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Would you ever consider having your pet cloned?


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Would you ever consider having your pet cloned?  

1 member has voted

  1. 1. Would you ever consider having your pet cloned?

    • Yes
      18
    • No
      44


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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...
  • 4 months later...

Oh certainly. I don't have enuff frickin cat hair on everything, so I am going to clone my wife's pathetic cat so it can be recloned forever. Tons of cat hair, clogging my computer, on my chair, on my tvs. The maid can't get it all..it just keeps comming. How can a 14 pound cat produce 2.1 metric tonnes of cat hair evey year??

 

ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

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A pet is a pet, you take care of it and you have the illusion that it cares about you (which it does, because you feed it).

I picked no because there is no reason to pick yes. It would be the same kind of cat but the deciding factor of what any mamal will be like is the way it is raised.

Enless ofcoarse you just like the hair colour pattern on it.

 

Bill, I suggect you go for a less hairy cat next time.

 

Ide try to get a naked mole rat as a pet! The ultimate exotic mamalian pet.

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  • 10 months later...

YES! the 1`st one was SOooo tasty :)

 

 

seriously though, when it comes to over priced foods made of endangered species or limited areas in which they breed, why not!?

I for one like Aberdean Angus beef, it`s probably one of the best beef meats ever, but it`s too expensive, I say make clones! :)

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  • 2 months later...

I picked yes. I currently have 2 dogs, 13 years old so the end is creeping ever closer. They were both hit by a car when they were younger, one recoverd fine. The other never healed right, but could still use the leg that was broken. Of course, since it was never the same she became lazy and fat. I could really do nothing, because both were with my grandmothers for the past 5 or 6 years and she lived to far to go down every/every other day to walk them.

 

Recently, shes had 2 strokes from going up and down the stairs. Some kind of kidney infection. Fell down the back stairs, broke her other leg and maybe even one of her front ones. She still gets arround. Is deaf and probably half blind. But she has a will like no other, I just feel bad that her last few years were so bad:( I just wish I could have her over again, but only from the time we had her. of course, diffrent environment, diffrend up-bringing would result in a diffrent dog:(

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seriously though' date=' when it comes to over priced foods made of endangered species or limited areas in which they breed, why not!?

I for one like Aberdean Angus beef, it`s probably one of the best beef meats ever, but it`s too expensive, I say make clones! :)[/quote']

 

Trouble is that we really don't know what we're doing yet when it comes to cloning animals. You could be eating something that may be harmful to you because it's gone through a process of mutation due to the cloning that nobody knows about. When cloning of animals is perfected, I'd say this would be a very good idea though.

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  • 3 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...

My pet hamster only cost $8. If I were to purchase a clone, I'm sure it would cost in the thousands of dollars. So no way.

 

They say you can't put a price on life, but I just did.

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whilsts it would cost too much to clone your pet, i say YES

 

cloning is NOT wrong, i think!

 

it only has uses and ADvantages from my point of view!

 

if the clones are identical in every way, then good, you only cloned it because you like it, and if they turn out different, then it will be like having two different pets, just like buying a new one, so who cares! so long as you like pets!

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  • 9 months later...

I wouldn't. It really wouldn't be the same dog. It sounds like a big scam playing on people emotions.

 

An interesting fact I just remembered. There have been no dogs cloned yet. For some reason dogs seem extreemly hard to clone. Much harder then humans, aparently we're not all that hard. (Going off the reproductive cloning we've done so far of course) Or at least that's what my embryology proffs told me last november.

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If I thought the technology would have provided me with a sufficiently similar dog I would have loved to have cloned the black German Shepherd I had in my twenties. He was almost perfect as to temperament and intelligence. I tried to reproduce him via the usual route of puppies and it just didn't work.

 

Some critters are one of a kind. The great racing thoroughbred and Triple Crown winner Secretariat never produced offspring that were near his equal.

 

IMO, with well bred purebred dogs and cats, the temperament is so much a part of the genetics that an adequate environment would result in cloning producing pretty much the same animal. And leaving aside show qualities, temperament is what makes a satisfying or dissatisfying pet to owners.

 

That is why people should never buy from puppy mills (where most pet stores get their stock) because breed temperament will then be unpredictable. But even among the breeds (bred by responsible breeders) there is variability.

 

There are GSDs suitable for police work, protection work, search and rescue, obedience trials, and even some herding, in addition to the more sanguine temperament needed for pets. Breeding is trial and error to some extent.

 

But I wonder, perfected cloning would certainly take much of the chance element out of pet owning and maybe take some of the fun and adventure out of it, but hundreds of thousands of dogs die every month in "shelters" because they were a bad match for their owners - or vice versa.

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my dog, a lab and other breed mixed. She was almost 17 years old, so at least she lived a long, happy life.

 

If she lived to be nearly 17, she must have been very well cared for. I suspect at life's end most of us would hope that we were well loved. :)

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