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Kedas

Water forms floating 'bridge' when exposed to high voltage

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HT electrophoresis, just doing something else basically :)

 

I did something similar when I was about 12, but on a smaller scale, roughly about the same time I discovered that candle flames conduct electricity also :)

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HT electrophoresis, just doing something else basically :)

 

I did something similar when I was about 12, but on a smaller scale, roughly about the same time I discovered that candle flames conduct electricity also :)

 

Well, now I've got to play with fire and electricity. Can I blame you if I burn the house down? Should I use high voltage static electricity, or lower voltage current with the flame?

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I used a Microwave transformer (circa 1977) and the associated rectifier parts for the DC part of the experiment, and then used those little plastic observation cube blocks that you get with the Sea Monkey kits with plain water in side-by-side cells, the water moved over from one to the other.

well, it more or less "Jumped" over in a series of controlled spurts, slow to start then Plop, it would jump over and start again.

 

as I said, it`s a HT version of electrophoresis, and air is a reasonable medium at the correct voltage.

 

think, how does factory Paint spraying work on a 3D object?

they simply Charge the target and the paint spray!

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That doesn't help much. Could you write the procedure in an organized form? I realize it's has do with the polarity of water, but some other issues I want to look.

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that`s basically all remember about it considering it was about 30 years ago that I did it!

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From the page:

The bridge forms due to electrostatic charges on the surface of the water. The electric field then concentrates inside the water, arranging the water molecules to form a highly ordered microstructure. This microstructure remains stable, keeping the bridge intact.

 

How high the static voltage has to be or how pure the water has to be is not mentioned, but they do say that dust is probably a reason that makes it unstable

It's like liquid ice.

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How long can you make the bridge?

 

Is the bridge stationary?

 

Do you have to start the bridge through a physical method?

 

Elaberate (hope that's how you speel it).

 

This could be an interesting thread.

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threads merged... there's no point in having two.

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What the bridge implies, is that the bonding forces between the water molecules have gotten stronger, or else the bridge would act like liquid water and collapse. This implies the hydrogen bonds between the water molecules have gotten stronger and are approaching a state that is closer to ice, instead of normal liquid water. It is not ice, but a bonding state between liquid and solid water. When water freezes into ice, it expands. The rising of the bridge is an expansion affect out of the shielding of the beaker, into the air where the affect can get the full field potential. The full field potential allows the water energy to reach its lowest value, i.e.. reflected by the strong bonds.

 

If you look at a single water molecule, the oxygen holds the electrons very tightly due to its high electronegativity. This makes the hydrogen slightly positive. Although the oxygen is slightly negative, it can easily hold this extra negative charge since it helps stabilize the orbitals of the oxygen, i.e., octet stability of the oxygen. The oxygen end is relatively inert. The hydrogen end carries the net burden of the potential.

 

In liquid water, the hydrogen will try to lower its potential with hydrogen bonds. But in liquid water, there is enough thermal energy for the oxygen to twist to avoid the hydrogen getting the full amount of electron density it needs to fully lower its potential. The hydrogen ends up with residual potential. In ice, the coldness slows the oxygen down, so they can't avoid the hydrogen any longer, allowing the hydrogen to share easier. But the oxygen still tries to assert its higher affinity for electrons, and pushes the H away, i.e., ice expands. If the hydrogen can't be avoided, it going to share the electrons, out in the boonies.

 

The electric field goes right after the O, causing it to break its strangle hold on the electrons. It essentially lowers the affective electronegativity of the oxygen. This makes it harder to avoid the hydrogen at room temperature, since the electrons are sort of slightly ionized by the field. The result are hydrogen bonds get closer to ice. It is not ice, since at that temperature, the oxygen is still trying to thermally twist, but its electrons are now much fluffier, making them an easier target for the hydrogen.

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