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Tesseract

Overclocking...

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Any info? :)

 

Care to be a little more specific?

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What m/b what cpu?

I had my XP1800 o/c but the m/b had a shitty so i dont do it anymore

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One more thing, overclocking can really do damage to your processor, so only do it if you have read a load about it. Overclocking leads to serious heating of the processor, and if it heats up to a certain amount, it can cause PERMANENT damage to the processor. A way to solve this is by finding a good way of cooling it, like a heat-sink. But, even with stuff like that, damage can be done!

 

Warning: ONLY overclock your processor if you REALLY need to do it for something really URGENT! I can't emphasize the possible damage that could be done to the system! :)

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in the chip manu business, if a chip is stated as being 30 mhz for instance, you can pretty much gaurantee it was designed as a batch that were to be 40mhz, it`s this error margin that`s exploited in overclocking, I`ve done it myself, I bought a 68040 30mhz and clocked her up to 40mhz, that was 6 years ago and it`s still working non stop 24/7 since then, however I know some (quite a few) that have destroyed their cpus trying it, it really is a game of chance! and heatsinking is essential!

but all chips are tested at higher frequencies before they leave the factory :)

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i wonder what ever happened to http://www.step-thermodynamics.com , but they used to make very impressive cooling systems for the cpu's, and they weren't too terribly expensive, but alas, that site no longer works, damnit:mad:

 

but with their stuff, overclocking cpu was not a problem.

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A way to solve this is by finding a good way of cooling it, like a heat-sink. But, even with stuff like that, damage can be done!

 

Well, you're gonna have to use a heat sink anyway tbh :P Another option for hardcore overclockers is watercooling, but it's a bit of a more expensive route.

 

But yes, even if you manage to overclock your CPU without melting it through the mb, you need to bear in mind that your OS's stability might not be as it was before (hanging a lot, crashes, random restarts, etc). And it invalidates any warantee you have on the computer, so I wouldn't try it unless you have a very old computer that you want to destroy or you like paying large bills for more computer parts :D

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I for sure dont want to ruin my processor, it cost lots of money.Nor my motherboard or video either. :)

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I wouldn't suggest you attempt to overclock your computer then.

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I wouldn't suggest you attempt to overclock your computer then.

Even if I wanted to I wouldnt know how... ;)

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well, the BIOS is a good place to start ;)

Well, that easy. :)

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..... increacing voltage will increase the hz (speed) and heat.. if you prevent heat you can theorically overclock it to a very very big hz rate.

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If anyone can get hold of some liquid nitrogen, you'll be impressed by your new processor speed :). I believe someone actually did try that, case the processor within a liquid nitrogen case and clocked it to an insane amount.

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Can't have been very stable though.

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What do you call stable?

 

dont freeze and stuff?

 

it´s stable till the water or (condensed air) falls in the mobo and cause shortcut.

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I mean when you're running an OS on it. Must've hard hardware errors all over the place.

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The 5.34 GHz machine was as stable as a standard PC. It was supercooled using liquid nitrogen I believe and constructed to avoid condensation causing a problem. I'll post some pics of it if I can find them.

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yes.... the one i saw had condensed air but still worked, that of the shortcircuit was mostly a joke. :P

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my amd athlon xp 2000+ is locked 6.25 * 199 :(, it has a lot more potential i think. and as good as i am a dont want to risk unlocking it.

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If you want a cheap experiment in overclocking, try a pentiumII 300MHz. With a relativly normal heatsink and a good fan, it was amazingly stable up to twice its speed.

 

You might also want to keep in mind that processors tend to develop a "memory" as far as what speed they are run at. If you overclock/underclock your processor for an extended period of time, it may only run at that speed.

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to overclock the computer on my system i have to move some jumpers on my motherboard and then go into the BIOS where theres a new setting [due to jumper chnages] from their i can overclock my computer.

 

using a liquid nitrogen cooling system, you can get 10GHz processors, it has been done.

 

over clocking you computer will not make it unstable, but could result in the computer working too hard and metling or otherwise being permamently damaged, its not worth doing it!

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You might also want to keep in mind that processors tend to develop a "memory" as far as what speed they are run at. If you overclock/underclock your processor for an extended period of time, it may only run at that speed.

 

 

rubbish, never heard of such a thing, i wont believe that until i am given very very solid proof of it.

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