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Highest education level completed (or currently working on)?


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Highest education level completed (or currently working on)?  

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  1. 1. Highest education level completed (or currently working on)?

    • Less than high school
      26
    • High School Diploma
      40
    • Associates Degree
      10
    • Bachelor's Degree
      45
    • Masters Degree
      21
    • Doctoral Degree (PhD, EdD, etc)
      21
    • Professional Degree (MD, JD, etc)
      1
    • Combined Degree Program (MD/PhD, MD/JD, etc)
      3


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Words and phrases build concepts to stem further thought. Why let our preconceptions of a person with a certain degree or age hinder the purpose of communication?

 

If we're trying to get a specific debate' date=' write the first post with some basic guidelines of education and experience. There are plenty of people out here with more intelligent ideas than those with degrees.

 

Text books spew out the same age-old ideas while many who have not been formally educated have the ability innovate our minds with free thought. An individual with less objective observation of people,society and scientific concept will often bring to light greater concepts than somebody playing "follow the leader" by reading all the same text books.[/quote']

 

True, very true, and I have met many engineers over the years who didn't even learn what was in the text books. I have also met an older man who, with little or no education, is responsible for some pretty neat special tools. He was dyslexic at a time when there was no help for him. But, wow, can he visualize a solution to a mechanical problem! That happens occasionally.

But someone who is 16 years old and thinks he knows a lot about the subject at hand because he saw a movie about it and then starts posting fiction as fact is easier to deal with if we know he is an almost totally uneducated person. That happens a lot more than occasionally.

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But someone who is 16 years old and thinks he knows a lot about the subject at hand because he saw a movie about it and then starts posting fiction as fact is easier to deal with if we know he is an almost totally uneducated person. That happens a lot more than occasionally.

 

Which is where the Resident Experts, Mods, and Admins come in. While we can't check every person's credentials for every post, we *do* keep a keen eye out for BS and thoe who have a pattern of posting it. If they continue to do so we make them not our problem anymore, in a manner of speaking.

 

Mokele

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  • 2 months later...

I think the brain 'matures' by 25. Then it has its maximum intellectual capacity. Then you grow old (get wisdom - but not intelligence).

 

Ok I think I'll stop there before I invoke an argument.

________________________________________________________________

I'm about to complete High school (UK high school that is)

I think I'll aim for a BSc/BEng in something (e.g. a bachelors degree).

Then depending on my financial situation I'll take up a masters but I doubt it.

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  • 3 months later...
Swansont has already linked top the poll. Why are you all still posting here?

 

Mokele

 

Because the thread linked has a different function and a very old poll. If people are between the ages of 18 and 25, then chances are their answer will have changed.

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Just taking my end of second year exams in a Phyiscs undergrad masters degree....

 

And Mokele, the reason I posted that in the other thread is simply because the poll is US stuff only, and doesn't give all the options anyway, I don't know how the US system really works, and I'm pretty sure the us has no equivalent for some uk quals people could be taking or have taken as their highest...

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human's brain grows very slowly after your age,15 years later you will just be as smart as now you are

Reply to paganinio: Not if someone becomes psychotic.

 

 

Thoughts on post-secondary education:

 

I'm working on my associate's degree. However, I think college and universities are all a waste. I've pretty much learned what college was suppose to teach me: how to teach myself quickly and be flawless about it.

 

I'll probably go after the Master's, but I'm not sure about the PhD; people seem to have a hard time getting a job after the doctorate's degree.

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Reply to paganinio: Not if someone becomes psychotic.

 

 

Thoughts on post-secondary education:

 

I'm working on my associate's degree. However' date=' I think college and universities are all a waste. I've pretty much learned what college was suppose to teach me: how to teach myself quickly and be flawless about it.

 

I'll probably go after the Master's, but I'm not sure about the PhD; people seem to have a hard time getting a job after the doctorate's degree.[/quote']

 

Yes people have a hard time after the PHD because academia is not reflective of the real world. Basically, academia can be very isolating from the real-world and the sooner you get real-world experience the better off you'll be.

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Well make sure the experience you get includes cGMP compliance, HTS techniques and lots and lots of diverse automated operations and lots of team collaboration.

 

Pure academic lab experience will keep you at the poverty level for a long time. At least until you decide to get your MBA and get real-world experience.

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