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what did i make?


jordehwa
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i have no idea what i made i was doing electrolysis an and a saltwater solution. light blue green color started forming in the solution what is this. i also noticed both electrodes were bubbeling the one bubbeling more im guessing is hydrogen and the one bubbeling less is chlorine

i also notice the one bubbeling less is dissolveing so whats in the solution please tell me thanks.

 

i also did this with one electrode copper and the other an aluminum pop tab the aluminum dissolved and the solution was grey and thick please tell me what happend.

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i have no idea what i made i was doing electrolysis an and a saltwater solution. light blue green color started forming in the solution what is this. i also noticed both electrodes were bubbeling the one bubbeling more im guessing is hydrogen and the one bubbeling less is chlorine

i also notice the one bubbeling less is dissolveing so whats in the solution please tell me thanks.

 

i also did this with one electrode copper and the other an aluminum pop tab the aluminum dissolved and the solution was grey and thick please tell me what happend.

 

REPLY: That light blue green is very typical of copper oxide. You did say one of the electrodes was copper. That is why many old buildings with copper roofs or ornaments containing copper become that blueish green. That`s my guess from what you have said. ...DS

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REPLY: That light blue green is very typical of copper oxide. You did say one of the electrodes was copper. That is why many old buildings with copper roofs or ornaments containing copper become that blueish green. That`s my guess from what you have said. ...DS

 

Actually, the green of copper roofs on old buildings is primarily a mix of copper carbonate and hydroxide, due to moisture and CO2 in the air, resulting in the characteristic green colour. Pure copper (II) oxide is black and insoluble. In terms of the colouration, the source of it is primarily copper ions, released by the electrodes. I recommend perhaps running the experiment for longer, and then bringing it to a halt, waiting to se what becomes of the solution as the water vaporizes. Usually (I've tried this one before, a fair number of times), one is left with a lot of leftover sodium chloride, a small quantity of greenish- bluish crystals (probably a smidge of copper chloride and hydroxide), and as well, a rather large quantity of dull orange copper powder.

 

In your second experiment, is the grey compound suspended in the solution, or dissolved, as I would probably guess it to be aluminum hydroxide.

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Actually, the green of copper roofs on old buildings is primarily a mix of copper carbonate and hydroxide, due to moisture and CO2 in the air, resulting in the characteristic green colour. Pure copper (II) oxide is black and insoluble. In terms of the colouration, the source of it is primarily copper ions, released by the electrodes. I recommend perhaps running the experiment for longer, and then bringing it to a halt, waiting to se what becomes of the solution as the water vaporizes. Usually (I've tried this one before, a fair number of times), one is left with a lot of leftover sodium chloride, a small quantity of greenish- bluish crystals (probably a smidge of copper chloride and hydroxide), and as well, a rather large quantity of dull orange copper powder.

 

In your second experiment, is the grey compound suspended in the solution, or dissolved, as I would probably guess it to be aluminum hydroxide.

 

REPLY: I appreciate your informative answer. Dr.Syntax

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