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bloodhound

Should Russia declare an all out war on Chechen Rebels

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Blowing up planes constitues terrorism in my book. As does killing hostages but we are all entitled to an opinion. My post about a forum of discussion was intended to point out that their can be a diplomatic resolution to this and other crisees. That if there was a formalised platform in which ideas and suggestions could be voiced and genuinely considered' date=' people would feel less inclined to set up these violent rebel organisations in the first place. And the ones that are already in existance would find it difficult to maintain support if there is a realistic diplomatic approach being adopted that is embraced by the general public.

 

Sure it may not provide independence overnight but one of the main reasons Russia opposes Chechen independence is because a Chenchen government would starkly opposed the Kremlin on almost all issues as a matter of principle. [/quote']

 

The Chechen separatists formed the party in 1850. That's 150+ years of political talks, protests, discussions, books, leaflets and petitions. The separatist movement has outlasted the Czars, the emergence of Communism, two World Wars and the subsequent fall of communism. I think it's a bit naive to suggest they should have tried discussions. There is a point where diplomacy can be considered impossible.

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Diplomacy is never impossible. The level of validity and credit adhered to it by the International community is usually the mitigating factor in its success. I think it more naive to consider violence as bringing some form of resolution of the debarkle.

 

The pen is mightier than the sword.

 

Not a glib quote as much a recognition that diplomacy always has a place and that violence solves nothing other scratching the primitive itch of revenge. Perhaps Russia is overly stubborn, but is there any here who would in their right mind choose to argue that the blood of these children is somehow currency in international politics? That these inhuman acts bring Chechnya closer to independence?

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Diplomacy has set limits, it's unfortunate but true. Politics fail at the point when violence occurs:-

 

http://www.rediff.com/news/2002/jul/15iype.htm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/189058.stm

 

After the tragedy of the massacre in Beslan, diplomatic avenues have closed down. One could argue that they have effectively been closed for over 100 years, and this is the unavoidable result. Diplomacy is only an option where there is ground to give on either side. Where the sides are arguing one single point from opposing attitudes, then diplomacy can only sustain a status quo. The Russian activities in Chechnya have been vicious and uncompromising:-

 

http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/europe/9910/09/russia.chechnya.01/

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/3293441.stm

* Warning, Graphic Images * http://www.alkhilafah.info/massacres/chechnya/ * Warning, Graphic Images *

 

For a Muslim based country, the resorting to military activitys was the natural second course of action against Russia. The Muslims still have the jihad against the West, Russia itself has been a target for the militant factions since the 70's.

Russia has conducted itself far outside what the international community consider a justifiable response. They have, at the least, violated an international arms treaty. This in itself is not the action of a state willing to open diplomatic relations:-

 

http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/europe/9910/09/russia.chechnya.01/

 

I don't agree with the methods employed by either side. But I think that unles we understand why this happened, there is nothing stopping it happen again.

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My point exactly. Understand yields an avenue to resolving the crises. Violence helps people understand nothing of the reasons behind a cause. All too often people adopted the defeated approach and place such problems in the 'too hard' basket.

 

I am not so ignorant as to deny that violent acts will cease as a result of talks being undertaken but my intial and ongoing point is that without such a process there is no end in sight to the violence.

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Sorry if it seemed like I didn't know you meant a public forum, I knew what you meant Thales. I have a lot of trouble imagining extremists actually negotiating peacefully. Chechen rebels, Palestinian militants, they don't really want to negotiate. All they want is to complete their task, which is usually written in stone.

 

Chechens don't want to negotiate.

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Sorry if it seemed like I didn't know you meant a public forum' date=' I knew what you meant Thales. I have a lot of trouble imagining extremists actually negotiating peacefully. Chechen rebels, Palestinian militants, they don't really want to negotiate. All they want is to complete their task, which is usually written in stone.

 

Chechens don't want to negotiate.[/quote']

 

Sorry, what?

 

Your just going to lump all Chechens together, wipe clean 150 years of negotiations and pretend this situation was not avoidable? Is it really that simple, to choose demonising people rather than find out why they are doing what they do?

 

Do you even know where Chechnya is? Do you know what it's GNP is? Have you an idea how many civilians have been killed by Russian troops? Do you know how many teenagers are sold into slavery from that country? Do you have any idea at all? Does living in Boston give you a good perspective on Eastern Europe?

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