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I was wondering if anyone could recommend a/some good books(s) to get me started on quantum physics, relativity and string theory. Preferable a book that I can just read rather than a study text book.

 

I also wanted to ask whether any of you have read the book "Imagining the Tenth Dimension", and whether or not it was good, because I plan on reading it some time soon...

 

Thanks,

Innit

 

Sorry 'bout the double post, but here's a book that I found, which looks quite interesting:

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Elegant-Universe-Superstrings-Dimensions-Ultimate/dp/009928992X/

 

Any ideas?

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I've not read the elegant universe or Imagining the Tenth Dimension so can't really comment on them...

 

But a question I think many would like to know before recommending books is, what level of education have you already had?

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I've not read the elegant universe or Imagining the Tenth Dimension so can't really comment on them...

 

But a question I think many would like to know before recommending books is, what level of education have you already had?

 

Good question indeed. I'm currently a student at school (completing my last years), and I'm around that level, however, I am trying to advance ahead of that level because it's a little too simple for my liking at the moment., and I would therefore like to learn in more detail, on my own...

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Good question indeed. I'm currently a student at school (completing my last years), and I'm around that level, however, I am trying to advance ahead of that level because it's a little too simple for my liking at the moment., and I would therefore like to learn in more detail, on my own...

 

See bold. Pop science will certainly not make you 'learn in more detail', if that's what you want to do. Hunt around for old text books, and look up and ask questions on problems you come across.

 

I'm taking a break between courses, I could read Bohm, Smolin or Greene, but I've decided to read / study 'Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences' 2nd edition, which is a good bridge between what I've studied over the last two years and my next course.

 

The point of pop science or any layman book, is that it's accessible, and lacking detail. If you're really serious about learning in more detail, start with an introductory book...Griffiths springs to mind, and get some applied math text books, so you can cross reference.

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See bold. Pop science will certainly not make you 'learn in more detail', if that's what you want to do. Hunt around for old text books, and look up and ask questions on problems you come across.

 

I'm taking a break between courses, I could read Bohm, Smolin or Greene, but I've decided to read / study 'Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences' 2nd edition, which is a good bridge between what I've studied over the last two years and my next course.

 

The point of pop science or any layman book, is that it's accessible, and lacking detail. If you're really serious about learning in more detail, start with an introductory book...Griffiths springs to mind, and get some applied math text books, so you can cross reference.

 

Sorry about the confusion, but when I said "on my own", I didn't mean to say that I would try to learn everything without anyone else's help. I meant to say that I wanted a book that would help me work individually, but I would ask occasional questions when I felt it necessary. I would like to learn it "properly", not as "pop science" (although I might have a go at the layman books just for more casual reading), but also won't have loads of time to study these books, seeing as I've got school work to tackle.

 

By the way, I'm a high school student, for those who asked.

 

Thanks

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  • 6 months later...
I'd say good rhetoric.

 

Now what do you mean by that?

I wasn't exaggerating, it was a very good book...

 

As I'm learning now, though, Fabric of the Cosmos is slightly better, mostly because Mr. Greene goes more in-depth on the ideas and discoveries mentioned in The Elegant Universe.

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