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ender7x77

Ionic Equations

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So, I'm in grade 12 chemistry and I am not sure how to do chemical equations. This may seem strange to some, but it is due to not having any prerequisites in chemistry as I have decided I wanted to take it after discovering my affinity for science through Biology. With that said, I am at a great disadvantage and the course is looking very bleak at the moment. Anyways, I understand how to balance equations, but it is obtaining the equation that is difficult for me. Once, I am able to create one I should be able to do everything else. Anyways, here's what I got:

 

Distilled water and Potassium Hydroxide

Ionic Equation: H2O(l) + 2KOH(s) → 2H20 + K20

Full Ionic Equation: 2H+ + O2- + 2K+ + 2OH- → 2H+ + O2- + 2K+ + O2-

Net Ionic: 2OH- → O2-

Thermochemical: H2O(l) + 2KOH(s) → 2H20 + K20 +Heat, ΔH= (±) #

 

Hydrochloric Acid and Potassium Hydroxide

Ionic Equation: HCl(l) + KOH(s) → H2O + KCl

Full Ionic Equation: H+ + Cl- + K+ + OH- → 2H+ + O2- + K+ + Cl-

Net Ionic: OH- → O2-

Thermochemical: HCl(l) + KOH(s) → H2O + KCl + Heat, ΔH= (±) #

 

The first one I think is completely wrong, but I thought I'd post it anyways. If anyone could point out my mistakes I would greatly appreciate, and most likely learn from my errors. Thanks.

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KOH and H2O will not react to form K2O in fact the inverse is true: K2O+H2O->2KOH.

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So, if that is not the product then what is it when mixing distilled water and potassium hydroxide? And judging my your lack of a comment regarding the second equation, I am assuming it was correct.

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There is no reaction you get a solution. Just like NaCl doesn’t react with water;insted you just get salt water in this case its lye water. In both reactions you'll do better to think of h2o as hydrogen hydroxide makeing it h+ + oh-

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KOH and H2O will not react to form K2O in fact the inverse is true: K2O+H2O->2KOH.
Can I not just flip this then? I apologize for my inanity, but the whole concept of this is evidently above me. Why can't KOH and H2O be my reactants? I specifically added the KOH to the H2O, which produced gas; thus supporting for what I know as a chemical properity.

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The gas was most likely steam. KOH+H2O wil not work because K2O is much more basic then KOH remember that reactions are “trying” to get the ph as close to 7(neutral) as possible.

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Thanks for the help so far. I'm not trying to disagree with you, but there has to be some sort equation for it.

 

Also, can you confirm whether or not my second attempt was correct. I'm not grasping this one, but perhaps I'll understand better on this one.

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I suppose I’m not a very good explainer

See

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solution

Solutions are really quit basic things perhaps you should read up on your chem seeing as you didn’t take the prerequisites

As for the seconded one in the full ionic try thinking of water as hydrogen hydroxide it will really simplify things. Only in very rare cases will H2O act as hydrogen oxide. Look at it this way if you drop a chunk of sodium into water you get sodium hydroxide not sodium oxide. Or try thinking of it this way H2O is formed by the reaction of a base(defined as a hydroxide donor) and an acid (defined as a proton donor) react H3O+ + OH- => 2H2O thus the basis of acid base theory. Oh bother I try to explain water and I get into acid base theory .

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Hmmm...well, I made some corrections. I stayed with the first one because it is the only thing that makes sense to me until I conference with my teacher, but if you look at the net of it, it seems somewhat correct (now, that I know how to do the net). Here is what I got for the two:

 

Distilled water and Potassium Hydroxide

Ionic Equation: H2O(l) + 2KOH(s) → 2H20(l) + K20(s)

Full Ionic Equation: 2H+ + O2- + 2K+ + 2OH- → 2H20+ 2K+ + O2-

Net Ionic Equation: 2H+ + 2OH- → 2H20

Thermochemical : H2O(l) + 2KOH(s) → 2H20 + K20+Heat,ΔH=(±)#

 

Hydrochloric Acid and Potassium Hydroxide

Ionic Equation: HCl(aq)+ KOH(aq) → H2O(l) + KCl(s)

Full Ionic Equation: H+ + Cl- + K+ + OH- → H2O-(l) + K+ + Cl-

Net Ionic Equation:H+(aq) + OH-(aq) → H2O-(l)

Thermochemical: HCl(l) + KOH(s) → H2O + KCl + Heat, ΔH=(±)#

 

I hope this is right...

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The seconded one is right:-) . Except it wouldn’t be h2o- just h20 h- + oh+ is a balanced charge I think its just a mistake of overlooking. I hope your teacher will be able to explain to you that not every thing reacts. You can put salt in water and you have salt water there is no reaction. The same thing happens when you add KOH to water.

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Thanks bob... My teacher did it on the board for the class and you were right about it being an hydrolysis reaction. This is what it is KOH -(H2O)> K + OH

The only thing i need is the net of it, which I cant see it changing. Thanks for your help.

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