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naming chemicals - cyclohexane


maze123
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When naming chemicals, “an” stand for c-c bonds and “en” stands c=c double bonds. For example, Propene means 3 carbon atoms consisting of double bonds within the structure

 

Prop – 3 carbon atoms

en - double bond

 

I saw in an article, the following name with the structure –

 

cyclohexane : CH2 - CH2- CH2 -CH2 -CH2- CH2

 

“an” means no double bonds. Doesn’t the above structure have double bonds ? shouldn’t it be cyclohexene ?

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When naming chemicals, “an” stand for c-c bonds and “en” stands c=c double bonds. For example, Propene means 3 carbon atoms consisting of double bonds within the structure

 

Prop – 3 carbon atoms

en - double bond

 

I saw in an article, the following name with the structure –

 

cyclohexane : CH2 - CH2- CH2 -CH2 -CH2- CH2

 

“an” means no double bonds. Doesn’t the above structure have double bonds ? shouldn’t it be cyclohexene ?

 

First of all dont take that for granted, there are rules of nomenclautre which you must follow in order to name organic compounds. As for your question, the best thing will be to draw the strucuture and see if the structure is right with 'single' bonds? Here is the structure;

 

cyclohexane.gif

 

now from the stucture every carbon is tetravalent, so the formula is correct and the name is indeed cyclohexane.

 

For cycolhexene, there is one unsaturated bond present in the molecules , not 'Bonds' as you suggested. the sturucture is;

 

cyclohexene.GIF

 

the forumula of that would be ;

 

CH2-CH2-CH2-CH2-CH=CH

 

hope that helped!

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When naming chemicals, “an” stand for c-c bonds and “en” stands c=c double bonds. For example, Propene means 3 carbon atoms consisting of double bonds within the structure

 

Prop – 3 carbon atoms

en - double bond

 

I saw in an article, the following name with the structure –

 

cyclohexane : CH2 - CH2- CH2 -CH2 -CH2- CH2

 

“an” means no double bonds. Doesn’t the above structure have double bonds ? shouldn’t it be cyclohexene ?

 

welcome to the forum.

 

Chemsiddiqui has answered your query pretty much perfectly, i think. Another way to answer it would have been to google the name.

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