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Inflammation


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I was already on to this before I had my surgery. I had this great nutritional website that would tell me how any food affected inflammation (practically half of all natural foods fall at least slightly under the inflammation radar). I was making lots of salad dressing with flax oil. I'm not exactly sure why I was getting inflamed, but I guess that is irrelevant.

 

Of course, now, I'm still recovering from this surgery and I'm much more sensitive. I was wondering. It's been about a month and a half and I've been reading a bit on inflammation. I've been eating good, though a bit calorie starved for the first couple of weeks out of the hospital. At this point, after digging into my neck vertebrae (removing the rear end of two vertebrae) and digging into the protective layer of the spinal cord, I am not sure if it will ever feel substantially better than it does now. Obviously, I still have these inflammation issues because I see the effects in my diet, sometimes quite dramatically. So the way I see it is either it has not fully healed yet or I have wound up with this condition that I have read about called chronic inflammation, or worse, a chronic wound, though it is arguable that I was already experiencing that to a lesser degree because of 10 years of chiropractic. I'm guessing that if I force myself to eat like a rabbit for a decent amount of time, than maybe it will help give myself a chance to completely heal. I'm on the run a lot, so I'm prone to cheat here and there at select cheat spots (least amount of preservatives), but I could do better. Can anyone give me some insight into what to expect and how to handle things better?

 

I guess the real question on my mind was why I kept getting so affected by these inflammation factors from the food, but had no serious injuries going on? Is it conceivable that the act of getting a chiropractic adjustment is good cause to stimulate an inflammatory response, likely causing chronic inflammation if it is done regularly? Why else would I have been so affected by this food? Why would people get affected by food if they were not already inflamed to some extent?

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  • 2 months later...

Oh man, the neck healed up just fine. Feel no need to go to chiropractors at all. Can't say that for the rest of my body. Besides injuring my shoulder in my sleep, I already had a muscle that is mostly shot from stupid chiropractic students, stupider massage therapists, and stupidest me, though at least I had an excuse in not getting any relief. Managing it all has been challenging, but everything is getting better gradually. There just is not much literature around the internet about how to manage scarred, fibrotic muscle. My bodybuilding career is pretty much over until they figure out how to graft muscle tissue .

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It's not a matter of opinion. Check it out. http://www.nutritiondata.com

All kinds of foods, natural healthy foods, contribute to inflammation. To healthy people, it does not pose much of an issue, but to those who have any degrees of inflammation going on, it only complicates things, making things worse than they would be, even after eating healthily, to boot.

 

Apples, bananas, corn, orange juice, chicken. Who would have ever thought that foods like these would contribute to inflammation, yet I can confirm it through personal experience. This is like a whole new facet that hospital nutritionists have never even taken into consideration. Just show me the door and I'll stick with my omega 3's, thank you very much.

 

Plus, after I injured my shoulder, I developed a shortened muscle in my latissimus/teres major - not fun at all trying to stretch that out and get my shoulder joint to heal at the same time. It's too long and complicated of a story for me to want to get into. This thread is about inflammation, in general.

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Au contrare. Somehow the sugars contribute to inflammation, though a fruit may contain other components which offset the effects of the sugar and make it anti-inflammatory.

 

IF (Inflammation Factor) Rating™ for Apples, raw, with skin [includes USDA commodity food A343]

For 1 cup, quartered or chopped (125g)

mildly inflammatory

-25 IF Rating

 

IF Negatives

This food contains carbohydrates, which may increase blood sugar levels.

The IF Rating™ provides an estimation of this food's effect on inflammation.

 

IF (Inflammation Factor) Rating™ for Pineapple, raw, all varieties

For 1 cup, chunks (165g)

mildly anti-inflammatory

59 IF Rating

 

IF Positives

This food contains known anti-inflammatory nutrients, including Vitamin C.

 

IF Negatives

This food contains carbohydrates, which may increase blood sugar levels.

The IF Rating™ provides an estimation of this food's effect on inflammation.

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