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Partitioning the HDD for XP and Linux

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I want to partition my hard drive into two sections: one for Linux and one for Windows XP Home. I only have the Restore (reformat) DVD for Windows. I must restart the computer with the DVD-rom in the disc-drive to load Windows onto the hard drive. However, I'm not given an option to partition the hard drive.

 

I was wondering how I could do the following:

 

1. Erase Windows from my system.

2. Partition the hard drive for Linux and Windows.

3. Trick the Windows reformat CD into loading Windows onto its own partition.

4. Put Linux on a different parition.

5. Create a dual-boot.

 

I suppose I could create a start-up CD. Afterwards, I could erase Windows and split the drive into different partitions. But how would one control which drive the Restore DVD puts Windows onto? Perhaps splitting the drive into 'C:' and 'X:' would solve my problems. If the Restore CD is picky and consistent, then it might put Windows back onto the C: drive. Yet the Restore DVD erases the information on the HDD. However, I'm not sure if it erases the MBR or destroys the partitions created.

 

How would I handle my problem were the Restore DVD to destroy the partitions I made?

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What you can do is use a Linux distribution CD's installer to create its own partition without affecting XP. You don't need to wipe Windows.

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This is news to me. Last time I checked, a person had to start from scratch unless he or she used Partitionmagic.

Which distributions have the installer?

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I was using Kubuntu last time.

But I don't know if I can dual-boot.

I'll check it out.

 

By the way, I don't have the windows boot DVD. No, I have the restore dvd. It's somewhat limited but will create things onto the C drive. In other words, it won't let me partition the HDD. That's why I'm trying to find some way to manipulate the way it will reformat windows back onto the HDD. I figured using a start-up cd to partition ahead of time (and leaving a logical drive for linux) would allow me to install windows, too.

 

Either way, the Windows restore DVD does not allow me to partition.

 

I know the basics of partitioning, but I'm questioning things. Maybe I should do more than type.

Eh.

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I was using Kubuntu last time.

But I don't know if I can dual-boot.

I'll check it out.

 

By the way' date=' I don't have the windows boot DVD. No, I have the restore dvd. It's somewhat limited but will create things onto the C drive. In other words, it won't let me partition the HDD. That's why I'm trying to find some way to manipulate the way it will reformat windows back onto the HDD. I figured using a start-up cd to partition ahead of time (and leaving a logical drive for linux) would allow me to install windows, too.

 

Either way, the Windows restore DVD does not allow me to partition.

 

I know the basics of partitioning, but I'm questioning things. Maybe I should [i']do[/i] more than type.

Eh.

 

Put the kubuntu cd in and start the install. When you get to the partitioning part, partition the drive the way you want (one for XP, one for kubuntu root, and a little for swap). Then write the drive and turn off the computer. Now you can install XP on the first partition that you made. This is how I did it (used kubuntu's partitioning tool), but there might be an easier way.

 

PS, eventually I just got rid of XP, too much work :P

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the kubuntu installer will do it just make sure to do a few defragments on XP before hand other wise you might lose data.(if its above 100GB do at least 4 defragments).

 

when you get to the partitioning stage shrink the NTFS(XP) partition to whatever size you want leaving some free space and then if you don't want a FAT32 partition to swap files then you can just hit auto assign. if you do want a FAT32 make a 5GB(although its up to you) FAT32 partition and then take your remaining un partitioned space and hit auto assign. the installer will then go and put kubuntu on and GRUB.

 

GRUB lets you choose what OS to boot up and you can select a default and change the timer before it loads up the default (kubuntu unless you change it).

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So let me get this straight: Most linux installers have the capability to act like partitionmagic and partition a drive with info on it into multiple logical drives?

 

That's still news to me. I'll try it out. I was taught that a person had to start from scratch and partition ahead of time. Afterwards, a person could then set up Windows and Linux. But if this is true, then I shouldn't have a problem loading Kubuntu or Fedora Core 5 on the hard drive with XP still on it.

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I installed Xandros (debian) and Suse. I think both have the ability to partition. Was pretty easy. It let me set GRUB to autoboot Win XP after 5 seconds.

 

Question:

What happens when you try to partition a drive that's full? Will the content be erased or won't it work?

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reor, the partitioner in ubuntu sets a minimum size to resize a partition which is the size of all the data contained in the partition. it won't let you resize smaller han that.

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Most of the recent live cd's out there use gparted to write partition data. This is just a wrapper for some of the not-so-nice command-line tools. Part of this is the NTFS utility ntfsresize, which allows you to resize an NTFS formatted partition (as in, move the data so it will fit inside the new partition size).

 

Now, as far as I know, Knoppix and Ubuntu LiveCD's have the latest version of gparted. I can't remember the exact procedure, but it's usually pretty quick and painless and saves an awful lot of hassle. There's no need to run any sort of defragmentation on the drive as the data is automagically moved by ntfsresize.

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