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Looking for electrically conductive liquid...

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Hi.

A liquid crystal display has indium? transparent traces that make the electric contact to the circuitry and enter the glass sandwich to turn on the segments, and a couple of the traces seem interrupted.

 

Is there some simple easy-to-find liquid that I can apply with a (nail painting) brush to those traces to restore electrical path, and stay conductive after drying?

Does not need to be transparent, the available silver inks to do the work are more expensive than the item to be repaired, and I would use a 0.01% of the bottle. Not worth it.

 

Thanks,

Miguel.

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A possibility is a silver based thermal paste, you can get them from computery shops for heat sinks...

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There are conductive paints you can buy from any science equipment supplier, but as you said they are fairly expensive. Try looking for these from industrial suppliers (which may be cheaper); but without knowing for sure, I suspect these too will be too costly as you might have to buy a large quantity.

 

Another possibility would be to go to an autoparts store. They should have a small "patch" kit used to repair the rear window defroster(?) (not sure if this is the right name, its the copper wires on top of the glass where an electrical current flows to heat the glass so snow and ice melts away). Its actually a copper-filled paint. I have used these before they come in small bottles which should be suitable for what you describe. I can't remember the price as its been about 10 years, but I don't think they were all that expensive. I needed more than what was in these bottles but less than an industrial supplier. For my application, I wound up buying from an industrial supplier as I decided I'd rather buy once and have too much than possibly run out and have to go get some more.

Edited by SH3RL0CK

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Iv heard of electrical expoxy. I am not exactly sure how it works but if it dont have the grainyness that metallic paints do then that would be the best way to go I would think.

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