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Guest moonchild1980

Cold Fusion question

Do you believe cold fusion is real?  

1 member has voted

  1. 1. Do you believe cold fusion is real?

    • Yes
      5
    • No
      7
    • Maybe in 10 years
      0
    • Maybe in 20 years
      2
    • Undecided
      7


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Guest moonchild1980

Do you believe cold fusion can really be achieved or is it just a case of high hopes? I know a few have tried to prove it and now have given up.

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No, i quite doubt this is possible the convention of cold fusion is that under certain conditions like fusion atoms/molecules will release large amounts of energy, the paradox i see with this is the substance is supposed to remain cold for the process to be self sustaining but with high scale exothermic reaction, the substance can no longer remain cold so i dont believe this can ever be achieved,no with convential understanding and not in the world as we know it tim

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wasnt there two guys that claimed they had acheived cold fusion, but they were later exposed as a hoax.

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In the early 90s two researches claimed they had observed a fusion reaction that emitted energy but occured at room temperature. There results were not valididated by others who performed the experiment, so nobody gave it much credence.

 

Cold is a relative term remember. Fusion normally requires tens of millions of degrees and a huge amount of pressure to occur. They didn't say it would not heat up, it has to if heat is created, but it certainly would be be around the millions of degrees normally required. Also, the exeriment was not large scale. They had only a small amount of reactants, and they observed a few neutrons. This amount of energy would not heat much of anything even if it did exist.

 

It may not be entirely incorrect though. While nobody has been able to come to the same conclusions the original two researches did, when performing similar experiments more neutrons are produced then can be normally accounted for. This odd result has prompted many to continue research in the area, although they are often ridiculed as crackpots. They even hold an annual conference if I am not mistaken.

 

Maybe possible. It would be nice.

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didn't they just use pallidium electrodes for electrolysis of water?

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well, I really dont know if cold fusion is real. It could be real, and it could be fake. It's not as if it will be real in 10/20 years from now if it isnt now. so I would vote "maybe", because I really want to believe it's real, but no one seems to want to prove that to me :)

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didn't they just use pallidium electrodes for electrolysis of water?

 

I dont know how they did it, you could easily look this up on google if you are curious.

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I'd like to think cold fusion were a real possibility, but I suspect not. I have just run across this information that tends to support those who believe anyone who seriously believes in cold fusion is a couple of electrons short of a filled orbital.

 

http://www.iccf11.org/

 

The 11th ICCF (that's The International Conference on Condensed Nuclear Matter) will be held from the 31st of October in Marseilles.

 

Marseilles! You hold a conference in the south of France and you site it in Marseilles? icon13.gifIt does raise questions!icon5.gif

 

On a more serious note their keynote speaker is Brian Josephson (Nobel prize. Josephson junctions. even I've heard of them) who believes there may be something in it, so maybe.

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Do you believe cold fusion can really be achieved or is it just a case of high hopes? I know a few have tried to prove it and now have given up.

 

 

Maybe it's a only microscopic..fission-fusion nuclear reaction because are always required elements with an high density...........

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Later this month, the U.S. Department of Energy will receive a report from a panel of experts on the prospects for cold fusion...

Don't steal material from other web sites and pass it off as your own.

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one question however is that if cold fusion occurs at room temperature because of hydrogen molecules becoming closer on one side of the experiment. then how come nasa doensn't see this when they super cool hydrogen for use as fuels

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The aim of cold fusion is to get fusion happening at or near room temperature - that does not mean "the colder the better".

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I know, but my understanding of the phenomena is that when the current is provided in between the two electrodes the deuterium as it is sepperated gathers at one of the electrodes and becomes more dense after a certain point the density becomes high enough that the deuterium starts to fuse producing energy.

 

so if its a phenomena brought on by density then very very cold deuterium should also exhibit the process

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