Jump to content

Science Channel Refuses To Dumb Down Science Any Further


Recommended Posts

From our friends at The Onion:

 

http://www.theonion.com/content/news/science_channel_refuses_to_dumb

 

"At this point, having the word 'how' in a show's title is about as close to scientific investigation as we get," Myers said. "In fact, I don't even know how we can justify airing a show like Mantracker at all. A cowboy hunts contestants down using his trailing skills? I guess you could say it makes the audience use 'observation' by watching what happens on screen."

 

"Observation is a part of science, right?" Myers added.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I am afraid that article was a little too close to the truth to be funny.

 

LOL,

Until the use of some foul words, I didn't notice that this was not the truth. I thought they were just quoting an actual employee who was talking off the record (and therefore honest).

 

This is what made me realize I was reading sarcasm: "Officials also noted that the cable channel greatly values the 18- to 45-year-old demographic of louts, clods, and empty-headed dumb ****s."

 

It's surprising that the BBC and some of the non-commercial Dutch channels have by far the best documentaries. It seems that advertisements must go hand in hand with stupidity.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Although really, I'm not completely opposed to a show called Really Big Things: I quite like actual show MegaStructures although that's because the human interest side sort of overrides the science and engineering parts - it's nice to be reminded that it takes people to build those 'Really Big' things.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Apparently they found out what the news channels knew for a while already. Narratives are more interesting to people than facts.

 

It depends how you present them. I agree that the narrator makes a huge difference. But the narrator can include loads of facts. You just shouldn't fire them at the audience like gunfire.

 

From my lectures at university, I conclude that you can definitely teach complicated topics in a very entertaining and interesting way. (And you can completely screw it up too).

 

Watch for example a BBC nature documentary... really wonderful and very interesting. Sir David Attenborough made absolutely stunning documentaries which are full of information.

 

The big difference is: those are hard to make. It's much, (MUCH!!) cheaper to place a film crew on a construction site than to try to film an endangered well-camouflaged bird in the rain forest.

 

I'm afraid it's money. 80% of the "science" shows are just film crews on construction sites or workshops, or at least just filming ordinary engineers doing their work (including all the social stuff and fights). They make no costs at all, except for the film crew.

Link to post
Share on other sites
From our friends at The Onion:

 

http://www.theonion.com/content/news/science_channel_refuses_to_dumb

 

"At this point, having the word 'how' in a show's title is about as close to scientific investigation as we get," Myers said. "In fact, I don't even know how we can justify airing a show like Mantracker at all. A cowboy hunts contestants down using his trailing skills? I guess you could say it makes the audience use 'observation' by watching what happens on screen."

 

"Observation is a part of science, right?" Myers added.

 

It is sad that such a ubiqutous and attended medium should be reduced to appealing to the lowest common denominator, instead of attempting to raise the bar.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What could possibly be so bad about the History Channel, Science Channel, etc. Before they used to have such boring and educational shows like Cosmos, and now they have such interesting programs like Barbecue Tech, Dirty Jobs, and the History of Moonshine!

 

 

Oh yeah, did I mention Two Weeks in Hell? All they do is talk about how people train in the military.

 

Who wants to guess at what else they could possibly think of? Next time on Discover Health, we are going to explore the physics of Lord of the Rings. And then on 2 p.m., on the History Channel, the first episode of Food Fight! will premier.

Edited by Tau Meson
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.