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what's a good programming language to learn?

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On 12/22/2015 at 3:43 PM, fiveworlds said:

 

Javascript is really hard to learn and rather poorly documented.

This is a good place to start learning JavaScript: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Learn/JavaScript/First_steps

If you're interested in documentation, here's a complete reference documentation: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference

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I have been trying to learn some programming language as well. I have heard about web development and this work has much more demand. I am going to learn PHP, MySQL, JQuery, Java and many more. What's your opinion in those programming langugae?

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On 7/24/2018 at 8:51 AM, Akshar99 said:

I have been trying to learn some programming language as well. I have heard about web development and this work has much more demand. I am going to learn PHP, MySQL, JQuery, Java and many more. What's your opinion in those programming langugae?

Web development is not really ordinary programming.  In web programming, the client is actually running the browser, such as Chrome or FireFox, and that is sending page requests to Apache Tomcat at a server, and the web developer has to compose html pages using css and other notational aids, to describe what the browser should render.
The main programming then is just JavaScript macros you send to the browser to modify mouse events and things like that.  You are really composing in developer languages instead of traditional programming.

But to do web development, PHP, MySQL, and JQuery are good.  JavaScript is more than just the JQuery library, so is also good.  But Java is not for web development.  It is more of an enterprise business programming language, except on Android devices.  JavaScript is not really related to Java at all.
Some people like JavaScript so much they also use it on the server side, with Node.js, but that is not the common convention.  

You can also use a framework that does most of the work for you, like Drupal, Wordpress, etc.  
If you do start with a framework, it pays to eventually understand what the framework is doing, so that you can hand tailor or modify as necessary later.
I don't consider frameworks to be really sufficient or flexible enough, but they are fast to get something up and running, and can be instructive.

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11 minutes ago, Rigby5 said:

But Java is not for web development. 

Really?

Quote

Java has strong support for web development. While Java on the desktop, with the notable exception of Eclipse RCP based application was never a huge success, Java is frequently used at the server side.

http://www.vogella.com/tutorials/JavaWebTerminology/article.html

 

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1 hour ago, Strange said:

No, Java is not frequently used.

There are large enterprise situations where they already have a team supporting Java, so they also want to do all their web development in Java, so some web development is done in Java, but not much.  In fact, most places I worked, like Intel, HP, and even parts of IBM, do not allow any Java installation.  They consider it a security risk and requiring too much memory.

A single person maintaining their own learning site should not get bogged down installing and maintaining Java, which would not at all help them learn programming or developing web sites.

From your own link is it obvious Java is a poor choice as it is more complex than necessary, compared to something simple like PHP.

{...

1.4. Java web or Java EE container

Java web applications are typically not running directly on the server. Java web applications are running inside a web container on the server.

The container provides a runtime environment for Java web applications. The container is for Java web applications what the JVM (Java Virtual Machine) is for local running Java applications. The container itself runs in the JVM.

In general, Java distinguishes two containers: the web container and the Java EE container. Typical web containers in the Java world are Tomcat or Jetty. A web container supports the execution of Java servlets and JavaServer Pages. A Java EE container supports additional functionality, for example, distribution of server load.

Most of the modern Java web frameworks are based on servlets. Popular Java web frameworks are GWT, JavaServer Faces, Struts and the Spring framework. These web frameworks usually require as a minimum container a web container.

...}

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1 minute ago, Rigby5 said:

No, Java is not frequently used.

Who said it was. 

2 minutes ago, Rigby5 said:

Popular Java web frameworks

Oh. Popular. So ... widely used?

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