Jump to content

Destroying Diamonds


5614
 Share

Recommended Posts

You're kidding, right? I have a hard time wrapping my mind around the concept of burning a diamond. I mean, I'm no chemist, but hey...

Nope. Not kidding.

 

Yeah I don't think that Glider is right either (though I'm not sure). Isn't the melting point of diamonds near 4500 degrees Celsius?

 

Diamonds don't melt. They are carbon. They burn. Diamonds burn at 726.85 degrees Celsius , or 1,340.33 Farenheit (1000 degrees Kelvin).

 

See here http://philmintz.tripod.com/Chemistry/page5.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Theres no question of getting back weaker crystals on re-solidifacation, because all you will end up with in carbon dioxide, which will NOT condense back into a diamond :))

 

Diamonda are much harder to burn than coal, what confirms that they are carbon is the fact that they release carbon dioxide on burning.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Diamonds will occur in the phase diagram of carbon only and will occupy certain pressure - temperature regions. However that does not mean that they will meet any area of the phase diagram where a liquid exsists. In essence what I intended to ask was has liquid diamond ever been prepared ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Hmm, that's a good question. Since the carbon diamonds inside a diamond share their electrons with four other carbon atoms, does it keep the electrons in place so well that the diamond A) doesn't conduit electricity B) let's light through? I know A and B are true but I'm not sure why. :|

Link to comment
Share on other sites

NOVA (incase someone doesn't know) a National Public Television program show did a special on Diamonds. Here is a link with some good info on electricity and light waves with diamonds.

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/diamond/sparkle.html

 

Check out the link at the bottom of the page about "Diamonds in the sky" it is really interesting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, so the crystal structure causes the light to ricochet around and makes the diamond act as a prism. That's one effect you won't notice too much since diamonds are usually damn small (I have a greenish one that I bought for about 10€ that's almost too small to be seen without a magnifying glass :) ). But I (and pulkit) still don't have an explanation why some things are transparent/clear and some are not. :|

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just realized earlier post of mine was a waste. Now that I understand the question let me give it a try

 

The translucentness of a diamond is due to the fact that the crystaline structure allows light to pass through it. The photons have a little bit of absorbtion by impurities in the Diamonds and this is what makes some diamonds different colors. The impurities absorb the wavelength and thus are seen to be that color. The light can transmit through the diamond because "the available electrons in the material which could absorb the visible photons have no available energy levels above them in the range of the

quantum energies of visible photons." (Google Answers)

 

See if this helps, Sorry about the last post

Link to comment
Share on other sites

is it possible' date=' in any way, to destroy a diamond....

 

i know they are the hardest substance on earth, but is it possible....

 

e.g. put them next to a nuke! or in a black hole

 

ps. dont use another diamond![/quote']

Carbon boils at 4827° C, I suppose if you crank up the heat, you could vaporize it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Carbon boils at 4827° C, I suppose if you crank up the heat, you could vaporize it.

i once heard that someone nuked a desert somewhere and it turned some of the sand into glass.

(that might not be true, i cant remember where i heard it, but it sounds possible)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.