in a differen't way. You say, "It's only because you interpret it like that", how do you know that isn't how it's meant to be interpreted? It's written so beautifully and it has a reoccuring pattern, therefore it should be studied more in this manner than just a 'story'.

 

Inb4 ignorant reply.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually not all religions even have a superior being. In Buddhism there are no deities, for instance. Taoism is another example though in practice often a variety of gods can be involved. Then polytheistic religions have a profoundly different view of what a god is compared to monotheistic ones, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You don't know that about the original religions. Especially the hebrew bible; it's translated and probably been edited over the years. You can't really believe that they put aside reality for a story, can you? Is that not just a litte disrespectful to our obviously intelligent predecessors? Surely you can say "Maybe" rather than "Unlikely" or "No" - that leaves room for you to decipher the books first, and examine the most primitive texts, before coming to an uneducated conclusion. It's like that code I came up with for the bible; it works - however, only by interpreting it in a differen't way. You say, "It's only because you interpret it like that", how do you know that isn't how it's meant to be interpreted? It's written so beautifully and it has a reoccuring pattern, therefore it should be studied more in this manner than just a 'story'.

 

Inb4 ignorant reply.

 

 

How is the Hebrew bible any better than tales of Thor the Thunder god? Were the Ancient Jews more intelligent than the Ancient Greeks? The Egyptians? How do you know how it was meant to be interpreted? Dune was beautifully written but i don't want to worship Sand Worms.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Again you've missed the point, purposely. I clearly explained what I meant.

 

1 First God made heaven & earth 2 The earth was without form and void, and darkness was upon the face of the deep; and the Spirit of God was moving over the face of the waters. 3 And God said, "Let there be light"; and there was light. 4 And God saw that the light was good; and God separated the light from the darkness. 5 God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, one day. 6 And God said, "Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters, and let it separate the waters from the waters." 7 And God made the firmament and separated the waters which were under the firmament from the waters which were above the firmament. And it was so. 8 And God called the firmament Heaven. And there was evening and there was morning, a second day. 9 And God said, "Let the waters under the heavens be gathered together into one place, and let the dry land appear." And it was so. 10 God called the dry land Earth, and the waters that were gathered together he called Seas. And God saw that it was good. 11 And God said, "Let the earth put forth vegetation, plants yielding seed, and fruit trees bearing fruit in which is their seed, each according to its kind, upon the earth." And it was so. 12 The earth brought forth vegetation, plants yielding seed according to their own kinds, and trees bearing fruit in which is their seed, each according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. 14 And God said, "Let there be lights in the firmament of the heavens to separate the day from the night; and let them be for signs and for seasons and for days and years, 15 and let them be lights in the firmament of the heavens to give light upon the earth." And it was so. 16 And God made the two great lights, the greater light to rule the day, and the lesser light to rule the night; he made the stars also. 17 And God set them in the firmament of the heavens to give light upon the earth, 18 to rule over the day and over the night, and to separate the light from the darkness. And God saw that it was good. 19 And there was evening and there was morning, a fourth day. 20 And God said, "Let the waters bring forth swarms of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the firmament of the heavens." 21 So God created the great sea monsters and every living creature that moves, with which the waters swarm, according to their kinds, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. 22 And God blessed them, saying, "Be fruitful and multiply and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth." 23 And there was evening and there was morning, a fifth day. 24 And God said, "Let the earth bring forth living creatures according to their kinds: cattle and creeping things and beasts of the earth according to their kinds." And it was so. 25 And God made the beasts of the earth according to their kinds and the cattle according to their kinds, and everything that creeps upon the ground according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. 26 Then God said, "Let us make man in our image, after our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps upon the earth." 27 So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them. 28 And God blessed them, and God said to them, "Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth and subdue it; and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the air and over every living thing that moves upon the earth." 29 And God said, "Behold, I have given you every plant yielding seed which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree with seed in its fruit; you shall have them for food. 30 And to every beast of the earth, and to every bird of the air, and to everything that creeps on the earth, everything that has the breath of life, I have given every green plant for food." And it was so. 31 And God saw everything that he had made, and behold, it was very good. And there was evening and there was morning, a sixth day.

 

At no point does it describe God as a supernatural being or a man in the clouds. This would be thee utmost primitive part of the bible - the one worth taking note of. A lot of great people have become facisinated with this book and much conspiracy has turned up over the last 100 years or so. Funny enough, anyone who tries to decpiher it as something other than a story is tagged as a 'fool' or scitzo.

 

tin-foil-hat.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One thing all religions have in common is the word 'God', and the definition of 'God' - if we somehow got that definition wrong, then it changes everything. I believe in God, and I have done since the beginning of this year - I believe God to be an essence, a part of everything: the spark that created the big bang, the laws of the universe. Everything around me I believe is the essence of that initial 'spark' - that 'spark, to me, is God. Now that's not the definition of God, so technically it isn't God, but it's the God I believe in - 'the creator'.

 

What's everyones opinion on this? Crazy talk?

 

Your view of God, which you reached independently, seems to be pantheistic. Well done for your independence but your offhand responses to other posts seems to suggest a certain arrogance, which is not often an attractive quality in people. I wonder if this is what you are referring to?

 

Pantheism is the view that the Universe (Nature) and God are identical.[1] Pantheists thus do not believe in a personal, anthropomorphic or creator god. The word derives from the Ancient Greek: πᾶν (pan) meaning "all" and θεός (theos) meaning "belief that God is all". As such, Pantheism promotes the idea that "God" is better understood as a way of relating reverentially to Nature and the Universe.[2] Although there are divergences within Pantheism, the central ideas found in almost all versions are the Cosmos as an all-encompassing unity and the "sacredness" of Nature.

wiki link

Edited by jimmydasaint
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Again you've missed the point, purposely. I clearly explained what I meant.

 

 

 

At no point does it describe God as a supernatural being or a man in the clouds. This would be thee utmost primitive part of the bible - the one worth taking note of. A lot of great people have become facisinated with this book and much conspiracy has turned up over the last 100 years or so. Funny enough, anyone who tries to decpiher it as something other than a story is tagged as a 'fool' or scitzo.

 

tin-foil-hat.jpg

 

I think you should know that this particular creation myth is not exclusive to the bible or even the first time it has been part of a religion. Some times it varies in details but so does the account in the bible, there being at least two different versions in the bible. I see no reason to believe that bronze age primitives had a better take on the universe than we currently do and I see no reason to think they were giants mentally or morally compared to us or any other culture, primitive or otherwise....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kaplunk.

 

You must keep in mind that you are drawing conclusions from one particular English translation of a Greek translation of a Hebrew text.

 

Do you really want to bet on the accuracy compared to the original?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.